Rohingya

1 In the jungle with Rohingya refugees feeling Myanmar – BBC News

5 sep. 2017

The BBC’s Sanjoy Majumder treks through difficult terrain with people fleeing Myanmar.

2 Rohingya crisis through the eyes of Al Jazeera’s journalists

25 aug. 2019
 

3 Aung San Suu Kyi: How a peace icon ended up at a genocide trial – BBC News

10 dec. 2019

Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi used to be seen as a symbol of human rights, and spent years under house arrest for promoting democracy. Now, as Myanmar’s civilian leader, she is at the International Court of Justice to defend her country against charges of genocide committed against the Rohingya Muslim minority. She will, in fact, be defending the very people who had previously imprisoned her – the military. How did this peace icon wind up in the dock? Video by Nick Beake and Tessa Wong.

4 The Rise and Fall of Myanmar’s Aung San Suu Kyi Explained | NowThis World

24 mrt. 2019

A non-violent freedom fighter? A war crimes apologist? Or is she something in between? Aung San Suu Kyi’s decades-long, non-violent struggle for democracy made her a hero around the world. But once appointed to office, many say her leadership, has been disappointing.
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Born on June 19th, 1945, in what was then Rangoon, Burma, Aung San Suu Kyi was destined to be defiant from the start.

Her father was none other than Aung San — the former military general who negotiated Burma’s independence from the British in 1947. He became known as a national hero, and the founder of modern-day Myanmar, which was then known as Burma.

But in 1947, when Suu Kyi was just 2 years old, everything changed. Her father was assassinated by a rival politician.

She went on to graduate from high school in 1964, and then studied with the global elite at Oxford University. There she met her to-be husband. Years later they settled in the United Kingdom, where they had two sons.

During this time, Suu Kyi continued to watch as her country was sinking further into dictatorship.

After nationwide protests against the one-party rule and the military dictatorship culminated in what later became known as the 8/8/88 Uprising protesters were in search of a leader. They looked to the then 43-year-old Suu Kyi to fill the shoes of her father — as a fighter for Burmese democracy.

And that’s exactly what she did.

But what was her journey to leadership and what would she do once she achieved her goal? And what would her leadership mean for the Rohingya in Rakhine state and the alleged ethnic cleansing was taking place in Myanmar?

5 Roundtable: Rohingya Crisis – One month on, can it be stopped?

25 sep. 2017

Stateless and now homeless. As hundreds of thousands of Rohingya leave Myanmar, claims of ethnic cleansing and the question; why isn’t the nation’s de facto leader doing anything about it?

6 Will The Rohingya Ever See Justice?

27 mrt. 2018

The Rohingya Exodus: Can Bangladesh continue refugee support as Rohingya crisis continues? 
 
Over 600,000 Rohingya have fled widespread atrocities in Myanmar, seeking sanctuary in Bangladesh. As they continue to face persecution, what does their future hold in one of the world’s poorest countries? 
 
For more information, visit https://www.journeyman.tv/film/7265

7 Rohingya news: the desperate journey to safety

25 sep. 2017

Video 28 minutes

More than 500,000 Rohingya Muslims have now fled Myanmar for Bangladesh.
 
Channel 4 News has obtained new footage from the jungle on the border between the countries showing hundreds, possibly thousands, still seeking refuge.
 

Warning: this documentary contains themes that some viewers may find distressing.

IMPORTANT VIDEO

8 Rohingya’s Exodus: A special report on Myanmar

13 sep. 2017

Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya Muslims are escaping Myanmar and paying a price to do so. It follows a two-week surge in violence in majority Buddhist Myanmar that the UN say appears to be a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing.” Sky correspondent Ashish Joshi met some of them. Watch our special report.
 
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9 ‘Prison Island’ of the Rohingya: New island for refugees threatened by monsoon

27 mrt. 2018

It’s been six months since the mass exodus of Rohingya refugees began as the Myanmar military and Buddhist vigilantes turned on the Muslims of Rakhine State. Since then, 700,000 have escaped into Bangladesh to join more than 300,000 others who’d fled earlier. Aid agencies are working to protect their over-crowded camps from the ravages of imminent monsoon rains. With Bangladesh unwilling to forcibly repatriate the refugees to Burma, it’s moving ahead with a highly controversial plan to relocate them instead to a remote island in the Bay of Bengal. Senior UN officials privately express fears it could become a “prison island.”

10 Why is the world ignoring Myanmar’s Rohingya? | Inside Story

 

23 jul. 2012

They have been persecuted and discriminated against for decades but few can even pronounce their name let alone know their plight.
 
The UN describes them as one of the most persecuted minorities, yet the suffering of Myanmar’s Rohingya population increases.
 
So are the world’s democracies ignoring their plight?
 
Guests: Justin Wintle, Brad Adams, Mohamed Nour, Dina Madani.
 
VIDEO MUST BE SEEN

11 Rohingya refugees cross river to reach Bangladesh

 

6 sep. 2017

The UN estimates that over 120,000 minority Rohingya refugees have crossed the border from Myanmar’s northern Rakhine state into Bangladesh in the last two weeks. Myanmar’s de facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi says there has been “a huge iceberg of misinformation” about the violence in her country’s Rakhine state. Ankara is pressing Bangladesh to give sanctuary to all Rohingya Muslims fleeing Myanmar. Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu is to fly to the Bangladesh on Wednesday for talks in the capital, Dhaka.

12 Rohingya Documentary: ‘A boy with no name for a people with no identity’

18 sep. 2017

Almost 400,000 Rohingya Muslims have now fled the violence in Myanmar in the last three weeks, including 240,000 children. Refugee camps across the border in Bangladesh are overflowing, and aid agencies fear it could get worse, warning up to a million could flee.  Jonathan Miller has been in the region to see it all first hand.
 
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13 Rohingya refugees arrive on Bangladesh beaches

6 sep. 2017

Boats filled with people come to shore as Rohingyas flee violence in neighboring Myanmar

14 Inside Story – The Rohingya: A humanitarian crisis

15 aug. 2012

Myanmar’s Rohingya community is one of the world’s most persecuted minorities who have been denied citizenship in their own country for decades. More than a million Rohingya are currently caught in a cycle of violence and poverty. Hundreds of thousands more are being denied access to aid in neighbouring Bangladesh. Why is this community such a pariah group? Guests: Mohamed Noor, Tridib Deb, Benjamin Zawacki.

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We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels.

15 Outcast: Adrift with Burma’s Rohingya – REWIND

28 nov. 2016
In 2012 Rohingya Muslims escaped sectarian violence in Burma, taking refuge in government camps that soon became an ongoing nightmare of abuse and exploitation.

16 Why are Rohingya refugees stranded in no-man’s land? – Inside story

31 aug. 2017

It is a humanitarian crisis that is growing all the time. A week after former UN chief Kofi Annan released a report with recommendations to end years of persecution of the Rohingya people, the situation in Rakhine state in Myanmar appears to be getting worse.

Women and children are among the tens of thousands of the ethnic Muslim-minority Rohingya community trying to get across the border into Bangladesh. But Bangladesh doesn’t want them. Security is being tightened, and many people are being turned away, and are stuck in no-man’s land.

The refugees tell of attacks by the Myanmar military, of Rohingya villagers being killed and their homes set on fire. But the
Myanmar army says it’s launched a security crackdown on a rebel group after coming under attack itself.

The biggest obstacle to peace is Myanmar citizenship. The commission led by Annan says all restrictions on Rohingya should be lifted and describes them as the biggest single stateless community in the world.

But is the international community listening, and will it do anything about it?

Presenter: Hashem Ahelbarra

Guests:

Phil Roberston – Deputy Director – Human Rights Watch, Asia

Kim Jolliffe – Independent consultant working with development and humanitarian organisations in Myanmar

Tun Khin – President – U.K Burmese Rohingya Organisation

17 Crowded & Desperate: Rohingya in World’s Largest Refugee Camp Face Dual Crises of Cyclone & COVID-19

21 mei 2020

A major cyclone hits India and Bangladesh amid the pandemic, displacing 3 million people and unleashing heavy rain on Cox’s Bazar, home to 1 million Rohingya refugees, where the first cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed. We get an update from Steven Corliss, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees representative in Bangladesh, and speak with Tun Khin, a Rohingya activist, president of the Burmese Rohingya Organisation UK and a member of the Free Rohingya Coalition.

18 Will ICJ ruling help the Rohingya? I Inside Story

 

23 jan. 2020

The International Court of Justice, the world’s highest court, has ordered Myanmar’s government to prevent it’s military from committing acts of genocide against the Rohingya.
The ICJ has also warned that the Rohingya Muslim minority remain at serious risk of genocide and ordered the country to abide by the genocide convention, and take all measures within its power to prevent further killings.
The case brought by The Gambia last year accuses Myanmar of committing an ongoing genocide against its minority Muslim Rohingya population. Myanmar denies the allegations.
Thursday’s ruling comes just days after an inquiry backed by Myanmar’s government dismissed allegations of genocide. Myanmar’s leader Suu Kyi says the Rohingya have ‘exaggerated’ abuses.
So what does this ruling mean and will Myanmar abide by the orders?

Presenter: Mohammed Jamjoom

Guests
Thomas MacManus, Director of the International State Crime Initiative at Queen Mary University of London.
Azeem Ibrahim, Chair of the Center for Global Policy’s Rohingya Legal Forum and author of the book, ‘Rohingyas: Inside Myanmar’s Hidden Genocide.’
Simon Adams, Executive Director of the Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect, and adviser to The Gambia on this case.

IMPORTANT CONTENT

19 Rohingya crisis: Reuters journalists held ‘for investigating Myanmar killings’ – BBC Newsnight

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9 feb. 2018

***Warning: contains distressing images***

Reuters has revealed details of an investigation into a mass execution of Rohingyas by soldiers and villagers, which it says lies behind the arrest of two of its journalists in Myanmar.

In response, a Myanmar government spokesman said: “We are not denying the allegations about violations of human rights. And we are not giving blanket denials.” The government said that if there was strong and reliable primary evidence of abuses, they would investigate.

Newsnight is the BBC’s flagship news and current affairs TV programme – with analysis, debate, exclusives, and robust interviews.

Website: www.bbc.co.uk/newsnight

20 Has the world failed the Rohingya people? | Inside Story


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12 dec. 2019

Two years ago, Myanmar’s military launched its crackdown on the Rohingya after attacks on its soldiers by members of the mainly Muslim minority.
The UN described what happened next as a ‘textbook example of ethnic cleansing’.
The army was accused of rape, torture and murder, and villages were burned to the ground.
Almost three-quarters of a million Rohingya were forced to flee to neighbouring Bangladesh, where they live in the world’s biggest refugee camp.
The Gambia wanted Myanmar’s military tried for genocide, and went to the International Court of Justice in the Hague.
But Aung San Suu Kyi, Head of Myanmar’s government, and a Nobel peace laureate, dismissed the case as “misleading and incomplete.”
Why is this one-time champion of human rights defending the army that kept her under house arrest for years?

Presenter: Stan Grant
Guests:
Brad Adams – Executive Director of the Asia Division at Human Rights Watch
Kyaw Win – Executive Director at Burma Human Rights Network
Priya Pillai – International lawyer and Head of the Asia Justice Coalition.

IMPORTANT CONTENT

21 Who will save the Rohingya? – The Stream

8 sep. 2017

Rohingya news: They’re described by many as the most persecuted people on earth and despite calls for help, the situation seems to be getting worse for Myanmar’s Rohingya population. Over the past two weeks, roughly 150,000 Rohingya Muslims have flooded into neighbouring Bangladesh

22 What is really happening to the Rohingya? – The Stream

Live gestreamd op 21 sep. 2017

There has been an international chorus of condemnation at the United Nations General Assembly of the violence being carried out against Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar. Earlier this week, the United Nations’ top human rights official called what was happening, “a textbook example of ethnic cleansing”.
 
On Tuesday, Myanmar State Counselor Aung Sung Suu Kyi – a recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize – broke a long silence with an internationally-televised address. She referred to the flight of about 400,0000 Rohingya as an “exodus” and but did not condemn her government’s military operations. Amnesty International described her speech as “victim-blaming” and mix of “untruths.
 
This most recent flare-up came after security forces and allied militias retaliated to a series of attacks by a small Muslim armed group by burning down thousands of Rohingya homes in the predominantly Buddhist nation. Since then Rohingya have streamed across the border into neighbouring Bangladesh.
 
Al Jazeera has closely covered all the latest developments in this story. We’ll speak to reporters on the beat and hear the latest.

23 Persecution In Myanmar: Left For Dead (Part 1)

9 mei 2016

Watch Part 2 – http://bit.ly/1sacxna
Watch Part 3 – http://bit.ly/1T5NA2t
 
In recent years, democratic reforms have swept through Myanmar, a country that for decades was ruled by a military junta. As the reforms took hold, however, things were growing progressively worse for the Rohingya, a heavily persecuted ethnic Muslim minority concentrated in the country’s western state of Rakhine. 
 
The 2012 gang rape and murder of a Buddhist woman by three Muslim men ignited violent riots in which hundreds were killed as Rakhine Buddhists and Rohingya attacked each other. In the following months, tens of thousands of Rohingya were rounded up and forced to live in squalid camps; Human Rights Watch deemed the attacks crimes against humanity that amounted to ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya. Thousands of Rohingya have since attempted to leave the country, fueling the region’s intricate and brutal human trafficking network. 
 
In part one of our three-part series, VICE News correspondent Danny Gold travels to Myanmar to investigate the violence and discrimination faced by the country’s Muslim minority. 
 
Watch “Escape From Myanmar” – http://bit.ly/1O1SQk2

24 Human Trafficking in Southeast Asia: Left For Dead (Part 2)

Gepubliceerd op 10 mei 2016
 
 
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UNSPEAKABLE SHOCKING

25 Is the UN Failing the Rohingya? – Left For Dead (Part 3)

11 mei 2016

Watch Part 1 – http://bit.ly/1Tz0AgL 
Watch Part 2 – http://bit.ly/1sacxna 

In recent years, democratic reforms have swept through Myanmar, a country that for decades was ruled by a military junta. As the reforms took hold, however, things were growing progressively worse for the Rohingya, a heavily persecuted ethnic Muslim minority concentrated in the country’s western state of Rakhine.

The 2012 gang rape and murder of a Buddhist woman by three Muslim men ignited violent riots in which hundreds were killed as Rakhine Buddhists and Rohingya attacked each other. In the following months, tens of thousands of Rohingya were rounded up and forced to live in squalid camps; Human Rights Watch deemed the attacks crimes against humanity that amounted to ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya. Thousands of Rohingya have since attempted to leave the country, fueling the region’s intricate and brutal human trafficking network. 

In the final part of our three-part series, VICE News correspondent Danny Gold reveals leaked internal UN documents that suggest an effort to keep concerns about the Rohingya quiet, and speaks to a former UN human rights officer about the organization’s passive response to the situation in Myanmar.

26 Left for Dead: Persecution of the Rohingya in Myanmar (Part 1)

In recent years, democratic reforms have swept through Myanmar, a country that for decades was ruled by a military junta. As the reforms took hold, however, things were growing progressively worse for the Rohingya, a heavily persecuted ethnic Muslim minority concentrated in the country’s western state of Rakhine.
 
The 2012 gang rape and murder of a Buddhist woman by three Muslim men ignited violent riots in which hundreds were killed as Rakhine Buddhists and Rohingya attacked each other. In the following months, tens of thousands of Rohingya were rounded up and forced to live in squalid camps as refugees; Human Rights Watch deemed the Rohingya crisis as crimes against humanity that amounted to ethnic cleansing. Thousands of Rohingya have since attempted to leave the country, fueling the region’s intricate and brutal human trafficking network.
 
In part one of our three-part series, VICE News correspondent Danny Gold travels to Myanmar to investigate the violence and discrimination faced by the country’s Muslim minority.

27 Left for Dead: Human Trafficking of the Rohingya Refugees in Southeast Asia (Part 2)

27 sep. 2018

In recent years, democratic reforms have swept through Myanmar, a country that for decades was ruled by a military junta. As the reforms took hold, however, things were growing progressively worse for the Rohingya, a heavily persecuted ethnic Muslim minority concentrated in the country’s western state of Rakhine. 
 
The 2012 gang rape and murder of a Buddhist woman by three Muslim men ignited violent riots in which hundreds were killed as Rakhine Buddhists and Rohingya attacked each other. In the following months, tens of thousands of Rohingya were rounded up and forced to live in squalid camps as refugees; Human Rights Watch deemed the Rohingya crisis as crimes against humanity that amounted to ethnic cleansing. Thousands of Rohingya have since attempted to leave the country, fueling the region’s intricate and brutal human trafficking network.
 
In part two of our three-part series, VICE News correspondent Danny Gold speaks to a police informant in neighbouring Thailand about the discovery of mass graves that have been tied to human trafficking.

28 Is the UN Failing the Rohingya? – Left For Dead (Part 3)

 

11 mei 2016

Watch Part 1 – http://bit.ly/1Tz0AgL 
Watch Part 2 – http://bit.ly/1sacxna
 
In recent years, democratic reforms have swept through Myanmar, a country that for decades was ruled by a military junta. As the reforms took hold, however, things were growing progressively worse for the Rohingya, a heavily persecuted ethnic Muslim minority concentrated in the country’s western state of Rakhine. 
 
The 2012 gang rape and murder of a Buddhist woman by three Muslim men ignited violent riots in which hundreds were killed as Rakhine Buddhists and Rohingya attacked each other. In the following months, tens of thousands of Rohingya were rounded up and forced to live in squalid camps; Human Rights Watch deemed the attacks crimes against humanity that amounted to ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya. Thousands of Rohingya have since attempted to leave the country, fueling the region’s intricate and brutal human trafficking network. 
 
In the final part of our three-part series, VICE News correspondent Danny Gold reveals leaked internal UN documents that suggest an effort to keep concerns about the Rohingya quiet, and speaks to a former UN human rights officer about the organization’s passive response to the situation in Myanmar

29 Myanmar: The Hidden Genocide | Al Jazeera Investigations

30 okt. 2013

Earlier this year a Buddhist woman was raped and murdered in western Myanmar. The authorities charged three Muslim men.

A week later, 10 Muslims were murdered in a revenge attack. What happened next was hidden from the outside world.

Bloodshed pitted Buddhists against minority Rohingya Muslims. Many Rohingya fled their homes, which were burned down in what they said was a deliberate attempt by the predominantly Buddhist government to drive them out of the country.

“They were shooting and we were also fighting. The fields were filled with bodies and soaked with blood,” says Mohammed Islam, who fled with his family to Bangladesh.

There are 400,000 Rohingya languishing in Bangladesh. For more than three decades, waves of refugees have fled Myanmar. But the government of Bangladesh considers the Rohingya to be illegal immigrants, as does the government of Myanmar. They have no legal rights and nowhere to go.

This is a story of a people fleeing the land where they were born, of a people deprived of citizenship in their homeland. It is the story of the Rohingya of western Myanmar, whose very existence as a people is denied.

Professor William Schabas, the former president of the International Association of Genocide Scholars, says: “When you see measures preventing births, trying to deny the identity of the people, hoping to see that they really are eventually, that they no longer exist; denying their history, denying the legitimacy of their right to live where they live, these are all warning signs that mean it’s not frivolous to envisage the use of the term genocide.”

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30 Video shows smugglers beating Rohingya refugees on boat during failed attempt to flee Bangladesh

15 dec. 2020

Enamul Hasan, a 19-year-old Rohingya refugee who tried to reach Malaysia from Bangladesh, has provided a video to AFP that shows passengers being beaten by a trafficker on a boat. Hasan’s story highlights part of a human trafficking network that targets Rohingya refugees. More than 700,000 Rohingya fled Myanmar to Bangladesh in 2017, after the Burmese army launched a deadly crackdown on the ethnic minority group. Living in overcrowded refugee camps, many see the relatively affluent Malaysia as their final destination. This desire to escape has also let to a rise in demand for human trafficking services.

31 Who’s responsible for Rohingya refugees rescued at sea? | Inside Story

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28 feb. 2021

Nearly 2,500 Rohingya refugees risked their lives last year by taking dangerous boat journeys.
They’re looking for safety, and better living conditions after years of systematic discrimination and persecution.
Rights groups are warning – thousands more could take such journeys hoping to reach countries mainly in Southeast Asia.
81 Rohingya who had been stranded in the Andaman sea for nearly two weeks – were rescued by the Indian coastguard on Friday.
Eight people died and many fell ill– suffering severe dehydration as they ran out of food and water.
The Indian government has been trying to arrange for their …..
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Proposed Description (Max 4 sentences) return to Bangladesh.
But Bangladeshi officials say they have no obligation to shelter the Rohingya –who were found closer to Myanmar and Indian territories.

So, what are the consequences if they’re sent back to Myanmar?

Presenter: Sami Zeidan

Guests:

Commodore C. Uday Bhaskar – Retired Navy Officer and Director of Society for Policy Studies, an independent Geo-political think tank.

Yasmin Ullah – A Rohingya Activist and Advocate.

Saad Hammadi – South Asia Campaigner with a focus on Bangladesh for Amnesty International.

32 Is the Myanmar coup a turning point for the Rohingya? | Inside Story

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17 feb. 2021

The coup in Maynmar appears to have united almost everyone against the military.

Protesters continue to defiantly demand the release of Aung San Suu Kyi and other democratically-elected leaders.

Many say they’re only now realising the extent of the army’s crackdown on ethnic minorities, such as the muslim Rohingya.

But will this outpouring of sympathy lead to justice for some of the world’s most persecuted people?

Presenter: Mohammed Jamjoom

Guests:

Aung Kyaw Moe – Rohingya humanitarian worker.

Debbie Stothard – Founder, ALTSEAN-Burma network.

Ronan Lee – Visiting Scholar, Queen Mary University of London.

Yasmin Ullah – Rohingya Human Rights Network.

33 THE WAVE – The Story Of What Happens And Who You Are

1 sep. 2019

THE WAVE – The Story Of What Happens And Who You Are a short story about a little hero ( who actually is you ) and what happens and that you should never be scared because we are all one comment and give me your thoughts thank you Listen to your heart…be happy…don’t give up and always believe!

34 She Has Two Left Feet!

21 feb. 2013

 

We’ve all heard the expression “having two left feet”, which simply means clumsy, but people who try to help this woman put a shoe on her right foot are in for a shock when the big toe is on the wrong side! She really does have two left feet… or does she?

 
Gags are filmed in Québec. Originality, authenticity and joie de vivre..