Convicting the wrong person

1 Helping The Wrongly Convicted |Fight For Justice, David & Me (Crime Documentary) | Real Stories

26 mrt. 2020

When troubled teen Ray Klonsky began writing letters to prison inmate David McCallum, both of their lives changed forever. Hundreds of letters later, Ray graduated from university determined to set his wrongly convicted friend free.
 
Oscar Michelen
Im David’s lawyer, on his behalf I want to thank everyone for the beautiful and supportive comments. Many commenters want an update on David, so here goes. Typical of David’s character, when he got out he began working for the Juvenile Division of the Brooklyn Legal Aid Society hoping to help youngsters avoid what happened to him. It took him some time after 29 years of incarceration for him to get used to life on the outside, but he really picked up on things quickly. He is humble, joyful man to be around. He now is the proud father of beautiful daughter and living a quiet peaceful life. He often speaks to groups at school and universities about wrongful conviction and the criminal justice system.
Jillian Collett
Davids mother is one of the absolute heroes of this story.She has had to cope for 30 years caring for a severly disabled daughter who was only supposed to live til she was 13 but with the care of her mother has lived to her 50s .As well as looking after grandchildren it seemed for most of the time.On top of this for 30 years visiting her son and trying to keep his spirits up she has kept going I am sure over the years she has had people who believed her son was guilty of murder and that must of been horrible.What a strong woman and mother she is hopefully David will be awarded a large settlement and be able to give his mother the retirement she so deserves.
Jackie Dowling
This sickens me to the core that they put a child in prison for a crime they know he did not commit,……….x
Vickystar112
You can tell after all he’s been through he has such a kind soul
 

2 How Wrongful Convictions Happen

The Doctors

 Gepubliceerd op 15 mei 2017

Attorney Areva Martin and psychotherapist Dr. Mike Dow join The Doctors to shed light on why the wrong people sometimes end up behind bars.

About The Doctors:

The Doctors is an Emmy award-winning daytime talk show hosted by ER physician Dr. Travis Stork, plastic surgeon Dr. Andrew Ordon, OB-GYN Dr. Jennifer Ashton, urologist Dr. Jennifer Berman and family medicine physician and sexologist Dr. Rachael Ross.

The Doctors helps you understand the latest health headlines, such as the ice bucket challenge for ALS and the Ebola outbreak; delivers exclusive interviews with celebrities dealing with health issues, such as Teen Mom star Farrah Abraham, reality stars Honey Boo Boo and Mama June and activist Chaz Bono; brings you debates about health and safety claims from agricultural company Monsanto and celebrities such as Jenny McCarthy; and shows you the latest gross viral videos and explains how you can avoid an emergency situation. The Doctors also features the News in 2:00 digest of the latest celebrity health news and The Doctors’ Prescription for simple steps to get active, combat stress, eat better and live healthier.

Now in its eighth season, The Doctors celebrity guests have included Academy Award Winners Sally Field, Barbra Streisand, Jane Fonda, Marcia Gay Harden, Kathy Bates and Marisa Tomei; reality stars from Teen Mom and The Real Housewives, as well as Kris Jenner, Caitlyn Jenner, Melissa Rivers, Sharon Osbourne, Tim Gunn and Amber Rose; actors Jessica Alba, Christina Applegate, Julie Bowen, Patricia Heaton, Chevy Chase, Kristin Davis, Lou Ferrigno, Harrison Ford, Grace Gealey, Cedric the Entertainer, Valerie Harper, Debra Messing, Chris O’Donnell, Betty White, Linda Gray, Fran Drescher, Emmy Rossum, Roseanne Barr, Valerie Bertinelli, Suzanne Somers; athletes Magic Johnson, Apolo Ohno and Danica Patrick; musicians Tim McGraw, Justin Bieber, Clint Black, LL Cool J, Nick Carter, Kristin Chenoweth, Paula Abdul, Gloria Gaynor, La Toya Jackson, Barry Manilow, Bret Michaels, Gene Simmons and Jordin Sparks; and celebrity chefs Wolfgang Puck, Guy Fieri and Curtis Stone.

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3 The top 5 leading causes of wrongful convictions

Gepubliceerd op 27 okt. 2016

 
Attorney Lauren Kaeseberg from the Illinois Innocence Project discusses the top 5 leading causes of wrongful convictions.
 
IMPORTANT VIDEO
 

4 Wrongful Conviction Special Part 1 of 6

Gepubliceerd op 11 okt. 2010

 
New York has a disproportionate number of exposed wrongful convictions; more than 10 percent nationwide. Why are so many people getting wrongfully convicted and what’s being done about it? Legal Analyst Stone Grissom examines the issue of exonerations through the eyes of those who lived through it. Decades lost; families destroyed and a historic meeting as three exonerees meet for the very first time.
 

5 Wrongful Convictions Special Part 2 of 6

Gepubliceerd op 11 okt. 2010

 
Part 2 follows Frank Sterlings 18 years behind bars as an innocent man. New York has a disproportionate number of exposed wrongful convictions; more than 10 percent nationwide. Why are so many people getting wrongfully convicted and what’s being done about it? Legal Analyst Stone Grissom examines the issue of exonerations through the eyes of those who lived through it. Decades lost; families destroyed and a historic meeting as three exonerees meet for the very first time.
 

6 Wrongful Convictions Part 3 of 6

Gepubliceerd op 11 okt. 2010

 
Part 3 focuses on Frank Sterling’s 18 year battle in the appellate courts and the break he receives through DNA. New York has a disproportionate number of exposed wrongful convictions; more than 10 percent nationwide. Why are so many people getting wrongfully convicted and what’s being done about it? Legal Analyst Stone Grissom examines the issue of exonerations through the eyes of those who lived through it. Decades lost; families destroyed and a historic meeting as three exonerees meet for the very first time.
 

7 Wrongful Convictions Special Part 4 of 6

Gepubliceerd op 11 okt. 2010

 
Part 4 focuses on Frank Sterling’s struggle to reconnect with a society he hasn’t been part of for almost 18 years. New York has a disproportionate number of exposed wrongful convictions; more than 10 percent nationwide. Why are so many people getting wrongfully convicted and what’s being done about it? Legal Analyst Stone Grissom examines the issue of exonerations through the eyes of those who lived through it. Decades lost; families destroyed and a historic meeting as three exonerees meet for the very first time.
 

8 Wrongful Convictions Special Part 5 of 6

Gepubliceerd op 11 okt. 2010

 
Part 5 focuses on the historic meeting between three exonerees who have never met before, including the longest serving wrongfully convicted female in NY history. New York has a disproportionate number of exposed wrongful convictions; more than 10 percent nationwide. Why are so many people getting wrongfully convicted and what’s being done about it? Legal Analyst Stone Grissom examines the issue of exonerations through the eyes of those who lived through it. Decades lost; families destroyed and a historic meeting as three exonerees meet for the very first time.
 

9 Wrongful Convictions Special Part 6 of 6

Gepubliceerd op 12 okt. 2010

 
Part 6 focuses on the historic meeting between three exonerees and the future reforms and safeguards needed to fix this system in crisis. New York has a disproportionate number of exposed wrongful convictions; more than 10 percent nationwide. Why are so many people getting wrongfully convicted and what’s being done about it? Legal Analyst Stone Grissom examines the issue of exonerations through the eyes of those who lived through it. Decades lost; families destroyed and a historic meeting as three exonerees meet for the very first time.
 

10 Wrongfully Convicted: Dr. Michael Strong & Attorney Tara Long

Gepubliceerd op 6 mei 2012

 
Dr. Michael Strong spent 25 years in prision for a crime he didn’t commit. Please watch his amazing story of survival.
 
 

11 Bernard Baran, Wrongly Imprisoned for 22 Years

Gepubliceerd op 31 mei 2012
Bernard Baran spent 22 years behind bars for crimes he never committed. A lack of DNA evidence made it next to impossible to prove his innocence. He spoke at St. Francis College on April 17 for the Spring 2012 series, Miscarriages of Justice and Wrongful Convictions, put together by Sociology and Criminal Justice Professor Emily Horowitz.

“bernard baran” “st francis” wrongful imprisonment conviction unjust “new york” saint nyc ny brooklyn heights college crime criminal

Charter Award Dinner Honors Barbara Koster

For the 51st Annual Charter Award Dinner, St. Francis College honors Barbara G. Koster ’76, Senior Vice President And Chief Information Officer for Prudential Financial, Inc.

The dinner raised more than a half-million dollars for scholarships at the college including an endowed scholarship name for Mrs. Koster.

sfc.edu

 

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12 Proving Innocence: LaMonte Armstrong Exonerated With Help From Duke Law Wrongful Convictions Clinic

Gepubliceerd op 22 apr. 2013

 
LaMonte Armstrong served 17 years in prison for a murder he did not commit. He was exonerated with the help of students, faculty, and alumni in Duke Law School’s Wrongful Convictions Clinic.
 

13 Wrongfully convicted man was repeatedly raped, catching HIV

Gepubliceerd op 15 mrt. 2015
Kirk Odom was convicted of raping and robbing a woman in 1981. FBI “experts” and their forensic tests concluded that Odom was the perpetrator of the crime. The court system sentenced him to 22 hard years in prison at the tender young age of 18.

While in prison, he was the victim of multiple rapes from which he contracted HIV. According to the Washington Post, his family abandoned him for unsaid reasons. After 2 decades in prison and a case review, his lawyers were able to cross-reference his DNA with the case evidence. The results clearly exonerated him from the crimes he was punished for.

TO MAKE MATTERS WORSE

The criminal who actually committed the rape and robbery was caught and sentenced the very next year in 1982 for the actual crimes. This means the court system was cognizant that they sentenced the wrong man to prison 1 year before, and had the correct criminal in prison for the exact crime. However, they knowingly allowed Odom to languish in prison for 22 years as an innocent man.

 

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14 It Could Happen to Anyone: The Wrongful Conviction of Alan Beaman

Gepubliceerd op 15 nov. 2009

On January 29, 2009, Alan Beaman, a client of the Center on Wrongful Convictions, was exonerated after spending almost 14 years in prison for a crime he did not commit.
 

15 The Real Cost of Conviction | James Moody | TEDxMarthasVineyard

Gepubliceerd op 30 sep. 2015
In this harrowing tale of crime and punishment, public defender James Moody describes the devastating consequences of being convicted for something as simple as driving with a suspended license and what we can do about it.

James graduated cum laude from NYU School of Law and became a public defender in Miami, Florida. After litigating hundreds of cases at the trial level, James found his home in the appellate department, where he focused on sentencing proportionality issues, specifically related to juveniles convicted of murder. His case regarding the imposition of sex offender status upon defendant acquitted by a jury is currently under decision by the Supreme Court of Florida.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

 

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16 The boy in the box — advocating for incarcerated youth | Eliza Nagel | TEDxHudson

TEDx Talks

 Gepubliceerd op 3 nov. 2014

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Young people in our prison systems are in a tragically precarious and vulnerable position. This passionate lawyer brings the harsh realities of that world to the forefront with empathy and vision.

After a successful, decade-long acting career in New York and LA, which included appearances on numerous television shows including Sex and the City and Carnivale, as well as awards for her independent film work, Eliza Nagel embarked on a year-long trip around the world that included a life-changing visit to Cambodia. It was on this trip that she decided to study international law; four years later, she graduated cum laude from Rutgers Law School. While in law school, her article: “For the People or Despite the People,” was published by Rutgers Law Review. Her passion for working with juvenile offenders led Nagel to move back home to the Hudson Valley after passing the bar. She is now a Clinical Fellow in the Criminal and Youth Justice Clinic at Rutgers School of Law, currently representing 42 youths in custody.

About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

 

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17 No child is born bad | Xavier McElrath-Bey | TEDxNorthwesternU 2014

Gepubliceerd op 18 apr. 2014
Xavier McElrath-Bey is a Youth Justice Advocate with the Campaign for the Fair Sentencing of Youth. He worked for more than five years at the Northwestern University Juvenile Project as a clinical researcher/interviewer. At 13, he was given a 25-year sentence for his involvement in a gang-related first-degree murder. After serving 13 years, McElrath-Bey was released and earned an MA from Roosevelt University.

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

 

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18 Freed by DNA, Angola Prisoner Henry James on His 30 Years Behind Bars for Crime He Didn’t Commit 1/2

Gepubliceerd op 30 sep. 2013
http://democracynow.org – We broadcast from New Orleans, Louisiana, the heart of the world’s prison capital, where more people are behind bars any other state per capita — an incarceration rate 13 times that of China. Louisiana also ranks among the highest in the country in terms of the number of people per capita who are exonerated after serving years in prison for crimes they did not commit. We are joined by Henry James, the longest serving prisoner to be exonerated in Louisiana. James spent 30 years in the notorious Louisiana State Penitentiary, known as Angola Prison, on a life sentence without parole for rape. At trial, the prosecution never told the jury that serology testing from the rape kit excluded James as the perpetrator. In 2011, DNA evidence found by accident proved James’ innocence, winning him his release. We also speak with Emily Maw, director of the Innocence Project of New Orleans, which helped win his exoneration. “Henry James’ case is unfortunately atypical. Everybody in Louisiana who is convicted of murder or rape gets sentenced to life without parole, there is no other sentence for those two crimes. What is atypical about Henry’s case is that they found the evidence,” Maw says. “In Louisiana, as in many places, evidence storage and preservation practices are atrocious. People lose evidence all the time in cases where DNA testing could prove their innocence.”

Watch Part 2 of this interview here: http://youtu.be/FFvtDX9AIQc

Democracy Now!, is an independent global news hour that airs weekdays on 1,200+ TV and radio stations Monday through Friday. Watch it live 8-9am ET at http://www.democracynow.org.

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19 Freed by DNA, Angola Prisoner Henry James on His 30 Years Behind Bars for Crime He Didn’t Commit 2/2

Gepubliceerd op 30 sep. 2013

 
http://democracynow.org – We broadcast from New Orleans, Louisiana, the heart of the world’s prison capital, where more people are behind bars any other state per capita — an incarceration rate 13 times that of China. Louisiana also ranks among the highest in the country in terms of the number of people per capita who are exonerated after serving years in prison for crimes they did not commit. We are joined by Henry James, the longest serving prisoner to be exonerated in Louisiana. James spent 30 years in the notorious Louisiana State Penitentiary, known as Angola Prison, on a life sentence without parole for rape. At trial, the prosecution never told the jury that serology testing from the rape kit excluded James as the perpetrator. In 2011, DNA evidence found by accident proved James’ innocence, winning him his release. We also speak with Emily Maw, director of the Innocence Project of New Orleans, which helped win his exoneration. “Henry James’ case is unfortunately atypical. Everybody in Louisiana who is convicted of murder or rape gets sentenced to life without parole, there is no other sentence for those two crimes. What is atypical about Henry’s case is that they found the evidence,” Maw says. “In Louisiana, as in many places, evidence storage and preservation practices are atrocious. People lose evidence all the time in cases where DNA testing could prove their innocence.” Watch Part 1 of this interview here: http://youtu.be/g__a-Dv9vmQ
 
 

20 From ‘at-risk’ to ‘at-promise’: supporting teens to overcome adversity: Victor Rios at TEDxUCSB

Gepubliceerd op 15 mei 2012
Dr. Victor Rios- UCSB Professor of Sociology

Professor Rios’ 2011 book, Punished: Policing the Lives of Black and Latino Boys (NYU Press), analyzes how juvenile crime policies and criminalization affect the everyday lives of urban youth. He has published on juvenile justice, masculinity, and race and crime in scholarly journals such as The Annals of the Academy of Political and Social Sciences, Latino Studies, and Critical Criminology. In 2011 Professor Rios received the Harold J. Plous award at UCSB and In 2010 he received the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Mentoring Undergraduate Research. Each award is given to only one member of the entire UCSB faculty per academic year.

About TEDx, x = independently organized event
In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

 

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21 My path out of poverty| Lashon Amado | TEDxPennsylvaniaAvenue

Gepubliceerd op 14 jul. 2015
How can young people who grow up in neighborhoods with more liquor stores than grocery stores, more drug dealers than college students, and more funerals than weddings, break out of the cycle of poverty and achieve their full potential? Lashon Amado, one of our country’s most inspirational young leaders, shares his moving, personal story of how YouthBuild USA helped him create a path out of poverty and live the American dream.

Lashon works at YouthBuild USA as the Program Associate of Education and Youth Leadership and represents YouthBuild on the National Council of Young Leaders- Opportunity Youth United. In both roles, he serves as a local and national student leader, participating in speaking engagements across the country and connecting more opportunity youth to college and career pathways. He also serves on the Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee for the Governor’s office of Massachusetts. Lashon achieved these accomplishment despite facing tremendous obstacles in his life, meeting racism, and getting involved with the criminal justice system. These adversities caused him to become apathetic about education and ultimately led him to drop out of high school. He enrolled in YouthBuild, where the staff there empowered him to want more for himself and consider post-secondary education, leading eventually to enrollment and honors received at the University of Massachusetts Boston.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

 

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22 Moving Beyond Basic Needs to Break the Cycle of Poverty | Kristen Miale | TEDxSMCC

Gepubliceerd op 17 mei 2016
Poverty remains a significant problem plaguing our nation despite Herculean work being done by non-profits and billions of dollars spent by the public sector to address the issue. We blame poverty on the poor rather than recognize that many Americans are born into circumstances where the American dream is virtually inaccessible. In this talk, Kristen Miale challenges us to see the core of the problem: we are so focused on basic needs and individual accountability that we ignore other factors and social structures that contribute to a person’s ability to break the cycle of poverty.

In her role as president of the Good Shepherd Food Bank, Kristen Miale has helped Maine’s largest hunger relief organization provide over 23 million pounds of food to those in need. Before joining the food bank in 2010, she was founder and program director of Cooking Matters for Maine, a local chapter of Share Our Strength’s nationally recognized cooking and nutrition education program.

Kristen’s passion for ending hunger has driven her to serve on the steering committee of the Maine Food Strategy and as Senate President Michael Thibodeau’s representative on the Commission to End Student Hunger. Kristen resides in Kennebunk with her husband and two children.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

 

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23 Judge spends night in jail with man he sentenced

Gepubliceerd op 29 apr. 2016

 
A North Carolina judge felt he had to hold a man accountable for lying about a urine test, although there were special circumstances for this probation offender. Steve Hartman went “On the Road” to find out what happened next.
 
 

24 David Milgaard wrongful murder conviction: Who Killed Gail Miller? (1990) – The Fifth Estate

Gepubliceerd op 2 okt. 2017

 
From 1990, Gillian Findlay investigates the possibility of a wrongful conviction of David Milgaard who at that time had spent two decades in a Manitoba prison for murdering young Saskatoon nurse Gail Miller.
 
In 1992, after several failed attempts at appealing his conviction, the Supreme Court of Canada ordered Milgaard be granted a new trial. Subsequently the government of Saskatchewan issued a stay of proceedings in its case against Milgaard, setting the stage for his release from prison in April of 1992.
 
In 1997 supported by DNA evidence Larry Fisher, interviewed in our documentary, was convicted of Miller’s murder.
 

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23 David Milgaard wrongful murder conviction: Who Killed Gail Miller? (1990) – The Fifth Esta

Gepubliceerd op 6 okt. 2017

 
Cold Blood Blood On The Snow Gail Miller Murder Gail Miller was a Canadian nursing assistant, who was raped and murdered on January 31, 1969 in .
 
From 1990, Gillian Findlay investigates the possibility of a wrongful conviction of David Milgaard who at that time had spent two decades in a Manitoba prison for .
 
Cold Blood Flesh and Blood: The Rafay Family Murders In May of 2004, Sebastian Burns and Atif Rafay were convicted of the July 1994 murder of Rafays .
 
Tammy Esquivels boyfriend, William Joesph Greer, allegedly murders her with his two young sons listening from their bedroom.
 

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25 A Moment in Crime episode 9: The wrongful conviction of David Milgaard

Gepubliceerd op 19 feb. 2019

 
A woman is raped and murdered in Saskatoon. A Regina teen is sent to prison for a crime he didn’t commit. The real killer won’t be held responsible until decades later.
 
This is the harrowing story of the killing of Gail Miller, and the wrongful conviction of David Milgaard.
 

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26 Woman who spent 23 years in prison for murder on her life today outside a cell

8 mei 2018

Tyra Patterson was in prison for the murder of Michelle Lai, even though she didn’t pull the trigger, and is now sharing her story at schools across the country.
 

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27 NASA Satellite Falls On Car

26 mei 2011