What is Fair? What is Just?

1 What is Fair and What is Just? | Julian Burnside | TEDxSydney

Gepubliceerd op 15 jul. 2015

Julian Burnside, lawyer, speaks passionately about the need to do something in the face of injustice. When you see something, what will you do? In 2004 Julian Burnside was elected as a Living National Treasure and in 2009 he was made an Officer of the Order of Australia. Julian Burnside joined the Bar in 1976 and took silk in 1989. He specialises in commercial litigation and human rights. He acted for the Ok Tedi natives against BHP, for Alan Bond in fraud trials, for Rose Porteous in numerous actions against Gina Rinehart, and for the Maritime Union of Australia in the 1998 waterfront dispute against Patrick Stevedores. He was the Senior Counsel assisting the Australian Broadcasting Authority in the “Cash for Comment” inquiry. He has acted pro bono in many human rights cases, in particular concerning the treatment of refugees. He is passionately involved in the arts. He collects contemporary paintings and sculptures and regularly commissions music. He is Chair of Fortyfive Downstairs and Chair of Chamber Music Australia. In 2014 he was awarded the Sydney Peace Prize. He is married to artist Kate Durham.
 
 
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2 Errors of justice | Asbjørn Rachlew | TEDxArendal

TEDx Talks

Gepubliceerd op 22 sep. 2014

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. It was sheer luck that led to an innocent man facing a jail sentence for murder to go free. Another man admitted to the crime, but before that – the innocent person had spent six months isolated, interrogated and had become broken down and suicidal.

Later – after the incident – Asbjørn suggested a meeting between the man that had been falsely accused – “Stein Inge Johannessen” and the detective responsible for the investigation – in front of
200 police officers. The learning session made an extraordinary impression on the audiences, and suddenly Stein Inge, the detective and Asbjørn found themselves working together – traveling the world and talking about how innocent people often confess to crimes they do not commit.

As a viewer you should know that the innocent man “Stein Inge” later took his own life – and his son was attending the audience during this talk. When Asbjørn adresses the audience – it is the son he is talking to, and paying respects to – which is also an emotional thing, as “Stein Inge” had become Asbjørns close friend trough their work.

Asbjørn Rachlew is a Police superintendent,
researcher, and a teacher that travels around the world, talking about Police investigations and Human Rights. He has researched in depth what causes false confessions and leads to people falsly accused of crimes they did not commit.

About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

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3 Top 5 Ways People Get Wrongly Convicted

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Gepubliceerd op 18 dec. 2018

 
This video is brought to you by The Innocent Man. All episodes available NOW on Netflix. Find it here: http://bit.ly/WMTheInnocentMan Top 5 Ways People Get Wrongly Convicted Subscribe: http://goo.gl/Q2kKrD and also Ring the Bell to get notified // Have a Top 10 idea? Submit it to us here! http://watchmojo.com/suggest
 
Not everyone sentenced to do time did the crime. For this list, we’ll be examining some of the leading causes of wrongful convictions. Though we’ll be focusing on the U.S. justice system, many of these issues apply around the world. WatchMojo counts down the Top 5 Ways People Get Wrongfully Convicted.

4 Rethinking the Impact of Traditional Justice: Natalie DeFreitas at TEDxVancouver

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Gepubliceerd op 13 dec. 2012
Natalie believes there is a better way to “do” justice. At the age of 18, she volunteered with a literacy organization in Canadian federal prisons, and quickly became convinced of the merits of an emerging trend toward restorative justice practices. Today, she is a consultant and psychological counsellor who works closely with incarcerated populations, schools, governments, non-profit organizations and communities to take a stand against the greatest influencers on crime: poverty, racism, illiteracy, inadequate mental health and social services and lack of community collaboration. Natalie encourages others to think dynamically about social accountability and believes justice is more than an institutionalized response, it is something we build collaboratively.

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

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5 America’s Juvenile Injustice System | Marsha Levick | TEDxPhiladelphia


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Gepubliceerd op 10 feb. 2016

The collective promise of the Pledge of Allegiance to secure “justice for all” is one of America’s great unfulfilled promises, says Marsha Levick, Co-Founder of the Juvenile Law Center. Juvenile courts originally operated in an informal, private manner. The history of juvenile law has seen the pendulum swing back and forth from small progressions to scandalous miscarriages of justice such as the “Kids for Cash” story that came out of Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. Levick illustrates the heartbreaking reality of what happens to children in the justice system whose rights and voices go unconsidered, Levick emphasizes the need to break the cycle of injustice for the two million children arrested each year in our country.

Marsha Levick is working to shift public thinking and legal policy necessary to achieve true justice for our country’s most vulnerable citizens: kids. As a children’s rights lawyer and national expert in juvenile law, she has dedicated her career to advancing and protecting the legal rights and interests of at-risk youth. Levick founded the Juvenile Law Center, where is currently Deputy Director and Chief Counsel, with three of her Temple Law School classmates in 1975. Levick has been the architect of Juvenile Law Center’s strategic participation in key cases across the country, which has led to several landmark Supreme Court rulings, including: eliminating the death penalty for juveniles (Roper v. Simmons, 2005); eliminating juvenile life without parole sentences in non-homicide cases (Graham v. Florida, 2010); and ending mandatory life without parole sentences for juveniles in homicide cases (Miller v. Alabama, 2012).

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

6 What if justice was something we felt | Ardath Whynacht | TEDxConcordia

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Gepubliceerd op 15 sep. 2014

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. What if ‘justice’ was something we ‘felt’? Can ‘justice’ heal pain? Ardath Whynacht talks about trauma-informed approaches to social justice, art as research and what it means to work toward a world without prisons.

Ardath Whynacht is an award-winning performance poet and community-based artist who writes and researches on the relationship between culture, mental health and prisons.

About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

7 Forgiveness In The Criminal Justice System | Judge Sheila D.J. Calloway | TEDxNashville

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24 apr. 2017

Is it possible to have forgiveness in the Criminal Justice System? With a system of Restorative Justice, all of those who were harmed (victims, families, community) have an opportunity to collectively work with offenders to achieve both accountability and restoration moving everyone towards forgiveness. Sheila Calloway, a native of Louisville, KY, came to Nashville, Tennessee in 1987 to attend Vanderbilt University. She received her Bachelor of Arts degree in Communications in 1991 and her Doctor of Jurisprudence in 1994 both from Vanderbilt University. After graduating from law school, Sheila Calloway worked at the Metropolitan Public Defender’s Office in both the adult system as well as the juvenile system. In January 2004, she was appointed by Judge Betty Adams Green to the position of Juvenile Court Magistrate and served in that position until November 2013, when she announced her intention to run for the position of Juvenile Court Judge. She was elected Juvenile Court Judge in August 2014. She serves as an Adjunct Professor at Vanderbilt University where she teaches both in the Undergraduate and Law Schools.

8 Restorative Justice | Laila Fakhoury | TEDxLSSC

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30 nov. 2017

Laila’s talk focuses on the value of incorporating restorative justice in the school system and the ways in which it could minimize the school to prison pipeline.
 
Laila Fakhoury is a sophomore from the University of Florida, where she serves as a speaker coach for TEDxUF and is double majoring in Psychology and Family Youth and Community Sciences while also minoring in Criminology. In addition to her schoolwork, Laila also volunteers in multiple prisons, where she helps inmates develop skills that will aid them upon release. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community.
 
 
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9 Think Like a Lawyer | Adam Lange | TEDxGrinnellCollege

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10 dec. 2018

The practice of zeal. How to zealously advocate for your cause. Keep being a zealous advocate; but in the process, don’t forget to be an advocate for yourself. Adam ’11 graduate of Grinnell and the oldest of three children, all first-generation college students and Grinnell graduates. While attending Grinnell, Adam majored in Political Science and Gender, Women’s, & Sexuality Studies, captained the Mock Trial program, and studied off campus at Grinnell-in-Washington including an internship with the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights. Adam presently works for Gitlin, Horn & Van de Kieft LLP where his current work is primarily focused on litigation on behalf of deaf and hard of hearing individuals across New York City. This includes cases of alleged discrimination under the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Rehabilitation Act, the New York State Human Rights Law, and the New York City Human Rights Law where deaf individuals contend they were denied American Sign Language interpreters or other aids in a number of settings including police services, hospital admissions, and various city and related agencies including homeless shelters. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

10 John Jay Symposium: Why Innocent People Confess

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Gepubliceerd op 27 jun. 2013

 
This symposia was presented by Saul Kassin, Distinguished Professor of Psychology at John Jay College.

11 TheSystem: False Confessions

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Gepubliceerd op 14 jul. 2014

 
Las Vegas detectives find a homeless man stabbed to death and a teenage girl confesses to the salacious crime. In NY, a high school girl is brutally raped and murdered and one of her classmates confesses. But what if both suspects are innocent? Who would confess to a crime that they didn’t commit? In this episode we’ll look at two cases where convictions were reached almost entirely on the suspect’s confession and explore whether the system got it right.
 
The Lobato case is an atrocity almost beyond belief. There’s something very very wrong with the way people almost obviously unconnected with certain crimes are picked up by the police/DA and have their lives turned into hell. And in the end, even when it’s clear there was deliberate misconduct and malpractice by the justice system elements, these elements just get away scot free with no punishment and no one held accountable for destroying innocent people’s and families lives. smh
R. W. Carter
I am one of those people who’s life has been turned into hell! And I agree, until we hold those with the power that be accountable, it will continue to happen to people just like me or you!. I am in a civil appeal after doing 12 1/2 years in the state penatentary for being coerced into a confession after a bad divorce/child custody battle. Even after I got out, since this state has abolished the Writ of Coram Nobis, I filed a complaint with newly discovered evidence and now reconnected with my children who have admitted nothing ever happened to them.. I am stuck in the system and can’t get out. No one will help me and after 6 years of law school, helping other primarily since I can’t help myself.. there seems there is nothing I can do. The appellate court has recently denied my last appeal and I motioned for a rehearing before my next step of filing a Writ of Cert with the Supreme Court.. I guess from there, I have to go to federal court. But you and everyone on this planet can best believe: if it takes me to my grave, I will not stop the fight against these thug cops that knew my ex wife that forced me to confess to something I would never even think about doing.. they even falsified the documents to make it look like I confessed in 30 mins, when in fact now I have documentation (the newly discovered evidence) that proves they held me an incustodial polygraph/interrogation session for right at 6 hours strapped in to the polygraph chair with all the belts and finger cuffs attached, not allowed to have an attorney although I asked numerous times, no trips to the bathroom, not food no water and no break for a smoke which I was a heavy smoker then, this after only 2 hours sleep in a 36 hour period.. I delivered newspapers from 3 am – 6 am the previous day, worked at a grocery store during the day and worked part time at a convienent store in the evening.. I was tired, hadn’t ate nothing to drink and wasn’t allowed anything. The alleged confession didn’t even line up with what was being said from the alleged victim.. after the alleged confession, now there isn’t one victim, but now all 3 of my kids are included. I’m faced with 210 years in prison.. when I was told after almost 3 years in county jail and two attorneys firing the first, that I could plead guilty to a non-violent, non-registry charge of attempting to commit… to prevent further damage to my kids which I know now what they went through while I was away with my ex’s 4 new lovers and a new husband, and the psychological damage, I took the plea. Based on the time served on this 15 year “non-violent” scheme, I only had 5 more years to do. When I was to be released the nightmare continued. When I was outprocessing, a sheriff’s deputy from the county showed up at the prison… He told me I had an Attorney General’s hold and that I was being placed in custody and being returned back to the county where the conviction took place. For what I asked, the deputy stated that the state, because solely on my plea, believed that since these crimes (only plead to one) were against children, that I was being held under a new law to determine is I was a sexually violent predator. Because I didn’t know how to make up a story that the states’ psychologist would believe lined up with what was being alleged and what I plead guilty too and what charges against the other 2 that were drop for acceptance of the plea to “attempting”, I was considered in “DENIAL” and deemed an extreme danger to society. After another year back in county, I was forced before a civil (so they say) trial and because of the denial, the jury returned that I needed long term control, care and treatment which could mean up to life in a mental health institution! I appealled that decision and it was denied of course, and I appeal that to the supreme court and it was being considered. Somewhere along the way the chief psychologist who read my appeal determined that I didn’t belong in the department of mental health and she helped to get me out. In front of another jury, the attorney jury was told to “shut up” by the judge, he said that the evidence didn’t compell the state to believe that the jury would hear proper testimony and therefore granted my 5 attorney’s direct verdict motion. There was no evidence, everything was coerced, the plea was coerce, none of my daughter ever said anything but the one and that was coerced and coached by the mother, that has been discovered.. but the deck is stacked.. all I can do is keep fighting. SCRCP 60(b) replaced the abolished Writ of Coram Nobis.. It gives someone who has served the sentence the chance after release to challenge the conviction. It would seem by the appellate court that they are not going to rule based on 60(b) and go with that the statute of limitations has run and that the officers and prosecutors are immune by absolute immunity. This just isn’t right. This isn’t the full story either. The full story of how nasty those who handled my case and the evidence that blantantly proved I didn’t nor couldn’t have committed this offense nor the time frame or anything really, just goes to show.. it can happen to anyone. I was in the US Army, my dad a 32 year WWII, Korea and Vietnam Vet, and I sit and wonder everyday how something like happened to those above and myself are allowed to happen while I see comments saying that people don’t confess to things they didn’t do and they don’t plea guilty to crimes they didn’t commit.. that’s bs .. confront me and I’ll prove it.. I just want my day in trial sitting on the left side of the court room having my chance to present evidence.. If a jury hears my evidence, I guarantee after all the cases similar to mine that I have read and reread over and over and the notes.. this state will have to pay my life back and take care of my now grown kids for the rest of our lives.. sick bastards and I can’t say it was just a few bad cops either.. it was the association.. my wife knew all three of the officers that interrogated me.. but when I told them no the first time in that room and then asked for attorney the first time… it should have ended right there if they would have only investigated.. my girlfriend/fiance is just so perturbed about what happened to me, but thank God she worked in the court system for over 25 years to understand that these things can and DO happen!!! Thanks for the video .. I’m still researching as of today.. that’s why I’m here watching.. searching .. for that one thing that might help.. !

12 Saul Kassin: “False Confessions”

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Gepubliceerd op 7 sep. 2010

Saul Kassin discusses the remarkable phenomenon of false confessions in criminal investigations—which are far more common than one might expect. His research examines voluntary false confessions, as well as the influence of the interrogation setting, and the authority of the confession in the criminal justice system.

Professor Kassin is a Distinguished Professor of Psychology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

This interview is part of Vera’s Neil A. Weiner Research Speaker Series. For more information, please visit: http://www.vera.org/services/neil-wei…

The Vera Institute of Justice is an independent, nonprofit research and policy organization that combines expertise in research, demonstration projects, and technical assistance to help leaders in government and civil society improve the systems people rely on for justice and safety.

For more information about the Vera Institute of Justice, please visit: http://www.vera.org/

13 The makings of a false confession

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Gepubliceerd op 3 dec. 2010

 
Eddie Lowery spent nearly 10 years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit. With the help of the Innocence Project, Lowery was exonerated by DNA evidence in 2003. Lowery spoke recently to a class at Washburn Law School in Topeka, KS, where he shared how he confessed to a crime he didn’t commit.

14 Barry Scheck 2014

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10 apr. 2016

www.achievement.org Copyright: American Academy of Achievement
 
IMPORTANT CONTENT
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15 Prosecutorial Ethics and the Right to a Fair Trial: The Role of the Brady Rule (Session 3)

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Gepubliceerd op 19 okt. 2009

January 26, 2007
Speaker: Barry Scheck, Director, Innocence Project
Presented by: the Case Western Reserve Law Review

Summary: The Law Review Symposium: The Innocence Project in the Criminal Justice System

Barry Scheck, is a Professor of Law at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law in New York City, where he has served for more than twenty-seven years, and is the Co-Director of the Innocence Project. He is Emeritus Director of Clinical Education, Co-Director of the Trial Advocacy Programs, and the Jacob Burns Center for the Study of Law and Ethics. Prof. Scheck received his undergraduate degree from Yale University in 1971 and his J.D. from Boalt Hall School of Law, University of California at Berkeley in 1974. He worked for three years as a staff attorney at The Legal Aid Society in New York City before joining the faculty at Cardozo.

Prof. Scheck has done extensive trial and appellate litigation in significant civil rights and criminal defense cases. He has published extensively in these areas, including a book with Jim Dwyer and Peter Neufeld entitled, Actual Innocence: When Justice Goes Wrong And How To Make It Right. He has served in prominent positions in many bar associations, including the presidency of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers. Since 1994 he has been a Commissioner on New York State’s Forensic Science Review Board, a body that regulates all crime and forensic DNA laboratories in the state. From 1998 – 2000, he served on the National Institute of Justice’s Commission on the Future of DNA Evidence.

For the past fourteen years, Scheck and Neufeld have run the Innocence Project, now an independent non-profit, affiliated with Cardozo Law School, which uses DNA evidence to exonerate the wrongly convicted. The Project also assists police, prosecutors, and defense attorneys in trying to bring about reform in many areas of the criminal justice system, including eyewitness identification procedures, interrogation methods, crime laboratory administration, and forensic science research. To date, 189 individuals have been exonerated in the United States through post-conviction DNA testing since 1989. You can read about each of these cases at the Innocence Project website.

In Brady v. Maryland (1963), the United States Supreme Court held that a defendant’s due process rights preclude a prosecutor from suppressing material evidence favorable to the defendant. Since the Court’s ruling, the Brady rule has shaped the boundaries of a defendant’s right to a fair trial and defined the standards of justice in the criminal system. The Case Western Reserve Law Review Symposium will explore the role of the Brady rule in various elements of a criminal case, including plea negotiations, scientific evidence and capital sentencing. Participants will also discuss the Brady rule’s impact on prosecutorial ethics in the current justice system. Please join us as many of the country’s leading experts examine the issues that are critical for maintaining each citizen’s right to a fair and just trial.

Some people are not given a fair trial im a witness of it for 24 months I had a judge refusing to take my drug test as evidence said I got them from (PLUMMER) what would close my case was with held in my trial?
 
Manoj Chaladan
Useful and informative , Thanks.

16 Why Would Anyone Object to DNA Evidence?

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Gepubliceerd op 10 jun. 2011

http://bit.ly/lgDIHy – Sometimes a prosecutor doesn’t want to admit that they’re wrong. Other times they don’t want to face the victim’s family after a conviction is overturned.

Question: Why would anyone—even prosecutors—object to the widespread use of DNA evidence in all cases?
Barry Scheck: Well this has changed over time. At first when we began our work at the Innocence Project, and there’s a problem within the system generally, there were all kinds of what we call “procedural bars.” To getting a post-conviction DNA test, much less being able to offer the results in court. In fact, there were no states that permitted post-conviction DNA testing and there were only nine states that said that you could raise a claim of newly discovered evidence to show that you were innocent at any time. So many states had time limits, statutes of limitations.
In Virginia, there was an infamous 21-day rule. Twenty-one days after the trial, even if you’d found new evidence of innocence you could put it into court as newly discovered. In other states is was one year or two years or three years or six months. I mean, there were all kinds of problems like this. So we were able to get passed now in 48 states, statutes that allow for post-conviction DNA testing. And Massachusetts is one of the states that doesn’t have a statute, but you can, based on what they call common law, you can usually get a test result, but they should pass the statute.
So the point here is that from the very beginning, there were all kinds of impediments to even getting this evidence into court. And at first when we went into court and we said to the prosecutors, “Oh, well look at this case. There’s an obvious basis to doing a DNA test and it could prove somebody innocent and maybe identify the real perpetrator, why don’t you consent to it?” And in many instances they would. In many instances they did not. Not for particularly rational reasons, I must tell you. Which is really, I guess the subject of your question, why would anybody resist this? Right? And then even after the DNA proof came in, why would prosecutors still say, “Oh no, no, we’re going to uphold the conviction.” And that is a question for cognitive psychology. And a lot of people thought about it. I think there are a number of factors. The first is very simply, it’s human nature. People don’t like to admit they’re wrong. We’re all like that. Number two, and maybe well I don’t want to give Primacy to any of these, they’re all worked together. There’s the problem that when somebody’s convicted, there’s a victim, or a victim’s family in the case of a homicide. And the prosecutor has said, “Well, this defendant is a horrible person, a beast, an animal in some instances they would say, “kill this person, committed this most heinous of crimes.” And now you have to go back to the victim’s family and say, “Guess what. We were wrong.”
Well that’s very difficult for a victim or a family and we see it so often in the sexual assault cases. In particular, there was an eye witness misidentification so hard for somebody that’s been subject to such a brutal crime to now — who made an honest mistake in making a misidentification to now say, “Oh my God, I was wrong.” I mean you feel doubly, triply violated. It’s a horrible burden to carry.
So there’s a lot of reluctance to upset victims within a community. So that’s a second factor that inhibits prosecutors sometimes and police from acknowledging a wrongful conviction or even opposing an effort to get a DNA test.
And then finally, and this may be more subtle, but I think it’s a very, very important factor because in a lot of cases we would find the prosecutor, who was standing in the way of the DNA testing and refusing to acknowledge the obvious implications of the new evidence, wasn’t even in office when the crime was committed. And the reason, I think, that some of these prosecutors were so reluctant to go along with what was I think a clearly just outcome or even to find out the truth or get better scientific evidence that would shed light on the truth, is that they’re afraid of the next case.
So if we have an exoneration in an eye witness identification case and now I’m trying a new case in front of the jury, the jury had just heard about this big exoneration and they’re always big news. They should be too. And they’re going to be thinking; maybe I shouldn’t trust this eye witness. Or maybe that case involved police misconduct, maybe I shouldn’t trust the police. Or it was a false confession; maybe I shouldn’t be so sure that a confession means that somebody is really guilty. And on it goes. So I think that they’re worried about the next case.
The truth is that if you are a prosecutor that has the reputation for going back and looking back at old cases and correcting errors, I think that you’re reputation for reliability goes up.

17 In Defense of the Innocent with Barry Scheck – Legally Speaking

Gepubliceerd op 28 aug. 2014

 
(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv) Over the last two decades no criminal defense lawyer in America has had a more profound impact on advancing the rights of the convicted than has Barry Scheck. In 1992, when DNA testing was still in its infancy, Scheck, along with his colleague Peter Neufeld, founded The Innocence Project, which has since figured prominently in the release of hundreds of prison inmates. Scheck also achieved lasting fame for defending O.J. Simpson when the former football star was charged with murder. Scheck spoke with California Lawyer contributing editor Martin Lasden about his extraordinary career and the controversies surrounding it. Series: “Legally Speaking” [9/2014] [Public Affairs] [Humanities] [Show ID: 28615]
 
IMPORTANT VIDEO

18 Innocence Project

Gepubliceerd op 9 jul. 2009

 
The Innocence Project uses DNA evidence to help exonerate wrongfully convicted people. In this interview, co-founder Barry Scheck talks about his work and reforms needed in the justice system to help prevent wrongful convictions.

19 “Human Values & The Innocence Project” by Barry Scheck

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16 feb. 2017

The Obert C. and Grace A. Tanner Humanities Center at the University of Utah presents the 2017 Tanner Lecture on Human Values “Human Values and The Innocence Project” by Barry Scheck, attorney and co-founder of the Innocence Project.

Started in 1992, the Innocence Project is a national litigation and public policy organization dedicated to reforming the criminal justice system to prevent injustice. Scheck and the organization have used DNA evidence to exonerate almost 300 wrongfully imprisoned people, many of whom were on death row or had been incarcerated for decades. In his lecture, Mr. Scheck discusses that this is more than just about solving crimes; that it is a civil rights movement. In 1992, no state allowed post-conviction cases to be exonerated by DNA testing. The fact that DNA testing has been able to right the wrongs of the convictions of innocent individuals makes it a moral imperative to pursue the truth and justice for those incarcerated wrongly. Court and police reform are key factors in the process of restoring the true meaning of the justice part of the justice system. The criminal trial system has traditionally been an adversarial model but needs focus on “just getting it right.”

“As America works to close the gap between its promise and reality we must look to the example of Barry Scheck’s Innocence Project,” said Tanner Center Director Bob Goldberg. “It is a critical force in creating the just society.”

Wednesday, February 08, 2017
SJ Quinney College of Law – Moot Courtroom
University of Utah
Salt Lake City, Utah

20 Voices for Innocence Panel

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15 mrt. 2017

To kick-off the Innocence Project’s 25th anniversary, Katie Couric hosted a panel featuring exonerees Kirk Bloodsworth and Derrick Hamilton, mother of an exoneree Joan Anderson, New York Times columnist Jim Dwyer, and Director of Post-Conviction Litigation Vanessa Potkin. Watch!
 
IMPORTANT VIDEO: a wrongful convicted man tells his story

21 The Science Of Justice: Fudged Forensics & Faulty Witnesses

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Think the American criminal justice system is an impartial arbiter of innocence and guilt? Prepare to get a heaping dose of reality, as journalist Jim Dwyer, Innocence Project founder Peter Neufeld, forensic scientist Mechthild Prinz, psychologist Saul Kassin and law professor Ekow Yankah talk about uncertainty in the courtroom at the World Science Festival event, “The Science of Justice: A Matter Of Opinion?”

Subscribe to our YouTube Channel for all the latest from WSF.
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Original Program date: Sept. 12, 2014
Host: Jami Floyd
PARTICIPANTS: Jim Dwyer, Peter Neufeld, Mechthild Prinz, Saul Kassin, Ekow Yankah

Jami Floyd’s introduction. 00:06

Participant Introductions. 1:04

How reliable are eyewitnesses? 2:30

What happens in police questioning that may affect the case? 5:38

What are the different ways that police ask people to make identifications? 10:34

When did the experts start to doubt eyewitnesses? 14:44

A LIVE robbery on stage! 16:00

The case of Jennifer Thompson. 17:22

What is cognitive bias? 26:37

Why do people give false confessions? 32:31

What are the techniques that police use to get confessions? 37:53

Who is more likely to confess? 42:46

The Central Park jogger case. 45:55

Mechthild Prinz joins the stage 54:46

Strengthening forensic science in the U.S. 1:00:38

Who did the audience convict in the stage robbery? 1:05:55

22 Matt Levi Investigates: The Innocence Project

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Gepubliceerd op 24 sep. 2013

 
Alvin Jardine spent over 21 years in jail for a rape he maintained he did not commit. The University of Hawaii’s Innocence Project then came to his aid and helped to free him through the use of DNA testing. Matt Levi investigates the story of Hawaii’s Innocence project and the Alvin Jardine case.

23 The True Story Behind “Conviction”


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Gepubliceerd op 16 nov. 2010

 
When Kenny Waters was convicted of a murder he didn’t commit, his sister Betty Anne Waters promised to help overturn his conviction and set him free. She put herself through college and law school and worked with the Innocence Project to obtain the DNA tests that finally proved Kenny’s innocence. Their story is the subject of the film “Conviction.” Learn more about the movie and the work of the Innocence Project at http://bit.ly/cLagqg

24 Police Interrogation Techniques That You Need To Know About: How Do Police Extract Confessions?

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Gepubliceerd op 9 mrt. 2017
NOTE: Several viewers / commenters expressed concerns that the content of this video is stolen from another vid “Why Cops Beat You In The Interrogation Room”. Just to clarify, this video of mine was created and uploaded in March 2017, more than a year earlier than the other video in question.

This video presents the differences between police interviews and police interrogations. Then, 10 police interrogation techniques are discussed. These techniques range from the soft and gentle to the manipulative, confrontational, and coercive — including: the good cop bad cop routine, making false promises of leniency, false evidence ploys, and 7 others.

The techniques presented in this video are based on the following peer-reviewed research articles:

Cleary, H. D., & Warner, T. C. (2016). Police Training in Interviewing and Interrogation Methods: A Comparison of Techniques Used With Adult and Juvenile Suspects. Law & Human Behavior (American Psychological Association), 40(3), 270-284. doi:10.1037/lhb0000175

Frantzen, D. (2010). Interrogation strategies, evidence, and the need for Miranda: a study of police ideologies. Police Practice & Research, 11(3), 227-239. doi:10.1080/15614260902830005

Leo, R. A., & Liu, B. (2009). What do potential jurors know about police interrogation techniques and false confessions?. Behavioral Sciences & The Law, 27(3), 381-399.

Verhoeven, W., & Stevens, L. (2012). The Lawyer in the Dutch Interrogation Room: Influence on Police and Suspect. Journal Of Investigative Psychology & Offender Profiling, 9(1), 69-92. doi:10.1002/jip.1354

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The views expressed in this video are not legal advice. Consult your lawyer should you need legal advice. The author takes no responsibility for how the video is used and interrupted by others. The author is in no event liable for damages of any kind incurred or suffered as a result of the use or non-use of the information presented in this video or the use of defective or incomplete information unless it can be proven in a court of law that the author has been acting deliberately or in a wantonly negligent manner. The contents of this video are subject to confirmation and not binding. The author expressly reserves the right to alter, amend or remove information presented in this video, whole and in part, without prior notice or to discontinue publication for any period of time or even completely. All information presented in this video may not be reproduced, redistributed, or used for other purposes without the author’s knowledge and his explicit written consent. This video in intended for educational purposes only.

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25 Tired cops, justice and injustice | Bryan Vila | TEDxSpokane

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TEDx Talks

Gepubliceerd op 10 dec. 2014

 

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Police around the country are coming under closer scrutiny in the way they uphold the law. This talk examines factors that impact the policeman, including fatigue, and options to improve the situation.

Bryan Vila, PhD, is a professor of criminal justice and criminology at Washington State University. He pioneered the study of police fatigue, and currently directs the Simulated Hazardous Operational Tasks laboratory at WSU Spokane’s Sleep and Performance Research Center. His research focuses on the impact of sleep-related fatigue, shift work and long work hours on the safety, health and performance of police officers.

Since receiving his Ph.D. in 1990 from the University of California, Davis, Dr. Vila has held tenured faculty positions at WSU, the University of California, Irvine, and the University of Wyoming. Prior to joining WSU in 2005, he directed crime control and prevention research for the U.S. Department of Justice. Before he became an academic, Bryan served as a law enforcement officer for 17 years—including nine years as a street cop and supervisor with the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, six years as a police chief helping the emerging nations of Micronesia develop stable and culturally-appropriate law enforcement agencies, and two years as a federal law enforcement officer in Washington, D.C. He has published more than 60 peer-reviewed articles based on his research, as well as 20 articles for lay audiences and four books, including Tired Cops: The Importance of Managing Police Fatigue (2000).

About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

26 What is Justice? | Robert Reed | TEDxUpperDublinED 

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Gepubliceerd op 2 aug. 2016

Robert Reed was frustrated with the vast inequality of opportunity between his son’s well-off public school system and the most underserved parts of the Philadelphia School District in which he worked. Enabled by his role as assistant US attorney at the Justice department, he empowered students through programs and resources, such as sports teams and youth courts at persistently dangerous Strawberry Mansion High School. He asserts that the public ought to ask for, of his department and in society, a broader definition of Justice.

Robert K. Reed has spent most of his career in government service as an Assistant United States Attorney, including 20 years in criminal prosecution. Since 2001, Rob has been a supervisor in the U.S. Attorney’s Office. He has been the Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN) Coordinator; Anti-Gang Coordinator; and the Deputy Chief of the Criminal Division. In 2010, Rob was appointed as the Executive Assistant United States Attorney and is responsible for overseeing the violence prevention, prisoner reentry, and community outreach initiatives for the office. Rob received the 2014 Department of Justice Director’s Award for his violence prevention and prisoner reentry efforts. Rob has a Bachelor’s of Arts Degree from the University of Pennsylvania, a Masters of Science Degree from the London School of Economics, and a law degree from Boston College Law School. Rob is married and has three children a dog named Scout and a cat named Lienus.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

IMPORTANT CONTENT

27 Social justice — is it still relevant in the 21st century? | Charles L. Robbins | TEDxSBU

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TEDx Talks
Gepubliceerd op 17 dec. 2014

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Pervasive injustice has society at a turning point. Every individual has a choice to make – you can either stand with me and fight for social justice, or you can stay on the sidelines silently supporting the systems that perpetuate the inequality, violence, and poverty that plague our world. This talk highlights some of the most critical social justice issues of our time and calls on everyone to stand up and play a part in changing the world.

Charles L. Robbins is the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education and Dean of the Undergraduate Colleges at Stony Brook University. His faculty appointment is in the School of Social Welfare where he was most recently Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. He is an affiliated faculty member in the Program in Public Health. Dr. Robbins is the co-founder and co-director of the Stony Brook University Freedom School, operated in conjunction with The Children’s Defense Fund. He is on the Board of Directors of MCW, Global where he is responsible for global youth development and represents MCW as a NGO Delegate to the United Nations. Dr. Robbins supports the work of the Long Island GLBT Services Network, Long Island Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, The Children’s Defense Fund and Young Men 4 Gender Equality. Dr. Robbins is passionate about his research and work that focuses on issues of social justice, higher education and student success, gender equality, men and masculinity and violence as a public health issue. Dr. Robbins understands the importance of being a mentor to students and colleagues. He has been married for forty years and is a proud father and grandfather. Dr. Robbins is thrilled to be a part of TEDxSBU.

About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

28 TEDxSwarthmore – Barry Schwartz – Why Justice Isn’t Enough


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Gepubliceerd op 4 apr. 2012

 
Whatever else a good society should be, it should be a just society. But what does it mean to say that a society is just? For most people, a just society is one in which people deserve what they get and people get what they deserve. Whereas it may be possible to achieve the first of these goals, it is not possible to achieve the second. This is true when it comes to admission to selective colleges, and it is true when it comes to any form of material success. Lots of people do not get what they deserve. Aside from merit, success depends on luck. If we appreciate the importance of luck in our own lives, we may be more favorably disposed to helping people who deserve success just as much as we do but haven’t been as lucky. Frequent TED and TEDx speaker Barry Schwartz is Dorwin P. Cartwright Professor of Social Theory and Social Action. His work explores the social and psychological effects of free-market economic institutions on moral, social, and civic concerns. In the book Practical Wisdom (2011), which Schwartz co-wrote with Kenneth Sharpe, William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Political Science, the authors argue that without such wisdom, neither detailed rules nor clever incentives will be enough to solve the problems we face. In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
 
BOOKMARK

29 Why you should care about access to justice | Andrew Pilliar | TEDxRenfrewCollingwood

Gepubliceerd op 25 nov. 2013
If you needed a lawyer, could you afford one? Most of us will experience a legal problem at some point, but the vast majority do not seek legal help. Dealing with legal problems without legal help can lead to injustice, frustration and delay, and even poor health. Andrew Pilliar explains why we should all care about access to justice, and outlines some solutions.

Andrew Pilliar worked as a litigation lawyer, both at a boutique firm and at one of Canada’s largest law firms. In the course of his work, he saw legal access problems first-hand by representing a number of pro bono clients. Many of these clients had good cases, but couldn’t afford a lawyer and didn’t qualify for legal aid. Troubled by this problem, Andrew returned to graduate school to try to figure out a better system.

Andrew is currently completing a PhD in law at the University of British Columbia, where his research focusses on improving access to civil justice. He has worked on federalism matters in Sri Lanka, studied comparative constitutional law in Hungary, and clerked at the British Columbia Supreme Court. Andrew has been a Junior Fellow at Massey College at the University of Toronto and was an Action Canada Fellow in 2012/2013.

via www.tedxrenfrewcollingwood.com

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

IMPORTANT CONTENT

30 Is Right and Wrong Always Black and White? | Juan Enriquez | TEDxBeaconStreet

Gepubliceerd op 3 dec. 2015

In retrospect, it is easy to see how seriously mistaken we were
But at the time there can be extraordinary societal pressures to conform with the norms set by mom, the preacher, teacher, doctor, lawyer, police, and government. Even on a subject as horrid as slavery. In this context let’s celebrate the heroes who stood up, not judge too harshly those who went along, and have the humility to accept that we too, may be doing things our grandkids will consider horrific… An active investor in early stage private companies in the life sciences and big data sectors, Juan is one of the world’s leading authorities on the uses and benefits of genomic code. He is the co-author of a recently published book Evolving Ourselves: How Unnatural Selection and Nonrandom Mutation are Shaping Life on Earth (March 2015) which describes a world where humans increasingly shape their environment, themselves, and other species. He is also the author of the global bestseller As The Future Catches You and of The Untied States of America, and co-author of Homo Evolutis. Juan writes, speaks, and teaches about the profound changes that genomics and other life sciences will cause in business, technology, politics, and society. He is one of the top speakers at TED and other venues. He and Bill Gatess were the first outside guest curators for TED. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

31 We need to talk about an injustice | Bryan Stevenson


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Gepubliceerd op 5 mrt. 2012

http://www.ted.com In an engaging and personal talk — with cameo appearances from his grandmother and Rosa Parks — human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson shares some hard truths about America’s justice system, starting with a massive imbalance along racial lines: a third of the country’s black male population has been incarcerated at some point in their lives. These issues, which are wrapped up in America’s unexamined history, are rarely talked about with this level of candor, insight and persuasiveness.
TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. Featured speakers have included Al Gore on climate change, Philippe Starck on design, Jill Bolte Taylor on observing her own stroke, Nicholas Negroponte on One Laptop per Child, Jane Goodall on chimpanzees, Bill Gates on malaria and mosquitoes, Pattie Maes on the “Sixth Sense” wearable tech, and “Lost” producer JJ Abrams on the allure of mystery. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, development and the arts. Closed captions and translated subtitles in a variety of languages are now available on TED.com, at http://www.ted.com/translate
If you have questions or comments about this or other TED videos, please go to http://support.ted.com
 
BOOKMARK

32 Let’s get to the root of racial injustice | Megan Ming Francis | TEDxRainier

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Gepubliceerd op 21 mrt. 2016

 
In this inspiring and powerful talk, Megan Francis traces the root causes of our current racial climate to their core causes, debunking common misconceptions and calling out “fix-all” cures to a complex social problem
 
Megan Ming Francis is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Washington where she specializes in the study of American politics, race, and the development of constitutional law. She is particularly interested in the construction of rights and citizenship, black political activism, and the post-civil war South. Born and raised in Seattle, WA, she was educated at Garfield High School, Rice University in Houston, and Princeton University where she received her M.A. and her Ph.D. in Politics.
 
In her award winning book, Civil Rights and the Making of the Modern American State, shows that the battle against lynching and mob violence in the first quarter of the 20th century were pivotal to the development of civil rights and the growth of federal court power. She is inspired by people who fight for justice–even when the end appears nowhere in sight. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
 
IMPORTANT CONTENT

33 The criminal justice system cycle | John E. Wetzel | TEDxGraterfordStatePrison

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Gepubliceerd op 17 jul. 2014

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Can we stop the cycle of the criminal justice system? John Wetzel, secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections, challenges everyone — inside prison and outside in the community — to look at the role they place in society, urging everyone to create a better environment for our children and our future

Secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections

About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

IMPORTANT CONTENT

34 Policing the Bridge | Tim Mcmillan | TEDxSavannah


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Gepubliceerd op 25 mei 2017
What one seemingly random traffic stop can teach us about the connections amongst people.

Lieutenant Tim McMillan is a veteran law enforcement officer with the Garden City Police Department. After a fateful traffic stop on October 1, 2016, Lt. McMillan has become an activist for police community relations and civil rights. He maintains an active blog where he discusses contemporary civil rights issues and inspirational insights. Lt. McMillan has been featured on numerous media outlets, and appears in the 2017 documentary film “Walking While Black.” Lt. McMillan is also the founder and director of the nonprofit police research, training, reform, and accreditation program, The Four Trees Project Inc.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

35 Legal cynicism, the biggest threat to policing | Garry McCarthy | TEDxNaperville

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Gepubliceerd op 7 dec. 2016

Previously leading the country’s 2nd largest police force in Chicago, Garry McCarthy shares his blunt and honest thoughts on what is happening in policing today, and how we need to start having a new conversation with law enforcement.
 
Previously the Superintendent of the Chicago Police Department, Garry McCarthy is the President and CEO of GFM-Strategies. McCarthy is a career law enforcement officer, beginning his work with the New York Police Department in 1981 and rapidly rising through the ranks to become Deputy Commissioner of Operations in 2000. As principle crime strategist for the department, he oversaw significant decline in homicide rates to their lowest since 1962. His work ultimately gained him praise from the U.S. Attorney’s office and, in 2006, he was chosen to lead the Newark Police Department. Within his first year, the Department achieved a 9% reduction in homicide, the first reduction since 2002, as well as increased efficiency and professionalism and a 17% increase in arrests with reduced complaints against law enforcement officers.
 
McCarthy has been awarded more than twenty Commendations for Valor. He served as the First Vice President of the Major Cities Chiefs Association and is a member of
 
This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

36 Policing in America needs to change. Trust me, I’m a cop: Renee Mitchell at TEDxOxbridge

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TEDx Talks
Gepubliceerd op 19 aug. 2013

Policing has become a conveyor belt of criminal apprehension feeding the criminal justice system so that statistics for arrest and prosecution remain high. It is time for policing to return to Peel’s original vision of policing and for police to deter crime and disorder while maintaining community relations.

Sergeant Renée Mitchell is a longtime public servant at the Sacramento Police Department since just before the turn of the century. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from the University of California, Davis, a Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology from the University of San Francisco, a Master of Business Administration from the California State University, Sacramento and a Juris Doctorate from the University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law. She was a 2009/2010 Fulbright Police Research Fellow at the University of Cambridge. Currently, she is a Jerry Lee Scholar at the Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge and a Police Fellow with Police Foundation.

This talk was part of the “Defining Today” session at TEDxOxbridge “Timeless Ideas” in Oxford, England at the Said Business School on June 1, 2013. Find out more about TEDxOxbridge at www.tedxoxbridge.com or on Facebook or Twitter (@tedxoxbridge).

About TEDx, x = independently organized event
In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

37 Problem-Oriented Policing: Where Social Work Meets Law Enforcement | Derrick Jackson | TEDxYDL

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TEDx Talks
Gepubliceerd op 12 mei 2016

Whether you’re an officer who wears the badge or a resident who fears the badge this talk is sure to challenge your understanding of what’s possible through law enforcement. As a social worker who now runs a police agency, Derrick Jackson has a unique perspective on bridging the divide between community and the police.

Derrick Jackson serves as the Director of Community Engagement at the Washtenaw County Sherriff’s Office. He comes from a somewhat unlikely background for a law enforcement officer, graduating from Eastern Michigan University with a Bachelor in Social Work in 1998. While receiving his Masters in Social Work from the University of Michigan, Derrick worked with W.J. Maxey Training School where he had his introduction to the criminal justice system. In 2000 he began his work at Ozone House, working closely with at-risk young people in Washtenaw County.

With a background in direct service, community organizing, and politics he continues his commitment to the community by serving on numerous local boards, committees, and by volunteering with several youth programs.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

38 We police have become great protectors, but forgot how to serve | Melvin Russell | TEDxMidAtlantic

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TEDx Talks

Gepubliceerd op 23 okt. 2015
 
We’ve invested so much in police departments as protectors, that we have forgotten what it means to serve our communities, says Baltimore Police officer Lt. Colonel Melvin Russell. It’s led to coldness, callousness, and dehumanized us. It’s time to focus on community policing and working with the communities. Lt. Col. Russell took this approach in the Eastern District of Baltimore and it worked, bringing about record low crime.
 
Lt. Colonel Melvin T. Russell is Chief of the Community Partnership Division, Baltimore Police Department. Russell graduated from the BPD academy in 1981 as the first and only African American class valedictorian. Russell worked both as a uniform patrol and then an undercover officer for 20 years before re-emerging as an Eastern District Lieutenant in 2007. In this position, Russell turned the worst-performing midnight patrol shift in the city into the best-performing in 3 months and was promoted to Major of the Eastern District 11 months later.
 
This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

39 Mending broken trust: Police and the communities they serve | Charles Ramsey | TEDxPhiladelphia

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TEDx Talks
Gepubliceerd op 8 feb. 2016

To understand troubled relations between police and many communities today, we must first understand the national and global history of policing and acknowledge that law enforcement has not always stood on the right side of justice. In this candid talk informed by his 48-year career in law enforcement, former Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey says law enforcement needs to shift its perceived mission from one of enforcing the law to one of protecting the rights of all. When the latter becomes the priority, communities experience not just safer and more secure neighborhoods but the presence of justice. And the thin blue line that allegedly separates good from evil instead becomes a strong thread woven throughout the community, helping to hold together the very fabric of democracy.

Retired Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey spent his 48-year law-enforcement career developing policing strategies, evidence-based initiatives, organizational accountability and neighborhood-based programs, while leading organizational change in police departments. As president of Major Cities Chiefs, Ramsey created the Leadership Executive Institute to help prepare police chiefs of the future. Working with the Anti Defamation League and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, he led the creation of “Law Enforcement & Society: Lessons from the Holocaust.” More than 90,000 local, state and federal law enforcement personnel have viewed the program. With the The National Constitution Center, he developed a program for law enforcement that focuses on the role of policing in a complex democratic society. And he was co-chair of President Barack Obama’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing, which sought ways to strengthen police community relations across the country.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

40 How The Warrior Mindset Shapes Law Enforcement | Dean Crisp | TEDxTryon

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TEDx Talks

Gepubliceerd op 19 okt. 2016

Dean Crisp is a 30-year law enforcement veteran who proposes a new mindset for police departments. Rethinking police and community interactions can repair the often rocky relationship between law enforcement and those they protect and serve.

Dean Crisp was a Police Officer for over 30 years and a Police Chief for 17. He is passionate about helping others become the best leaders they can be. He travels extensively throughout the United States with FBI-LEEDA, teaching law enforcement professionals Executive leadership. He is widely sought as a motivational and national level speaker.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

41 Behind the Badge | Chelley Seibert | TEDxDayton


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Gepubliceerd op 9 dec. 2015
Police-Community Relations has taken a tremendous hit in recent months. With all the negative police stories in the news, it seems impossible to find common ground between law enforcement and the citizens they serve. This talk explores the root of the issue, how we got there and how to work our way back, one interaction at a time.

Chelley Seibert is a retired Dayton Police Officer. Her assignments included Patrol, Crime Prevention, Media, and Academy Instructor. She has taught Cultural Diversity for 20+ years, and Instructor Skills Development through the State. Chelley was the first female in Dayton to be awarded the Top Firearms Award and was named Dayton’s Officer of the Year in 2011. Chelley has a BA in Music from Miami University and Master of Education from Wright State University. She has presented locally and nationally in universities, academies, and at the International Law Enforcement Educators Trainers Association (ILEETA). Chelley currently plays in the band Frozen Feet of Dayton, a choir director for Cincinnati’s TRU Choir and a singer/songwriter/keynote speaker in the Positive Music industry.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

42 Spending Decades Wrongfully Imprisoned: Katie Monroe + Exoneree at TEDxMidAtlantic 2012

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Gepubliceerd op 4 jan. 2013
In 1981, William Dillon was convicted for a murder he did not commit. He spent 27 years in jail until DNA evidence positively identified the two guilty perpetrators. His story is not unique. Mr. Dillon performs in the band Exoneree which is made up of musicians who have been wrongly convicted and freed through the Innocence Project. Their story is a powerful reminder of the responsibility we face in administering justice in America. Exoneree brings together musicians from several states to tell their moving stories in song.

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

43 Justice, Fairness, What’s Right, What’s Wrong | Darin Haig | TEDxNorthHighSchool

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Gepubliceerd op 10 feb. 2015
Darin Haig discusses how the power of story telling, especially with the use of Dr. Seuss can change the way a child shares in therapy and how we all can identify with the stories we hear.

Darin works with individuals, children and families struggling with issues ranging from severe mental illness to those who would simply like to continue on their current journey of self-exploration. Darin sees the therapeutic relationship as reciprocal and rooted in mutual respect, accountability and the desire for self-improvement. He specializes in couples/parenting work, pre-marital counseling and children’s mental & behavioral health.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

IMPORTANT CONTENT

44 Brendan Dassey: A True Story of A False Confession

 

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Gepubliceerd op 9 mei 2016

Featured in the smash hit Netflix documentary series Making a Murderer, Brendan Dassey’s post-conviction attorneys, Northwestern Law Professors Steven Drizin and Laura Nirider, discuss powerful psychological techniques used in police interrogations that can lead juveniles to falsely confess. Learn more about Brendan’s case, complete with additional footage from his interrogation that wasn’t seen on Making a Murderer.
 
For more information about the work of the Center on Wrongful Convictions of Youth (CWCY) at Northwestern Law’s Bluhm Legal Clinic visit: http://www.law.northwestern.edu/cwcy

45 Wrongful Conviction: Brendan Dassey, of Netflix’s ‘Making a Murderer’ | NowThis

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2 okt. 2019

Brendan Dassey’s case gained worldwide attention after Netflix’s ‘Making a Murderer,’ but he’s still serving a life sentence based on what he says was a false confession. This is the part of Brendan’s story that hasn’t been told — featuring his first-ever interview from prison and a new petition for a full pardon.
 
» To hear more of Brendan Dassey’s story, listen to the full podcast episode of Wrongful Conviction with Jason Flom here: https://go.nowth.is/WrongfulConviction

46 Making a Murderer Brendan Dassey’s Conviction Overturned

 

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13 aug. 2016

A federal judge in Milwaukee has overturned the murder conviction of Dassey, one of the men featured in the controversial Netflix true crime series.

47 Kathleen Zellner Interview

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Gepubliceerd op 26 aug. 2016

 

8/26/2016 Kathleen Zellner filing motions in Making A Murderer’s Steven Avery Case

48 What It Takes To Win In Court

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Gepubliceerd op 13 mrt. 2009

 
Jurisdictionary explains What It Takes To Win … in Court … with or without a lawyer!
 
@EarthaKit2 It’s not a “catch”, Eartha … it’s just a need that people have. Learning requires a teacher. My 25 years as a case-winning attorney and innate skill for making complicated things easy-to-understand puts me in a position to be able to help people learn. I need income to allow me to do this full-time. So, I charge for the course, which is reasonable by all means. Get the course and see for yourself. YOU’LL BE VERY PLEASED ! ! !

49 How to order pizza like a lawyer | Steve Reed | TEDxNorthwesternU

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Gepubliceerd op 26 mei 2015


Can using law school training improve how you order a pizza? Law Professor Steve Reed believes so.

Using his expertise as a Clinical Professor of Law at Northwestern Law and as the Assistant Director at the Entrepreneurship Law Center, Steve Reed will demonstrate the benefits (and drawbacks) of legal thinking and analysis when applied to everyday life.

Steve Reed is a Clinical Professor of Law, the Assistant Director of the Entrepreneurship Law Center, and Co-Director of the JD-MBA Program at Northwestern University School of Law. In the clinical program of the Entrepreneurship Law Center, Reed works with students to represent start-ups, more mature companies and social entrepreneurs in a variety of transactional matters. In the classroom, he teaches Business Associations, Advanced Corporate Law and Mergers & Acquisitions, and co-teaches Entrepreneurship Law. Reed also co-teaches Law and the Entrepreneur, a Massive Open Online Course offered by Northwestern University and Coursera that attracted over 35,000 students worldwide in its first session.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

50 – 5 Lies Police Use to Get A Confession | Melissa Lewkowicz

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Gepubliceerd op 18 jul. 2017

“Melissa Lewkowicz is a successful Criminal Defense attorney and Reality TV personality currently starring on the new hit series, “Reasonable Doubt,” on Investigation Discovery (ID), where Melissa works with retired homicide detective Chris Anderson, to re-examine real-life murder cases.” In this video, she tells you different ways police are allowed to lie to get you to confess to something you did or did not do! At a time where police incidents are highly publicized (According to the Washington Post 543 people have been shot and killed by police in 2017 so far), it’s important to know and understand your rights — and the tricks police officers are allowed to use to get you to confess.

“With over a decade of experience in criminal law, Los Angeles-based Lewkowicz currently serves as a Partner at the Law Offices of Chester & Lewkowicz. Specializing in Criminal Defense, she works zealously to defend clients who have been accused of misdemeanor or felony offenses, ranging from DUI’s to homicide,. Melissa is also a board member of Face Forward and has volunteered assisting victims of Domestic Violence with the Domestic Violence Project, and is admitted to practice law in California, New York, and New Jersey. In 2017, “Super Lawyers” called Melissa Lewkowicz a “Rising Star” as one of their “Top Rated Criminal Defense Attorneys in Los Angeles.” “

51 The Bully’s Trap | Andrew Faas | TEDxChathamKent

Gepubliceerd op 16 jul. 2015

 
How creating physiologically healthy workplaces can save thousands of lives and contribute 1.5 trillion dollars to the North American economy Andrew Faas is the author of The Bully’s Trap, and an expert on how organizations can develop and establish psychologically safe workplaces and environments for workers. His first book The Bully’s Trap looks at the impacts of workplace bullying, and provides answers about ow it can be prevented and stopped.

52 My black year: Maggie Anderson at TEDxGrandRapids

Gepubliceerd op 17 jun. 2014

 
Margarita Anderson and her family were featured in national headlines as they lived exclusively off Black businesses, professionals and products for an entire year. Her stand, chronicled in her book, “Our Black Year,” was called The Empowerment Experiment. Now, she tours the country to increase awareness about economic inequalities that starve Black neighborhoods and deny Black businesses, and how proactive support of these businesses can create jobs and curb crime in America.
 
In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

53 Bad Behavior Won’t Stop With Punishment | Adam Foss | TEDxSuffolkUniversity

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Gepubliceerd op 24 jul. 2018

 
Imagine going to jail because you smoked too much, you had diabetes, or you worked too hard. Think about how fast the healthcare industry moves. Now think about prosecution and criminal justice. There has not been much change there. Healthcare takes care of its patients. What about the people who have been prosecuted and their story? We don’t hear about them. Adam shows how a 19 year old boy he prosecuted died, giving you a new perspective on how we can shape criminal justice today. As former Assistant District Attorney in the Juvenile Division of Suffolk County, Adam Foss has become one of Boston’s leading voices for compassion in criminal justice. Recognizing that prosecutors have a unique opportunity to intervene in offender’s lives, Foss co-founded the Roxbury CHOICE Program, a collaborative effort between defendants, the court, the probation department, and the D.A. to recast probation as a transformative experience rather than a punitive process. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx
 
BOOKMARK

54 It Is Time for a New Civil Rights Movement | Adam Foss | TEDxNatick


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Gepubliceerd op 14 mrt. 2017

 
Attorney Adam Foss thinks big. “It is time for a new civil rights movement,” he says. Waiting for the next “Rosa Parks” or next “Malcolm X” is not productive. Instead, he tells listeners to “stop waiting,” because our “new leaders are in this room. Each one of you can do something.”
 
Adam is a former Assistant District Attorney in the Suffolk County Office (Boston). The “Root” named him one of the 100 most influential black Americans of 2016. In 2015 he was recognized among the 40 most up-and-coming lawyers in the U.S. by National Law Journal. In 2013 the Massachusetts Bar Association voted Adam Prosecutor of the Year. Adam is a fierce advocate for criminal justice reform and the importance of the prosecutor in ending mass incarceration.
 
This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
 
BOOKMARK

55 The Role of the Court / Race and Justice in America

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Gepubliceerd op 13 nov. 2015

 
Adam J. Foss, Assistant District Attorney in the Juvenile Division, Suffolk County, Massachusetts
Nancy Gertner, Former Judge and Senior Lecturer, Harvard Law School
Cyrus R. Vance Jr., Manhattan District Attorney With Matt Thompson, The Atlantic
 
With thanks to our underwriters: Open Society Foundation (Founding) The Joyce Foundation (Presenting) Ford Foundation (Supporting)
The Annie E. Casey Foundation (Contributing)
The Jacob & Valeria Langeloth Foundation (Contributing)

56 Change Prank

8 apr. 2011

 

People never have change for homeless people but somehow magically produce it when a hot girl asks for a little bit of money for her parking meter.

 
A presentation of JustForLaughsTV, the official Just For Laughs Gags YouTube channel. Home of the funniest, greatest, most amazing, most hilarious, win filled, comedy galore, hidden camera pranks in the world!