Beyond comprehension

1 – forty eight Hours Mystery episode – Dream Killer

14 jan. 2018

 
forty eight Hours Mystery | Dream Killer | Crime Documentary
 

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2 Why was Ryan Ferguson’s conviction vacated? (first half)

 

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3 Why was Ryan Ferguson’s conviction vacated? (second half)

Gepubliceerd op 12 nov. 2013

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4 Ryan Ferguson Trial Analyzed By Legal Analyst Stone Grissom

Gepubliceerd op 31 dec. 2009

 
Kent Heitholt was a beloved sports reporter in Columbia, Missouri. He was murdered on Halloween. Years later, a dream led to a controversial confession and two convictions. Stone Grissom takes us through the case piece by piece.
 
 

5 Judges weigh tossing Ryan Ferguson’s murder conviction

Gepubliceerd op 10 sep. 2013

 
Two eyewitnesses who helped convict Ferguson of murder recanted their testimony.
 

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6 NEWS & POLITICS – True Crime Garage – Episode #117 (Part 2) : Ryan Ferguson

Gepubliceerd op 4 sep. 2017

 
NEWS & POLITICS – True Crime Garage – Episode #117 (Part 2) : Ryan Ferguson Ryan Ferguson /// Part 2 /// 117 Part 2 of 2 : We all know that a lot of crazy things can happen on Halloween night but maybe none as crazy as this. In 2001 a couple of High School students were out enjoying several Halloween parties. The partying took them into the early morning hours of November 1st. One of them was so intoxicated he could not remember
 
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DESCRIPTION Each week Nic and the Captain fire up the true crime garage flying ship fueled with beer, great discussion and listener participation. The garage covers a new case each week from headline news to local real life horror stories. Discussions about Serial killers like Ted Bundy, Jeffrey Dahmer and BTK, cold cases like Jonbenet Ramsy, OJ Simpson and the Zodiac, disappearances, missing persons and unsolved mysteries are all on tap along with craft beers from all over the world. If you like to kick back and have a little fun with your true crime than this show is for you and your friends. Remember don’t take yourself too seriously because if you do, nobody else will.
 

7 – Clayton Johnson wrongful murder conviction : Tide of Suspicion (1998) – The Fifth Estate

Gepubliceerd op 5 okt. 2017

 
Four years prior to this report, The Fifth Estate had broadcast a piece that reaffirmed the guilt of then convicted murdered Clayton Johnson. In Tide of Suspicion, we presented new evidence that cast serious doubts on the investigation that led to Johnson being charged related to the death of his wife Janice, and persuaded The Fifth Estate that the original story was wrong. With the new evidence the Association in Defence of the Wrongly Convicted took up Johnson’s case and submitted an application for ministerial review of his conviction. In 1998 his case was ordered reopened, and he was released from prison after five years. In 2002 the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal quashed his conviction and ordered a new trial. The Crown decided to not proceed with a new trial, and Johnson was exonerated.
 

8 Guy Paul Morin : Beyond a Shadow of a Doubt (1995) – The Fifth Estate

Gepubliceerd op 16 jun. 2017

 
After DNA testing exonerated him of charges related to the murder of Christine Jessop, Guy Paul Morin sits down for an exclusive interview with Fifth Estate Host Linden MacIntyre. Morin was ecstatic with the outcome but believed the system failed him and that this type of miscarriage of justice could happen to anyone. With archival footage from our 1992 documentary Odd Man Out, Morin reflects on his case and his future after 10 years behind bars.
 
About the fifth estate : For four decades The Fifth Estate has been Canada’s premier investigative documentary program. Hosts Bob McKeown, Gillian Findlay and Mark Kelley continue a tradition of provocative and fearless journalism. the fifth estate brings in-depth investigations that matter to Canadians – delivering a dazzling parade of political leaders, controversial characters and ordinary people whose lives were touched by triumph or tragedy.
 

9 Overturned murder conviction after 22 years

 

CNN

 

Gepubliceerd op 21 mrt. 2013

 
David Ranta, who had been convicted in the killing of a Brooklyn rabbi, is released from custody on a judge’s order.
 

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10 Wrongfully convicted Pennsylvania man exonerated after 11 years in jail

Gepubliceerd op 17 mei 2018

 
Dontia Patterson, a Philadelphia man sentenced to life in prison in 2009 for killing his friend, was exonerated and released Wednesday following an extraordinary court motion from Philadelphia’s district attorney. CBS News correspondent Michelle Miller spoke with Patterson who always insisted on his innocence.
 
Delivered by Norah O’Donnell and Gayle King, “CBS This Morning” offers a thoughtful, substantive and insightful source of news and information to a daily audience of 3 million viewers. The Emmy Award-winning broadcast presents a mix of daily news, coverage of developing stories of national and global significance, and interviews with leading figures in politics, business and entertainment. Check local listings for “CBS This Morning” broadcast times.
 

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11 Daniel Holtzclaw WRONGFULLY CONVICTED

Gepubliceerd op 19 apr. 2017

 
Daniel Holtzclaw WRONGFULLY CONVICTED by the same Police Department he put his life on the line for every single day. Monstrous miscarriage of Justice.
 

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12 Daniel Holtzclaw Latest Update & DNA – Michelle Malkin Investigates

 

Gepubliceerd op 21 mei 2017

 

13 – 2018-06-08 Documents Unsealed in Daniel Holtzclaw Case

 

Gepubliceerd op 11 jun. 2018

 
More information at
 

 

 
 

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14 CRTV: Daniel in the Den | The truth about Holtzclaw (Parts 1 and 2)

Gepubliceerd op 1 apr. 2017

 
Former Oklahoma City police officer Daniel Holtzclaw became a national villain and target of the social justice mob in the summer of Ferguson. He was convicted of sexual assault-related crimes against eight black women. His sentence: 263 years. But what if he didn’t do it? Join Michelle Malkin of CRTV as she digs deep to find out what really happened.
 
 

15 Forensic Scientists Speak Out On Daniel Holtzclaw Case: CRTV MMI Season 2 Finale

Gepubliceerd op 14 feb. 2018

 
Dr. Brent Turvey and forensic scientist Suzanna Ryan discuss the investigative flaws, bias, and DNA falsehoods and errors in the case of former Oklahoma City police officer Daniel Holtzclaw. Dr. Turvey and Ms. Ryan are two of six independent, internationally renowned scientists who released a public report on the scientific issues in the case, which concluded that Holtzclaw deserves a new trial and was deprived of his constitutional rights to due process and a fair trial. Also speaking out in this episode: Exoneration attorney Craig Cooley, retired NYPD detective and forensic expert John Paolucci, Oklahoma LEO Jason Angel, former LEO and investigative discovery expert Ken Tisdel, exonerees and former LEOs Brian Franklin and Ray Spencer. For more information, read the scientists’ report at HoltzclawDNAReportcom
 
For background
 
 

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16 DNA evidence frees innocent man who spent 25 years in jail

CNN

 

Gepubliceerd op 5 dec. 2013

 
Alliance for Rapid DNA Testing director Chris Asplen on how DNA evidence freed innocent man who spent 25 years in jail.

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17 Convicted Texas Man Cleared by DNA Test After 30 Years in Prison

Gepubliceerd op 4 jan. 2011

 
Cornelius Dupree was sentenced to 75 years in prison after being convicted of rape and robbery at age 19 in 1980. After 30 years behind bars, new DNA testing proved his innocence and a Texas judge overturned the conviction and cleared his name. Ray Suarez gets more on the case from Dallas County District Attorney Craig Watkins.
 

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18 Why Would Anyone Object to DNA Evidence?

Gepubliceerd op 10 jun. 2011

http://bit.ly/lgDIHy – Sometimes a prosecutor doesn’t want to admit that they’re wrong. Other times they don’t want to face the victim’s family after a conviction is overturned.

Question: Why would anyone—even prosecutors—object to the widespread use of DNA evidence in all cases?
Barry Scheck: Well this has changed over time. At first when we began our work at the Innocence Project, and there’s a problem within the system generally, there were all kinds of what we call “procedural bars.” To getting a post-conviction DNA test, much less being able to offer the results in court. In fact, there were no states that permitted post-conviction DNA testing and there were only nine states that said that you could raise a claim of newly discovered evidence to show that you were innocent at any time. So many states had time limits, statutes of limitations.
In Virginia, there was an infamous 21-day rule. Twenty-one days after the trial, even if you’d found new evidence of innocence you could put it into court as newly discovered. In other states is was one year or two years or three years or six months. I mean, there were all kinds of problems like this. So we were able to get passed now in 48 states, statutes that allow for post-conviction DNA testing. And Massachusetts is one of the states that doesn’t have a statute, but you can, based on what they call common law, you can usually get a test result, but they should pass the statute.
So the point here is that from the very beginning, there were all kinds of impediments to even getting this evidence into court. And at first when we went into court and we said to the prosecutors, “Oh, well look at this case. There’s an obvious basis to doing a DNA test and it could prove somebody innocent and maybe identify the real perpetrator, why don’t you consent to it?” And in many instances they would. In many instances they did not. Not for particularly rational reasons, I must tell you. Which is really, I guess the subject of your question, why would anybody resist this? Right? And then even after the DNA proof came in, why would prosecutors still say, “Oh no, no, we’re going to uphold the conviction.” And that is a question for cognitive psychology. And a lot of people thought about it. I think there are a number of factors. The first is very simply, it’s human nature. People don’t like to admit they’re wrong. We’re all like that. Number two, and maybe well I don’t want to give Primacy to any of these, they’re all worked together. There’s the problem that when somebody’s convicted, there’s a victim, or a victim’s family in the case of a homicide. And the prosecutor has said, “Well, this defendant is a horrible person, a beast, an animal in some instances they would say, “kill this person, committed this most heinous of crimes.” And now you have to go back to the victim’s family and say, “Guess what. We were wrong.”
Well that’s very difficult for a victim or a family and we see it so often in the sexual assault cases. In particular, there was an eye witness misidentification so hard for somebody that’s been subject to such a brutal crime to now — who made an honest mistake in making a misidentification to now say, “Oh my God, I was wrong.” I mean you feel doubly, triply violated. It’s a horrible burden to carry.
So there’s a lot of reluctance to upset victims within a community. So that’s a second factor that inhibits prosecutors sometimes and police from acknowledging a wrongful conviction or even opposing an effort to get a DNA test.
And then finally, and this may be more subtle, but I think it’s a very, very important factor because in a lot of cases we would find the prosecutor, who was standing in the way of the DNA testing and refusing to acknowledge the obvious implications of the new evidence, wasn’t even in office when the crime was committed. And the reason, I think, that some of these prosecutors were so reluctant to go along with what was I think a clearly just outcome or even to find out the truth or get better scientific evidence that would shed light on the truth, is that they’re afraid of the next case.
So if we have an exoneration in an eye witness identification case and now I’m trying a new case in front of the jury, the jury had just heard about this big exoneration and they’re always big news. They should be too. And they’re going to be thinking; maybe I shouldn’t trust this eye witness. Or maybe that case involved police misconduct, maybe I shouldn’t trust the police. Or it was a false confession; maybe I shouldn’t be so sure that a confession means that somebody is really guilty. And on it goes. So I think that they’re worried about the next case.
The truth is that if you are a prosecutor that has the reputation for going back and looking back at old cases and correcting errors, I think that you’re reputation for reliability goes up.

 

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19 Forensic DNA Mixups | Greg Hampikian | TEDxBoise

Gepubliceerd op 9 feb. 2015

 
DNA is seen as an ultimate tool– an inarguable truth. It has the power to convict, and the power to exonerate. But in this lively talk, Dr. Greg Hampikian shows that even DNA can make mistakes. Dr. Hampikian is a professor of Biology and Criminal Justice at Boise State University.  A Charter Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, his research includes identifying the smallest DNA sequences absent from nature that he calls Nullomers. Using these sequences Dr. Hampikian has invented a method of tagging DNA samples to prevent contamination of forensic evidence, and 198 drugs that are effective against cancer cells. In 2013 he was awarded the Liberty Bell Award for his work in justice, and in 2014 the Idaho Innocence Project under his leadership freed Sarah Pearce after 12 years in Idaho prisons.  He is a renowned forensic DNA expert and has worked on high profile cases around the world including that of Amanda Knox. He has helped with more than a dozen exonerations, and worked on hundreds of cases, recently helping the French police use Familiar DNA to solve a decade old murder.
 
This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at 
 
 

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20 Forensic DNA: Change is Constant, Science is Truth | Rich Guerrieri | TEDxColumbus

 

Gepubliceerd op 9 dec. 2015

 
Expert forensic scientist Rich Guerreri shares a personal journey through the history of DNA in America and the promise new DNA technology holds for identifying missing persons and exonerating wrongly incarcerated individuals. Rich received a M.S. in Forensic Chemistry from the University of Pittsburgh in 1980, and presently serves as the Research Leader with Battelle Memorial Institute’s Applied Genomics Program, directing forensic and biometric initiatives for the development and implementation of the next-generation sequencing technology in support of the forensic DNA community. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
 

21 Forensics and human rights | Dr. Erin Kimmerle | TEDxCarrollwoodDaySchool

 

Gepubliceerd op 19 mrt. 2015

 
Dr. Kimmerle shares her passion for using forensic anthropology to help solve crimes of long term missing and unidentified persons. She has helped investigate war crimes and bring hope and closure to loved ones of missing persons. Dr. Erin Kimmerle is an associate professor of Anthropology at the University of South Florida specializing in applied biological anthropology. Dr. Kimmerle’s work helps solve criminal investigation cases including the recent Dozier School for Boys. She is particularly interested in skeletal biology applied in international human rights cases. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
 

22 Price of Life – Wrongful Imprisonment Part 2

CNN

 

Gepubliceerd op 27 mrt. 2012

 
Nearly half of states in the U.S. do not compensate people wrongfully sent to prison. CNN’s Kaj Larsen reports.
 

23 It Could Happen to Anyone: The Wrongful Conviction of Alan Beaman

Gepubliceerd op 15 nov. 2009

 
On January 29, 2009, Alan Beaman, a client of the Center on Wrongful Convictions, was exonerated after spending almost 14 years in prison for a crime he did not commit. 
 
Music by Kelly Beaman 
Video by John Maki
 

24 Injustice in Alliance, Ohio – The Wrongful Conviction of David Thorne and Joe Wilkes

Gepubliceerd op 2 sep. 2012

Investigative report on the wrongful conviction of David Thorne and Joe Wilkes in Alliance, Ohio. Learn the facts about David’s case here: http://www.WCODT.org and sign his petition for a new trial here: http://www.change.org/petitions/john-…

 

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25 Wrongful Conviction Special Part 1 of 6

Gepubliceerd op 11 okt. 2010

 
New York has a disproportionate number of exposed wrongful convictions; more than 10 percent nationwide. Why are so many people getting wrongfully convicted and what’s being done about it? Legal Analyst Stone Grissom examines the issue of exonerations through the eyes of those who lived through it. Decades lost; families destroyed and a historic meeting as three exonerees meet for the very first time.
 

26 Wrongful Convictions Special Part 2 of 6

Gepubliceerd op 11 okt. 2010

 
Part 2 follows Frank Sterlings 18 years behind bars as an innocent man. New York has a disproportionate number of exposed wrongful convictions; more than 10 percent nationwide. Why are so many people getting wrongfully convicted and what’s being done about it? Legal Analyst Stone Grissom examines the issue of exonerations through the eyes of those who lived through it. Decades lost; families destroyed and a historic meeting as three exonerees meet for the very first time.
 

27 Wrongful Convictions Part 3 of 6

Gepubliceerd op 11 okt. 2010

 
Part 3 focuses on Frank Sterling’s 18 year battle in the appellate courts and the break he receives through DNA. New York has a disproportionate number of exposed wrongful convictions; more than 10 percent nationwide. Why are so many people getting wrongfully convicted and what’s being done about it? Legal Analyst Stone Grissom examines the issue of exonerations through the eyes of those who lived through it. Decades lost; families destroyed and a historic meeting as three exonerees meet for the very first time.
 

28 Wrongful Convictions Special Part 4 of 6

Gepubliceerd op 11 okt. 2010

 
Part 4 focuses on Frank Sterling’s struggle to reconnect with a society he hasn’t been part of for almost 18 years. New York has a disproportionate number of exposed wrongful convictions; more than 10 percent nationwide. Why are so many people getting wrongfully convicted and what’s being done about it? Legal Analyst Stone Grissom examines the issue of exonerations through the eyes of those who lived through it. Decades lost; families destroyed and a historic meeting as three exonerees meet for the very first time.

 

 

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29 Wrongful Convictions Special Part 5 of 6

Gepubliceerd op 11 okt. 2010

 
Part 5 focuses on the historic meeting between three exonerees who have never met before, including the longest serving wrongfully convicted female in NY history. New York has a disproportionate number of exposed wrongful convictions; more than 10 percent nationwide. Why are so many people getting wrongfully convicted and what’s being done about it? Legal Analyst Stone Grissom examines the issue of exonerations through the eyes of those who lived through it. Decades lost; families destroyed and a historic meeting as three exonerees meet for the very first time.
 

30 Wrongful Convictions Special Part 6 of 6

Gepubliceerd op 12 okt. 2010

 
Part 6 focuses on the historic meeting between three exonerees and the future reforms and safeguards needed to fix this system in crisis. New York has a disproportionate number of exposed wrongful convictions; more than 10 percent nationwide. Why are so many people getting wrongfully convicted and what’s being done about it? Legal Analyst Stone Grissom examines the issue of exonerations through the eyes of those who lived through it. Decades lost; families destroyed and a historic meeting as three exonerees meet for the very first time.
 

31 Falsely Accused and Convicted

 

Gepubliceerd op 21 mei 2013

 
Thomas Kennedy and Audrey Edmunds share their stories of spending time in prison for crimes they did not commit.

 

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32 Susan May documentary, Innocent as Charged – Dreamscope TV

Gepubliceerd op 30 nov. 2013

 
Documentary covering one of the worst miscarriages of justice in British History, the case of Susan May. Susan was imprisoned for murdering her aunt in 1992 and, whilst it is blatantly obvious that she could never have committed this crime, didn’t succeed in clearing her name before she sadly died of cancer in October 2013. Dreamscope TV are putting this TV documentary online for everyone to watch free-of-charge because we desperately want her story to be known by the entire country. Let’s help clear Susan’s name and bring back some faith in our justice system.
 

33 Fighting Wrongful Conviction: The Innocence Project

Gepubliceerd op 13 aug. 2012

 
Law professor & attorney Barry Scheck recounts the story behind the founding of The Innocence Project, a non-profit legal organization that is committed to exonerating wrongly convicted people through the use of DNA testing, and to reforming the criminal justice system to prevent future injustice.
 

34 Fighting Wrongful Conviction: The Innocence Project

Gepubliceerd op 30 nov. 2013

 
Documentary covering one of the worst miscarriages of justice in British History, the case of Susan May. Susan was imprisoned for murdering her aunt in 1992 and, whilst it is blatantly obvious that she could never have committed this crime, didn’t succeed in clearing her name before she sadly died of cancer in October 2013. Dreamscope TV are putting this TV documentary online for everyone to watch free-of-charge because we desperately want her story to be known by the entire country. Let’s help clear Susan’s name and bring back some faith in our justice system.
 

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35 How Wrongful Convictions Happen

 

 

The Doctors

Gepubliceerd op 15 mei 2017
Attorney Areva Martin and psychotherapist Dr. Mike Dow join The Doctors to shed light on why the wrong people sometimes end up behind bars.
 

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36 Court Clerk fired for helping free wrongfully convicted man

 

Gepubliceerd op 15 aug. 2013

Sharon Snyder was fired in June for giving Robert Nelson a public document that showed him how to properly seek DNA tests.

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37 Richard Phillips Is Not Bitter After 45 Years In Prison For A Wrongful Conviction

Gepubliceerd op 12 apr. 2018
71 year old Richard Phillips speaks after spending 45 years in prison for a murder he didn’t commit. He’s a free man now and says he is NOT bitter! He will eventually receive restitution payments for his wrongful imprisonment, but he is struggling with daily expenses. His GoFundMe page link is at the full story.

Read more » Case Dropped Against Michigan Man Who Spent 45 Years In Prison | WWJ Newsradio 950 http://bit.ly/2HhZOtG

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38 Candid Camera Classic: Fear of Flying!

4 mei 2016

At the North Las Vegas Airport, Peter Funt plays the part of a pilot on a tour of the Grand Canyon.
 
NOTE: We are the owners of this video and all content on this YouTube channel. We produce the “Candid Camera” TV show. No material on this channel is borrowed or sourced from any other owner or creator. —Candid Camera, Inc.