The Industrial Revolution

The period of time during which work began to be done more by machines in factories than by hand at home

Cambridge Dictionary

1 History of Industrial Revolution Documentary

 

22 jul. 2017

 
The Industrial Revolution was the changeover to new industrial processes from somewhere in 1760 to sometime between 1820 and 1840. This evolution comprised of moving from manufacturing goods with hands to machineries, bettered efficacy of water power, manufacturing of new chemicals and producing iron through new ways, usage of steam power, the advancement of machine tools and the upsurge of the factories.

2 – 25 Facts About the Industrial Revolution (Featuring Alternate History Hub)

25 mrt. 2016

The Industrial Revolution was one of the most profound and impactful events to occur in human history. Taking place during the 1700’s and 1800’s, the revolution shifted millions of people from their traditionally agrarian lifestyles in the countryside to industrial lifestyles in urban settings. Before the massive factories were set up, most manufacturing was done on a small scale by craftsmen, often at their homes with rudimentary tools and machines. The shift to purpose-built machinery and mass production allowed many countries to greatly expand their wealth and take dominant roles in new industries and the global economy. These are but a few facts about the industrial revolution.
 
From improved transportation systems powered by steam and fossil fuels to faster communication across the ocean to centralized banking in the major metropolises, the Industrial Revolution synthesized and simplified many seemingly disparate areas of life. While many in the upper classes saw their standard of living improve, many of the poor and working classes were thrown into the dingy squalor of overcrowded, unsafe factories and forced to work long overtime by whip-cracking bosses. To find out about what shaped modern-day history and what we have to thank for the automobile, condominiums, and even smartphones, check out this list of 25 Facts About the Industrial Revolution.
 

Birthplace of Industrial Revolution
Britain’s shady dealings
Why didn’t other countries industrialize first?
A yarn-spinner changes history
The Anti-Industrialists
Metals change the game
Rise of fossil fuels
Steam starts powering the machines
The first steam locomotive
America jumps in the game
The States dominate cotton
Communication improves
The banking industry jumps on the wagon
Slums spring up
Countryside left empty
Child labor was rampant
Machine smuggling begins
Industrialization ends the power of Russian elites
Industrialization fosters colonialism
Downsides of industrialization
Important discoveries
First World’s Fair
America takes over from Britain
It may not have been such a revolution after all
Industrial Revolution’s modern-day impact

If you liked our list on the Industrial Revolution check out Alternate History’s What if the Industrial Revolution Never Happened?: https://youtu.be/PjYUut5NcTs

 
Music: Industrial Revolution by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons
 
IMPORTANT CONTENT
 
FACTS 12, 10 and 6

3 Working and Living conditions during the industrial revolution

 

24 okt. 2012

History Homework

4 Private Life Of the Industrial Revolution: Social Change | History Documentary | Reel Truth History

26 nov. 2018

Sir Tony Robinson heads to the Quarry Bank Mill in Cheshire, United Kingdom to explore the true story of the factory workers whose blood, sweat and toil started the Industrial Revolution. He learns how they rose up to start a social change that would ultimately lay the foundations for the country we know today. In this episode, Tony takes a deeper look into Quarry Bank Mill to discover what conditions the men, women and children all had to deal with when they worked there.

Welcome to the History Channel, the home of gripping and powerful documentaries. Here you can watch both full length documentaries and series that explore some of the most comprehensive pieces of world history.

5 The early 1900’s

3 aug. 2014

Description

6 The Industrial Revolution | BBC Documentary

9 aug. 2018

The Industrial Revolution was one of the greatest transformative moments in history, revolutionising the way humans worked, how they ordered their societies and how they thought about their lives all over the world. But was it really a happy coincidence that a handful of geniuses unleashed the fruits of their inventiveness on a grateful nation at roughly the same time? And if so why did it happen in Britain as opposed to France or Germany or even the United States? Told with an international perspective, Professor Jeremy Black explores how a unique international position allowed 19th century Britain to become the richest, most powerful nation on earth and to set in motion the changes that soon swept over the planet.
 
 
Welcome to the BBC Documentary channel, offering audiences long-form documentaries that deliver a thought provoking and captivating viewing experience inside key moments from history and the lives of fascinating people.

7 The Industrial Revolution: Crash Course European History #24

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5 nov. 2019

We’ve talked about a lot of revolutions in 19th Century Europe, and today we’re moving on to a less warlike revolution, the Industrial Revolution. You’ll learn about the development of steam power and mechanization, and the labor and social movements that this revolution engendered.

SOURCES

Hobsbawm, Eric. Studies in Archaic Forms of Social Movements in the 19th and 20th Centuries. New York: W. W. Norton, 1965.

Hunt, Lynn. et al. The Making of the West: Peoples and Cultures, 6th ed. Boston: Bedford St. Martin’s, 2019.

Kent, Susan Kingsley. A New History of Britain since 1688: Four Nations and an Empire. New York: Oxford University Press, 2017.

Riello, Giorgio. Cotton: The Fabric That Made the Modern World. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013.

Smith, Bonnie G. et al. World in the Making: A Global History. New York: Oxford University Press, 2019.

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8 Industrial Revolution Overview

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18 nov. 2011

9 How Britain Glossed Over Their Role In Slavery | Britain’s Slave Trade | Timeline

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19 jun. 2017

The Old Corruption challenges the accepted version of the history of abolition, that the passive, suffering slaves were freed by benevolent white crusaders, revealing the corruption of the plantations owners, and how the inhuman treatment of African people was finally acknowledged.
 
This is the untold story of the greatest slaving nation in history. Up till now, Britain’s place in the history of slavery has been as the country that abolished the international slave trade. 
 
Britain’s Slave Trade reveals the shameful truth behind this liberal facade, showing how the economic, social and cultural life of Britain would have been unrecognisable without slavery. Britain’s Slave Trade explains how a middling European power transformed itself into the ruler of the waves, tracing the impact this had on the British way of life and taking in the Industrial Revolution, the beginnings of Empire and the birth of modern racism along the way. It also unearths startling evidence showing how many families that think of themselves as ‘pure’ English stock are in fact descended from slave ancestors.

10 Industrial Revolution: Spinning Mills

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8 dec. 2011

Watch and take notes over this video from Mill Times.
 
List of Questions to answer:
1. What are the physics behind the operation of a steam engine?
2. What role does the steam engine play within the larger machine?
3. What alterations were made to steam engine system to incorporate it into a textile mill?
4. What is the significance of the flywheeel?
5. What had to be changed with the steam engine to move it from fixed (on the ground) to mobile (on the train)?
6. What would you have to now plan for because of this change?
6.1: (bonus) How does this account for a landmark in Campbell?

11 The Children Who Built Victorian Britain Part 1

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8 sep. 2011


The catalyst to Britain’s Industrial Revolution was the slave labour of orphans and destitute children. In this shocking and moving account of their exploitation and eventual emancipation, Professor Jane Humphries uses the actual words of these child workers (recorded in diaries, interviews and letters) to let them tell their own story. She also uses groundbreaking animation to bring to life a world where 12-year-olds went to war at Trafalgar and six-year-olds worked the fields as human scarecrows.

Jane Humphries:

Jane Humphries is a fellow of All Soul Souls College and a Professor of Economic History at Oxford University and the author of “Childhood and Child Labour in the British Industrial Revolution”.

In “The Children Who Built Victorian England” she uses the biographies, letters, diaries and documents of hundreds of working children to tell the story of the Industrial Revolution from their perspective. By accessing their testimonies she allows them to speak up for themselves and what they have to say may surprise you. These children weren’t mindless drones or soul-less victims; they were feisty, clever, gutsy and determined people who collectively made sure that future generations did not suffer the same fate they did.

The programme also sees Jane visiting Jane visits the places where the children worked as she tries to get a picture of how widespread the practice of child labour was. She also looks at the kind of jobs that, 200 years ago, were seen as appropriate for children.

More tellingly she also reveals the social conditions which created a population boom amongst the poor – one which was exploited by the early industrialists. For example most of the new factories were built in sparsely populated areas and so their workforce was provided through the trafficking of orphans from the cities. These destitute children aged eight and sometimes younger, who were handed over by the Parish authorities and signed up to work for free until they reached adulthood. Without this available slave labour many businesses would never have got off the ground.

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. All copyrighted materials contained herein belong to their respective copyright holders, I do not claim ownership over any of these materials. I realize no profit, monetary or otherwise, from the exhibition of these videos.

12 The Children Who Built Victorian Britain Part 2

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8 sep. 2011


The catalyst to Britain’s Industrial Revolution was the slave labour of orphans and destitute children. In this shocking and moving account of their exploitation and eventual emancipation, Professor Jane Humphries uses the actual words of these child workers (recorded in diaries, interviews and letters) to let them tell their own story. She also uses groundbreaking animation to bring to life a world where 12-year-olds went to war at Trafalgar and six-year-olds worked the fields as human scarecrows.

Jane Humphries:

Jane Humphries is a fellow of All Soul Souls College and a Professor of Economic History at Oxford University and the author of “Childhood and Child Labour in the British Industrial Revolution”.

In “The Children Who Built Victorian England” she uses the biographies, letters, diaries and documents of hundreds of working children to tell the story of the Industrial Revolution from their perspective. By accessing their testimonies she allows them to speak up for themselves and what they have to say may surprise you. These children weren’t mindless drones or soul-less victims; they were feisty, clever, gutsy and determined people who collectively made sure that future generations did not suffer the same fate they did.

The programme also sees Jane visiting Jane visits the places where the children worked as she tries to get a picture of how widespread the practice of child labour was. She also looks at the kind of jobs that, 200 years ago, were seen as appropriate for children.

More tellingly she also reveals the social conditions which created a population boom amongst the poor – one which was exploited by the early industrialists. For example most of the new factories were built in sparsely populated areas and so their workforce was provided through the trafficking of orphans from the cities. These destitute children aged eight and sometimes younger, who were handed over by the Parish authorities and signed up to work for free until they reached adulthood. Without this available slave labour many businesses would never have got off the ground.

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. All copyrighted materials contained herein belong to their respective copyright holders, I do not claim ownership over any of these materials. I realize no profit, monetary or otherwise, from the exhibition of these videos.

13 The Children Who Built Victorian Britain Part 3

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8 sep. 2011


The catalyst to Britain’s Industrial Revolution was the slave labour of orphans and destitute children. In this shocking and moving account of their exploitation and eventual emancipation, Professor Jane Humphries uses the actual words of these child workers (recorded in diaries, interviews and letters) to let them tell their own story. She also uses groundbreaking animation to bring to life a world where 12-year-olds went to war at Trafalgar and six-year-olds worked the fields as human scarecrows.

Jane Humphries:

Jane Humphries is a fellow of All Soul Souls College and a Professor of Economic History at Oxford University and the author of “Childhood and Child Labour in the British Industrial Revolution”.

In “The Children Who Built Victorian England” she uses the biographies, letters, diaries and documents of hundreds of working children to tell the story of the Industrial Revolution from their perspective. By accessing their testimonies she allows them to speak up for themselves and what they have to say may surprise you. These children weren’t mindless drones or soul-less victims; they were feisty, clever, gutsy and determined people who collectively made sure that future generations did not suffer the same fate they did.

The programme also sees Jane visiting Jane visits the places where the children worked as she tries to get a picture of how widespread the practice of child labour was. She also looks at the kind of jobs that, 200 years ago, were seen as appropriate for children.

More tellingly she also reveals the social conditions which created a population boom amongst the poor – one which was exploited by the early industrialists. For example most of the new factories were built in sparsely populated areas and so their workforce was provided through the trafficking of orphans from the cities. These destitute children aged eight and sometimes younger, who were handed over by the Parish authorities and signed up to work for free until they reached adulthood. Without this available slave labour many businesses would never have got off the ground.

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. All copyrighted materials contained herein belong to their respective copyright holders, I do not claim ownership over any of these materials. I realize no profit, monetary or otherwise, from the exhibition of these videos.

 

14 The Children Who Built Victorian Britain Part 4

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15 The Industrial Revolution, Capitalism and the United States of America

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4 mrt. 2015

Explains why the United States is exceptional.
 
andrew sapia
the 3/5 rule was meant to undermine slavery by limiting power of the southern slave owning states in the congress. It is always misunderstood as if it were a bad thing when it was in fact a good thing.
bighand69
Slavery was not free market as it involved removing people from the market place.
M.e.l
Omgggg every time he smacks its pudding me off like wtfff😑🙄🙄

16 Vélo enchassé dans le poteau

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31 aug. 2012

Comment est-ce arrivé???  Le vélo que le cycliste a cadenasser sur le support à bicyclette se retrouve enchassé dans le poteau de dix pieds de haut. Il n’y a pas de miracle possible mais on a bien le goût d’y croire. Un autre mystère de Juste pour rire.

Une présentation de la chaine vidéo YouTube officielle de Juste pour rire les gags. Bourrez-vous la face des meilleurs et plus drôls gags de caméra cachée jamais tournés.