Righteousness

Morally correct behaviour , or a feeling that you are behaving in a morally correct way:

She is completely convinced of her own righteousness.
He has left the path of righteousness.

Cambridge Dictionary

 More examples

His anger was prompted by a sense of righteousness.
They thought the righteousness of the cause was self-evident.
Our religion tells us that we should seek righteousness.

righteous

morally correct:

He was regarded as a righteous and holy man.
“It’s not only morally righteous, it’s good business,” he said.

disapproving believing and showing that you are morally correct, and that others are not:

His righteous indignation left senators on the Commerce Committee rolling their eyes.
an outburst of righteous anger

More examples

Most people are righteous at heart.
Her causes are always righteous and her beliefs invariably absolute.
The driver puffed himself up with righteous outrage.
She was full of righteous indignation at the thought that I was cynically testing to see how far she’d go, but offered no apology for her own behaviour.

the righteous

people who behave in a way that is morally correct

Examples of “righteous”
These examples are from the Cambridge English Corpus and from sources on the web. Any opinions in the examples do not represent the opinion of the Cambridge Dictionary editors or of Cambridge University Press or its licensors.

  • Perhaps a righteous person will have greater confidence in speaking on behalf of righteousness if he has nothing in this world.
    From Cambridge English Corpus
  • Similarly, the sinner avoids righteous people and is attracted to the putrid elements of society.
    From Cambridge English Corpus
  • Commentators tended to be sensitive and objective in tone, never righteous or condescending.
    From Cambridge English Corpus
  • Since envy is shameful, it is attractive to misrepresent one’s envy as righteous anger to others.
    From Cambridge English Corpus
  • No doubt the urge to control undesirable expression can be traced to righteous moral emotions, but the pretheoretical convictions they support should not be too quickly translated into coercive legislation.
    From Cambridge English Corpus
  • Either you agree that the world is about to come to an end and are fired by righteous indignation, or you are a paid lackey of big business.
    From Cambridge English Corpus
  • In sum, it is difficult to support just-deserts responsibility anywhere, but even traditional believers in just deserts and righteous retribution should have doubts about their application to medical care
    From Cambridge English Corpus 

1 The more things money can buy, the harder it is to be poor – Michael Sandel | Comment is Free

Gepubliceerd op 7 jan. 2015

 
Over the last few decades we’ve become a market society where almost everything is up for sale. Subscribe to The Guardian ► http://is.gd/subscribeguardian
 
There are cash incentives for doctors to diagnose dementia patients or for teachers if their students get better exam results. The problem, says Harvard philosopher Michael Sandel, is that where money determines access to fundamental necessities like health and education, inequality matters a lot more than it otherwise would.
 

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2 What Is Justice?: Crash Course Philosophy #40

Gepubliceerd op 19 dec. 2016

 
In today’s episode, Hank asks you to consider all the ways people talk about justice and what we really mean when we use that word. We’ll explain various theories of justice, just distribution, and different approaches to punishment.
 

3 Discrimination: Crash Course Philosophy #41

Gepubliceerd op 10 jan. 2017

 
Is it OK to discriminate? Do you do it? Is it always wrong or are there cases where it can be acceptable? Today we’re talking through several tricky cases and different philosophical perspectives on this issue.
 

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4 Inequality and Solidarity

Gepubliceerd op 11 apr. 2013

 
Debate on April 7, 2013: The financial crises and the rigorous austerity policies that followed after 2008 increased the level of inequality within European societies and among EU member states. New models of solidarity are in more demand than ever. On Sunday, April 7, Elsa Fornero (Italian Minister for Labour, Social Affairs and Equal Opportunities), Ira Katznelson (Prof. of Political Science and History, Columbia University), Michael Sandel (Prof. of Government, Harvard University) and Andreas Treichl (CEO, Erste Group) discussed at the almost sold out Vienna Burgtheater how to escape the crises and to promote new models of good life.

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5 Michael Sandel money & markets new

Gepubliceerd op 18 okt. 2016

 

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6 Michael Sandel: Populism, Trump, and the Future of Democracy

Gepubliceerd op 23 apr. 2018

 
PLEASE NOTE: THIS VIDEO IS AUDIO ONLY.
 
Like the triumph of Brexit in the UK, the election of Donald Trump was an angry verdict on decades of rising inequality and a version of globalization that benefits those at the top but leaves ordinary people feeling disempowered. In this lecture, renowned philosopher Michael Sandel argues that before mainstream parties can hope to win back public support, they should learn from the populist protest that has displaced them—not by replicating its xenophobia and strident nationalism, but by taking seriously the legitimate grievances with which these ugly sentiments are entangled. These grievances are not only economic but also moral and cultural; they are not only about wages and jobs but also about social esteem.
 

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7 Michael Sandel: From market economy to market society – IQ2 Talks

Gepubliceerd op 22 jun. 2012
Want to join the debate? Check out the Intelligence Squared website to hear about future live events and podcasts: http://www.intelligencesquared.com
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http://www.intelligencesquared.com/ev…

This event took place at the Royal Institution of Great Britain on 22nd May 2012.

Michael Sandel is one of the world’s most acclaimed and popular political philosophers. He has given the Reith lectures, been called “the most influential foreign figure of the year” by China Newsweek, and his online video lectures for Harvard University attract millions of viewers. His book Justice was an international bestseller.

Now he turns his attention to the markets. In this special Intelligence Squared event he discussed his provocative new book, ‘What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets’. Should we pay children to get good grades? Is it ethical to pay people to test risky new drugs or to donate their organs? What about hiring mercenaries to fight our wars, or selling citizenship to immigrants willing to pay? Isn’t there something wrong with a world in which everything is for sale?

Sandel argued that market values have crowded out nonmarket norms in almost every aspect of life – medicine, education, government, law, art, sports, even family life and personal relations. So what is the proper role of markets in a democratic society, and how can we protect the moral and civic goods that markets do not honour and money cannot buy? Come and hear Michael Sandel examine one of the biggest ethical questions of our time.

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8 Why Trump? What Now?: Michael Sandel at the Harvard Law Forum

Gepubliceerd op 5 apr. 2017
Two decades ago, in his book Democracy’s Discontent, Michael Sandel warned that, absent a stronger civic republican spirit, liberalism would collapse, giving way to “those who would shore up borders, harden the distinction between insiders and outsiders, and promise a politics to ‘take back our culture and take back our county.'”

On February 22, 2017, the Harvard Law School Forum hosted Sandel to give his take on politics in the age of Trump. Here is the full audio.

Contact Pete Davis at PeDavis@JD18.law.harvard.edu for more information on the Harvard Law Forum.

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9 Moral Pluralism

Gepubliceerd op 16 mrt. 2018

 
Philosopher Michael Sandel argues that the fact that we live in a morally pluralistic society shouldn’t deter us from seeking to create a political system based on the common good–even if there is widespread disagreement about what constitutes the common good.
 

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10 Interpreting the Bill of Rights

Gepubliceerd op 16 mrt. 2018

 
Philosopher Michael Sandel contrasts liberal and republican political philosophies, using historical interpretation of the Bill of Rights as a means by which to discuss the differing conceptions of freedom and citizenship that each of these philosophies affirms.
 

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11 ETYKA SOLIDARNOŚCI | 2017 | MICHAEL SANDEL

 
MICHAEL SANDEL | ETYKA SOLIDARNOŚCI 30 sierpnia 2017 ECS / Gdańsk
 
 

12 Michael J. Sandel at Yonsei University in Seoul, South Korea – 2012 June 1

Gepubliceerd op 9 jun. 2012

 
Michael J Sandel visited Yonsei University in Seoul, South Korea, to promote his book, “On What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets”. He was greeted by 13,000+ students and citizens eager to learn about this theme, and engage in a lively debate that is Sandel’s trademark as a professor that ‘artfully crafts’ his classes. This event further demonstrates South Korea’s values for education and democracy in the modern era and their widespread agreement that there are some things that money cannot buy.

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13 ‘Justice with Michael Sandel’ at Tohoku University #1/4

Gepubliceerd op 25 jun. 2014

 
On February 22 at the Kawauchi Hagi Hall (Tohoku University Centennial Hall), “Justice with Michael Sandel” was held with a total of around 1,100 participants including approximately 500 Tohoku University students.
 
Heated discussions were carried out as Professor Sandel posed questions such as whether one’s life or one’s duties were more important and whether strong leadership or consensus are needed for reconstruction efforts.
 

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14 ‘Justice with Michael Sandel’ at Tohoku University #2/4

Gepubliceerd op 24 jun. 2014

 
On February 22 at the Kawauchi Hagi Hall (Tohoku University Centennial Hall), “Justice with Michael Sandel” was held with a total of around 1,100 participants including approximately 500 Tohoku University students.
 
Heated discussions were carried out as Professor Sandel posed questions such as whether one’s life or one’s duties were more important and whether strong leadership or consensus are needed for reconstruction efforts.
 

15 ‘Justice with Michael Sandel’ at Tohoku University #3/4

Gepubliceerd op 24 jun. 2014

 
On February 22 at the Kawauchi Hagi Hall (Tohoku University Centennial Hall), “Justice with Michael Sandel” was held with a total of around 1,100 participants including approximately 500 Tohoku University students.
 
Heated discussions were carried out as Professor Sandel posed questions such as whether one’s life or one’s duties were more important and whether strong leadership or consensus are needed for reconstruction efforts.

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16 ‘Justice with Michael Sandel’ at Tohoku University #4/4

Gepubliceerd op 24 jun. 2014

 
On February 22 at the Kawauchi Hagi Hall (Tohoku University Centennial Hall), “Justice with Michael Sandel” was held with a total of around 1,100 participants including approximately 500 Tohoku University students.
 
Heated discussions were carried out as Professor Sandel posed questions such as whether one’s life or one’s duties were more important and whether strong leadership or consensus are needed for reconstruction efforts.
 

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17 Democratising Information, Justice, Equality and the Rule of Law

Gepubliceerd op 24 jan. 2013

 
Public Lecture on Democratising Information, Justice, Equality and the Rule of Law with Mr Sam Pitroda and Dr Michael Sandel delivered over National Knowledge Network (NKN) addressing Lakhs of students across India.
 

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18 Live Fish Market Practical Joke

8 apr. 2011

 
This fish market is so fresh, the fish is wiggling and jumping around. A presentation of the Just For Laughs Gags. The funny hidden camera pranks show for the whole family. Juste pour rire les gags, l’émission de caméra caché la plus comique de la télé!