Miscarriage of justice

A situation in which someone is punished by the law courts for a crime that they have not committed:

Many people oppose the death penalty because of the possibility of miscarriages of justice.

Cambridge Dictionary

  • In some instances a wrongful conviction is not overturned for several decades, or until after the innocent person has been executed, released from custody, or has died. 
  • Miscarriage of justice is sometimes synonymous with wrongful conviction, referring to a conviction reached in an unfair or disputed trial.

Een justitiële dwaling is een rechterlijke dwaling of een eenzijdige dwaling van een openbaar aanklager of de jury, waarbij iemand op wie geen schuld rust langdurig wordt vervolgd. Dwalingen kunnen bij alle misdrijven optreden.

The term travesty of justice is sometimes used for a gross, deliberate miscarriage of justice. Show trials (not in the sense of high publicity, but in the sense of lack of regard to the actual legal procedure and fairness), due to their character, often lead to such travesties.

The concept of miscarriage of justice has important implications for standard of review, in that an appellate court will often only exercise its discretion to correct plain error when a miscarriage of justice (or “manifest injustice”) would otherwise occur.

(Wikipedia)

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1 Sue Neill-Fraser: the worst miscarriage of justice in Australian history? | 60 Minutes Australia

11 mrt. 2020

Justice Overboard (2014)
 
Susan Neill-Fraser is behind bars – a grandmother convicted of murdering her partner, Bob Chappell. Convicted by a jury of her peers, she was sentenced to 23 years. But there’s one problem: Susan Neill- Fraser is innocent. That’s the unqualified conclusion of some of the finest legal minds in the country, including our leading expert in miscarriages of justice. Charles Wooley first looked at Susan’s case a year ago, and was convinced there was enough reasonable doubt to acquit her at trial. Now, the case to set her free is even stronger, if not undeniable, thanks to the new and compelling forensic evidence which 60 Minutes will reveal for the first time.
 
For forty years, 60 Minutes have been telling Australians the world’s greatest stories. Tales that changed history, our nation and our lives. Reporters Liz Hayes, Allison Langdon, Tara Brown, Charles Wooley, Liam Bartlett and Sarah Abo look past the headlines because there is always a bigger picture. Sundays are for 60 Minutes.
 
 
IMPORTANT CONTENT
 

2 Witness to Bob Chappell murder breaks 10 year silence | 60 Minutes Australia

10 mrt. 2019

Meaghan Vass has lived a wretched existence. For half of her 25 years her home has been the streets, where she mixed with the wrong crowd and became addicted to heavy drugs. But as down and out as she is, Meaghan could be the most important witness in Tasmania’s most controversial murder case. Nine years ago Sue Neill-Fraser was jailed for the murder of her partner Bob Chappell on their yacht, Four Winds. She has always denied she did it, pleading that she wasn’t even on the boat when he was killed. And that’s where Meaghan Vass comes in. In a 60 MINUTES special investigation she speaks publicly for the first time and admits to being on board the Four Winds at the time of the murder. She tells Liam Bartlett she saw everything, and reveals who killed Bob Chappell and why. Sue Neill-Fraser’s freedom rests on Meaghan Vass’s evidence. But is she believable?
 
For forty years, 60 Minutes have been telling Australians the world’s greatest stories. Tales that changed history, our nation and our lives. Reporters Liz Hayes, Allison Langdon, Tara Brown, Charles Wooley, Liam Bartlett and Sarah Abo look past the headlines because there is always a bigger picture. Sundays are for 60 Minutes.
 
IMPORTANT CONTENT
 

2 What is MISCARRIAGE OF JUSTICE? What does MICARRIAGE OF JUSTICE mean?

15 aug. 2016

 
✪✪✪✪✪ http://www.theaudiopedia.com ✪✪✪✪✪

What is MISCARRIAGE OF JUSTICE? What does MISCARRIAGE OF JUSTICE mean?

A miscarriage of justice primarily is the conviction and punishment of a person for a crime they did not commit. The term can also apply to errors in the other direction—”errors of impunity”, and to civil cases. Most criminal justice systems have some means to overturn, or “quash”, a wrongful conviction, but this is often difficult to achieve. In some instances a wrongful conviction is not overturned for several years, or until after the innocent person has been executed, released from custody, or has died.

“Miscarriage of justice” is sometimes synonymous with wrongful conviction, referring to a conviction reached in an unfair or disputed trial. Wrongful convictions are frequently cited by death penalty opponents as cause to eliminate death penalties to avoid executing innocent persons. In recent years, DNA evidence has been used to clear many people falsely convicted.

The Scandinavian languages (viz. Danish, Norwegian and Swedish) have a word, the Swedish variant of which is justitiemord, which literally translates as “justice murder.” The term exists in several languages and was originally used for cases where the accused was convicted, executed, and later cleared after death. While a miscarriage of justice is a Type I error for falsely identifying culpability, an error of impunity would be a Type II error of failing to find a culpable person guilty. However, the term “miscarriage of justice” is often used to describe the latter type as well.

With capital punishment decreasing, the expression has acquired an extended meaning, namely any conviction for a crime not committed by the convicted. The retention of the term “murder” represents both universal abhorrence against wrongful convictions and awareness of how destructive wrongful convictions are. Some Slavic languages have also the word (justičná vražda in Slovak, justiční vražda in Czech) which literally translates as “justice murder”, but it is used for Judicial murder, while miscarriage of justice is “justiční omyl” in Czech, implying an error of the justice system, not a deliberate manipulation.

Also, the term travesty of justice is sometimes used for a gross, deliberate miscarriage of justice. Show trials (not in the sense of high publicity, but in the sense of lack of regard to the actual legal procedure and fairness), due to their character, often lead to such travesties.

The concept of miscarriage of justice has important implications for standard of review, in that an appellate court will often only exercise its discretion to correct plain error when a miscarriage of justice (or “manifest injustice”) would otherwise occur.

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3 We explain Miscarriage of Justice – mysimpleshow

13 sep. 2016

Miscarriage of Justice means the wrongful conviction and punishment of a person for a crime he or she did not commit. The legal term has been around for about 100 years. Learn about what miscarriage of justice entails in this explainer video.
 

Wanneer je deel 4 van de BBC website Robert Jones wrongfully convicted leest, nopens intentionele fouten en wanneer je ziet dat er een patroon is van tekortkomingen is, dan is de boodschap dat men daar dient aandacht voor te hebben, namelijk wanneer je aanvoelt dat er iets niet klopt in een oordeel of beslissing.

Het patroon die aan de oppervlakte kwam naar aanleiding van Liam Allan, nopens het achterhouden van gegevens, is een element waarmee men makkelijk een zaak kan ontwrichten, om een fout oordeel te krijgen.

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4 Miscarriages of Justice

In première gegaan op 30 jan. 2020

 

5 Wrongly Convicted Richard Rosario Stuns Judge at Hearing | NBC Nightly News

Gepubliceerd op 24 jun. 2016

Richard Rosario asked a judge not to throw out the case against him, telling NBC News in an exclusive interview that he is determined to expose how the justice system went wrong.
 

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6 Wrongly Convicted Richard Rosario Stuns Judge at Hearing | NBC Nightly News

25 jun. 2016

Richard Rosario asked a judge not to throw out the case against him, telling NBC News in an exclusive interview that he is determined to expose how the justice system went wrong.
 
 

7 Justice Incarcerated, The Frederick Freeman Story

Gepubliceerd op 8 mei 2012

 
Fredrick Freeman was 465 miles away when Scott Macklem was gun downed execution style, in 1987. No physical evidence placed him at the crime scene. St. Clair County Prosecutor ( Now a federal Judge) Robert Cleland used the testimony of an inmate snitch to secure a conviction.
 
 

8 Wrongly Imprisoned: How Fair is Uk Justice

4 mrt. 2009

Robert Brown face 25 years imprisoned for a crime he didn’t commit, framed by crooked cops and left to rot – but he never gave up. He was released after 25 years after his conviction was deemed unsafe and him innocent – a changed man with a quarter of a century lost.
 

3. Picking Up The Pieces (False Imprisonment Documentary) – Real Stories

Gepubliceerd op 17 mrt. 2017

Check out our new website for more incredible documentaries: HD and ad-free.
 
Robert Brown is Britain’s longest-serving miscarriage of justice victim. At 19 he received a life sentence for a murder he did not commit. After two failed appeals, his conviction was finally overturned in December 2002. This film follows Robert after his release as he tries to rebuild his life.
 
Want to watch more full-length Documentaries? Click here: http://bit.ly/1GOzpIu

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9 What is ROBERT BROWN CASE? What does ROBERT BROWN CASE mean? ROBERT BROWN CASE meaning

8 jun. 2018

http://www.theaudiopedia.com ✪✪✪✪✪

What is ROBERT BROWN CASE? What does ROBERT BROWN CASE mean? ROBERT BROWN CASE meaning – ROBERT BROWN CASE definition – ROBERT BROWN CASE explanation.

Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/… license.

Robert Brown is a Scottish man who spent 25 years in jail for a crime he did not commit. In January 1977, Annie Walsh was beaten to death in her home in Manchester, England and Brown was first interrogated and beaten by the police officers investigating this crime. Under duress, Brown signed a confession and was found guilty at trial. He maintained his innocence throughout his prison sentence even going so far as denying himself parole by not admitting to the crime. He was released on appeal in 2002 and is thought to be one of the longest serving victims of a miscarriage of justice in the United Kingdom.

Brown grew up in Kilbowie in Dumbartonshire and was placed into care when he was nine years old by his mother after he witnessed his dad beating her up. At the age of 15 he took himself out of care and returned home where he and his father “came to blows”. His dad threw him out soon afterwards. Brown admits that he partook in a life of petty crime. He later moved to Manchester to make “a fresh start” after going to a football match in the city. Whilst in Manchester he met a girl, Cathy Shaw, who later became his girlfriend.

On 31 January 1977, factory worker Annie Walsh, who was 51 at the time, was found battered to death in her flat in Charles Berry Crescent, Hulme, Greater Manchester by a man who had come to read the electricity meter. She had been hit over the head sixteen times and her blood was splattered over the furniture, walls and ceiling. A Home Office pathologist estimated that she had lain undiscovered for two to three days after the murder, (she was last seen alive on 28 January 1977). Police were so concerned about the frenzied nature of the attack that they consulted mental units in case someone had escaped.

In May 1977, the police went to the flat that Brown shared with his girlfriend Cathy; it was in the same block of flats where Annie Walsh had lived and been murdered. He was originally arrested for non-payment of a fine and was taken in for questioning without his rights being read to him and held for 32 hours without legal representation. At the trial, Brown stated that the confession was beaten and coerced out of him and when he did ask for a lawyer, he was told by the policemen that “only guilty men need a lawyer”.

The trial was presided over by Judge Helenus Milmo who directed the jury’s attention to the fact that it came down to whether or not they believed the police, or whether they believed Brown was innocent. The jury convicted Brown of murder and Judge Milmo sentenced him to life with a minimum term of 15 years.

Brown appealed the sentencing in 1978, but the appeal was turned down. An appeal was lodged again with then Home Secretary, Michael Howard in 1993, but this was also denied in the following year.

Whilst in prison, Brown was caught in what Simon Hattenstone, writing in The Guardian, describes as “the Miscarriage of Justice Catch-22” (the Innocent prisoner’s dilemma); because he would not admit his guilt in the crime for which he was imprisoned, he could not be rehabilitated and be deemed fit to be put in front of a parole board. Brown refused the chance of parole from a point of view that investigative journalist Eamonn O’Neill called a point of logic; “how could he be paroled for a crime that he did not commit?”.

Whilst in prison, Brown shared a cell with Paul Hill, one of the Guildford Four, who, after having his conviction quashed and then released, later campaigned against Brown’s miscarriage of justice. The case was again referred to the Court of Appeal in 2002 by the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC).

An appeal court in November 2002 decided that Brown should be allowed to go free after declaring his conviction unsafe. The appeal was due to be heard over two days, but the judges at the Royal Courts of Justice in London, quashed the conviction within minutes when the Counsel for the Crown explained that he could not argue the case on the evidence presented before the court; the appeal lasted only 18 minutes before it was deemed an ‘unsafe conviction’…..
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Creative Commons-licentie – Naamsvermelding (hergebruik toegestaan)

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10 Men set free after 30 years in prison

CNN

 

Gepubliceerd op 3 sep. 2014

 
Two men, one on death row for 30 years, are free from prison after being cleared by DNA evidence. George Howell reports. More from CNN at http://www.cnn.com/
 

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11 – 30-Year Death Row Inmate Celebrates First Days of Freedom

Anthony Ray Hinton learns to re-adjust to a new life in a world with computers and social media.

 

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12 Oklahoma Man Fights Death Sentence Day Before Execution Date

Gepubliceerd op 30 sep. 2015

 
Richard Glossip is set to be executed by lethal injection on Sept. 30 for a murder he claims he is innocent of.
 

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13 Surviving Execution: A Year In The Death Of Richard Glossip

Gepubliceerd op 27 dec. 2015

 
Sky’s Ian Woods follows the case of Richard Glossip – a death row prisoner facing execution for a murder committed by someone else.
 

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14 Man in prison for 17 years set free after his lookalike is found | ABC News

Gepubliceerd op 13 jun. 2017

 
Richard Jones had been charged with aggravated robbery in Kansas City, Kansas, nearly 20 years ago.
 

15 A Wrongful Murder Conviction and 18-Year Fight for Justice: The Fairbanks Four

Gepubliceerd op 1 feb. 2018

In 1997, a teenager was found beaten to death in downtown Fairbanks, Alaska. Police quickly pinned the murder on four native teens from a local high school and convicted them on false confessions, an unreliable witness, and forged evidence. Still, the “Fairbanks Four” continued to maintain their innocence. Over time, the fight for their freedom grew into a statewide movement against Alaska’s judicial system. After 18 years, the Fairbanks Four were set free—but the state still refuses to acknowledge any wrongdoing. Meanwhile, the wrongfully convicted men, who were thrown in prison as teenagers, are struggling to get used to life outside after nearly two decades behind bars. VICE trekked to Alaska to meet two members of the Fairbanks Four, the community members who rallied behind them, and the investigators who helped secure their freedom—exploring the enduring impact of their wrongful incarceration and the native community’s effort to move forward. WATCH NEXT: Murder at America’s Border, the Story of an Anti-Immigration Vigilante –

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16 Falsely Accused of Rape, Former High School Football Star Finally Cleared

 

Gepubliceerd op 24 mei 2012

LONG BEACH, Calif. (KABC) — After a decade, it was the judgment that Brian Banks and his lawyers from the California Innocence Project fought for: Case dismissed. “My only dream in the world was to just be free and to have the same opportunity as everybody here,” said Banks following Thursday’s hearing. At age 16, Brian Banks had been a popular student at Polytechnic High in Long Beach, an athlete being scouted by eight colleges. He verbally accepted an offer to attend the University of Southern California on a four-year scholarship when a serious accusation came from a fellow classmate and childhood friend. Wanetta Gibson, then 15 years old, claimed Banks had raped her at school. With a case of he said she said, Banks did as his lawyers urged — to plead no contest and accept a short prison term rather than risk a long one. Gibson collected $1.5 million after suing the school. Banks spent five years in prison and five years on parole, finally reaching out to California Project Innocence. But the case turned when the alleged victim contacted him through Facebook asking to be his friend.

 

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17 Wrongfully Jailed For Rape As A Teen, He Now Helps Others Falsely Convicted | Megyn Kelly TODAY

Gepubliceerd op 9 jan. 2018

 
Accused of rape by a fellow student, Brian Banks accepted a plea deal and went to prison on his 18th birthday. Years later he was exonerated with the help of the California Innocence Project. He’s joined on Megyn Kelly TODAY by Project director Justin Brooks and former prosecutor Loni Coombs, with whom he now examines other potentially wrongful convictions on the series “Final Appeal.”
 

18 A Wrongful Conviction ‘Destroyed’ This Man’s Life

Gepubliceerd op 11 aug. 2016

 
Dion Harrell was convicted of rape in 199. Over 20 years later, DNA proved his innocence and cleared his record, but not after prison and years of living on the sex offender registry destroyed his life.
 

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19 A Story of Wrongful Conviction: Terry Olson (extended)

Gepubliceerd op 24 okt. 2016

 
Convicted in 2007 due to false testimony about an alleged murder that took place in 1979, Terry Olson spent 11 years in prison until being freed due to the work of the Innocence Project of Minnesota and Attorney David Schultz. This documentary reveals more of Terry’s first hours of freedom, the touching family reunion and more of his Press Conference held in Minneapolis a few days later. Produced by ANDVD Media. HD
 

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20 Cuffed Without Cause (Extra Scene from ‘Driving While Black’)

Gepubliceerd op 20 apr. 2016

Watch the Full Length – http://bit.ly/1WDWBVr 
 
A report from Seton Hall Law School Center for Policy & Research has found that in the majority-white municipality of Bloomfield, New Jersey, nearly 80 percent of traffic tickets are issued to African American and Latino drivers. The report also found that most tickets were issued to non-resident minority drivers passing through town, suggesting a “de facto border patrol” policing policy is in effect. The Bloomfield Police Department — which has begun collecting data on the race of drivers in traffic stops as of January 2016 — rejects the report’s findings. Jason Castle is a councilman-at-large for the Township of Teaneck, New Jersey. In 2012, Castle was detained by New Jersey state troopers near Englewood after he pulled over to change the settings on his car’s GPS. His warrant stated that he had refused a breathalyzer test. Eight months later, Castle’s charges were dismissed when the state failed to supply evidence of an offense or provide him with a speedy trial. VICE News sat down with Castle to hear why he believes he was mistreated and denied his rights by law enforcement.
 
 

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21 Raphael Rowe

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22 Life After Being Wrongfully Imprisoned

Gepubliceerd op 25 mei 2016

 
Season 7, Episode 18: “SoCal Connected” tells the moving stories of two innocent men who spent years behind bars for murders they did not commit, and their attempt to receive compensation for their time in prison. http://bit.ly/1Xvn33R
 
 

23 The System – Flawed Forensics

Al Jazeera English

 Gepubliceerd op 7 jan. 2015
 
The uncovering of faulty forensic analysis by the FBI 20 years ago means that two men have a second chance at proving their innocence.
 

24 Teen Wrongly Convicted for Murder, Freed After 9 Years

Gepubliceerd op 8 jun. 2016

.
A Detroit man who was incarcerated after being wrongly convicted of four murders is walking free today, after serving nearly nine years of a sentence he received at the age of 15. The murder convictions for Davontae Sanford, now 23, have been vacated by Judge Brian Sullivan, and all charges dropped against him, Maria Miller, an assistant prosecuting attorney at the Wayne County Prosecutor’s Office, told ABC News today.

 

 

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25 Davontae Sanford: ‘All I Really Wanted Was My Freedom’ | NBC News

Gepubliceerd op 9 jun. 2016

 
23-year-old Davontae Sanford, just freed from jail for killing four people when he was 14, tells the media that he’s not about to “play the blame game, that I’m out, and that’s all I wanted.” Although a family friend takes the prosecutor, and police to task over for not working faster to free Davontae.
 

26 Detroit man wrongly imprisoned for drug killings released

Gepubliceerd op 9 jun. 2016

 
After spending nearly a decade in prison for a crime he did not commit, 23-year-old Davontae Sanford was freed Wednesday after a judge vacated his murder conviction. Michelle Miller reports.

 

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27 Wrongfully accused man freed from prison

Gepubliceerd op 8 jun. 2016

 
An innocent teenager who was thrown into prison 8 years ago walked out of prison Wednesday. Michelle Miller has more.
 

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28 Man Wrongfully Convicted Of Murder At 14-Years-Old Is Set Free | NBC News

Gepubliceerd op 14 mei 2018

 
A Missouri man hopes to walk out of prison today after serving nearly two decades for a murder he did not commit. David Robinson was kept behind bars even though another man confessed to the crime in 2004. “48 Hours” correspondent Erin Moriarty reports.
 

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29 Wrongfully Convicted Man Set Free 9 Years Later

Gepubliceerd op 9 jun. 2016

 
Davontae Sanford, 23, was convicted at age 14 for a crime to which his lawyer says he was coerced into confessing.
 

30 Davontae Sanford speaks with media

Gepubliceerd op 9 jun. 2016

Davontae Sanford speaks with the media a day after being released from prison where he was sent after being wrongfully convicted of murder.

 

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31 Teen Wrongly Convicted Of Quadruple Murder – Crime Watch Daily With Chris Hansen (Pt 3)

Gepubliceerd op 9 mrt. 2017

 
Davonte Sanford, a half-blind, special needs 14-year-old, was convicted of four murders in Detroit. Sanford confessed to committing the murders as a teen, but a self-described hitman named Vincent “Vito” Smothers said that he was the one who killed the four people. Even after this revelation, Sanford was not immediately freed from prison. Crime Watch Daily’s Andrea Isom speaks with Davontae’s mother Taminko Sanford and Davonte himself about what happened.

 

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32 Davontae Sanford: Paula Tutman sits down with family

Gepubliceerd op 5 apr. 2018

Paula Tutman has some of the interview with Davontae Sanford and his mother.

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33 Davontae Sanford presented with Spirit of Detroit award

Gepubliceerd op 28 mrt. 2017
 

Davontae Sanford presented with Spirit of Detroit award

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34 Wrongfully convicted Missouri man released from prison after nearly 18 years

Gepubliceerd op 15 mei 2018

 
A Missouri man imprisoned for nearly two decades for a murder he didn’t commit is now free. An emotional David Robinson walked out of prison Monday night after Missouri’s attorney general and local prosecutors dismissed charges against him. “48 Hours” correspondent Erin Moriarty shows the difficult path to Robinson’s freedom.

 

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35 Wrongfully convicted Tenn. man fights for compensation after 31 years in prison

Gepubliceerd op 12 dec. 2016

 
Lawrence McKinney was convicted of rape in 1978 and spent over 31 years in prison until DNA evidence proved he was innocent in 2009. Under Tennessee law, McKinney may be owed up to $1 million for the wrongful imprisonment. But the state’s parole board has refused to exonerate him, despite the evidence, reports Omar Villafranca.
 

36 After 17 years in prison, wrongfully convicted man walks free

 

Gepubliceerd op 25 jun. 2014

After spending 17 years in prison for an attempted rape he did not commit, Nathan Brown is now a free man. Subscribe to WDSU on YouTube now for more: http://bit.ly/1n00vnY
 

37 Did Texas execute a wrongly convicted man?

Gepubliceerd op 4 mrt. 2014

 
Cameron Todd Willingham was convicted of setting his house on fire in 1991 and murdering his three young daughters in Texas, and subsequently executed ten years ago. The execution came despite pleas from family members and death penalty opponents that Willingham was innocent. But now newly discovered evidence shows that Willingham may not, in fact, have started the fire. RT’s Ameera David talks to Bryce Benjet, staff attorney for the Innocence Project, about what went wrong in the case that Texas may have executed an innocent man.

 

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38 CNN AC360 on Todd Willingham Execution and Rick Perry’s Cover Up – Oct 13, 2009

Gepubliceerd op 13 okt. 2009
http://camerontoddwillingham.com/?pag…

Sign a petition to Governor Rick Perry and the State of Texas to acknowledge that the fire in the Cameron Todd Willingham case was not arson, therefore no crime was committed and on February 17, 2004, Texas executed an innocent man.

 

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39 CNN AC360 Oct 15, 2009 Part 2/2: Todd Willingham’s Defense Attorney Disgraces Texas Justice

stopexecutions
Gepubliceerd op 16 okt. 2009
http://camerontoddwillingham.com/?pag…

Sign a petition to Governor Rick Perry and the State of Texas to acknowledge that the fire in the Cameron Todd Willingham case was not arson, therefore no crime was committed and on February 17, 2004, Texas executed an innocent man.

Tonight on CNN AC360, Todd Willingham’s trial lawyer David Martin, the person who was supposed to have vigorously defended his client, made an appearance on national TV arguing for his former client’s guilt. Martin, appearing in a cowboy hat, drawled that the report submitted to the Texas Forensic Science Commission by Dr Craig Beyler was one of the “least objective reports” he has ever read. “This is supposed to be a scientific report?”, said Martin.
Steve Mills of the Chicago Tribune, then said that the arson investigation methods used in 1991 were not based on science. “That is absurd” said Martin.

You have to see the shocking video of Martin’s appearance. This shows why the Texas death penalty system can allow innocent people to be executed. Willingham did not have a chance with Martin as his lawyer. Anderson Cooper at one point said, “you sound like a sheriff”, “you don’t sound like a defense lawyer”.

Martin said, “this is riduculous. This is absurd. The defense lawyer doesn’t have to believe the client. This is an absurdity.”

youtert
How the hell does a defense lawyer go around saying his clients are guilty? He should be disbarred.
 
 
Jason S.
So a man without two cents to his name got stuck with an incompetent defense attorney in a death penalty case.  This happens all the time in capital punishment cases so it is hardly surprising.  What we should be more outraged by is a Texas governor who, when presented with conclusive evidence that the fire was not arson, was more concerned with re-election than with stopping the state’s murder of an innocent man.  Likewise, we should be disgusted with the prosecutor who encouraged a jailhouse informant to lie on the stand in Willingham’s trial in exchange for early release from prison.  I say this not in defense of Willingham’s lawyer who was clearly incompetent.  Rather, it is about putting the blame where it clearly belongs, which is on the state of Texas for their abuse of power resulting in murder.  . 

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40 People Who Were Wrongly Accused Of Murder

Gepubliceerd op 3 jan. 2018

 
Who spent 25 years for a murder in New York, even though he was in Florida? Who was wrongfully executed for a crime committed by a man with the same first name? Here are 15 times people were wrongly accused – and convicted – of murder Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/planetdolan
 

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41 Man wrongfully convicted of murder sues Detroit and former detective

 

Gepubliceerd op 12 dec. 2018

 
Man wrongfully convicted of murder sues Detroit and former detective
 
 

42 Innocent man freed after 26 years

Gepubliceerd op 16 jul. 2012

 
Full story: http://bit.ly/NvQPAQ David Lee Gavitt spent 26 years in prison, accused of murdering his wife and two young daughters in a house fire. Last month, he walked out of prison, exonerated by new fire science.
 

43 Derek Bromley Miscarriage of Justice Part 1

Gepubliceerd op 27 mei 2014

Spending 28 years behind bars for a crime you didn’t commit would be a fate worse than death and that’s what Adelaide prisoner Derek Bromley claims has happened to him.

While the drowning murder of Stephen Docosa in 1984 was presented as an open and shut case, as you’re about to see it’s far from it. Graham Archer reports.

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44 Exonerated Anthony Graves Strives to Overturn Wrongful Convictions

Gepubliceerd op 17 mrt. 2016

 
Anthony Graves, who was exonerated after serving 18 years on death row for a murder he didn’t commit, is using compensation given to him by the state of Texas to fight for prisoners who believe they’ve been wrongly convicted. The Anthony Graves Foundation is based in Houston, Texas. Video by Ashley Landis
 

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45 Remarks of Anthony Graves, Founder, Anthony Believes

Gepubliceerd op 19 jun. 2012

 
[WASHINGTON, D.C.] Anthony Graves, who spent 18 years incarcerated and in solitary confinement before he was exonerated, testified at a hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Human Rights chaired by U.S. Senator Dick Durbin (D-IL). As a death row inmate, Mr. Graves was placed in solitary confinement, where he was subjected to sleep deprivation, total isolation, and lasting health issues.
 
 
mosipd
This is only but one of the major problems that is wrong with this country today. With approximately 2.8 million people behind bars, we incarcerate more people than any other country by a large margin. We offer up some of the harshest laws in any first world country with almost no possibility of rehabilitation and reintegration. I urge everyone who watched this short video to research the prison conditions and judicial systems of other countries and compare them to our own. It’s a real eye opening experience of just how bad a for profit prison industry can become.
 

 

 

46 Gideon v. Wainwright – Speaker Anthony Graves, an exonerated death row prisoner from Texas

Gepubliceerd op 19 jan. 2013
The 50th Anniversary of Gideon v. Wainwright – Presented by the American Bar Association Section of Litigation
Friday, January 18, 2013 / 10:30 am — 12:00 pm EST

A program commemorating the 50th anniversary of the landmark decision, Gideon v. Wainwright will be live streamed on January 18, 2013. This decision recognized a constitutional right to the appointment of counsel for indigent criminal defendants charged with felonies. Mr. Gideon was in prison when he submitted his handwritten petition to the U.S. Supreme Court requesting counsel.

Speakers include:

Professor Bruce Jacobs, Dean Emeritus and Professor of Criminal Law at Stetson Law School, Anthony Lewis, Journalist, Author, and Academic, the Honorable Carlos Martinez of the 11th Judicial Circuit of Florida (Miami-Dade
County and Anthony Graves, an exonerated death row prisoner from Texas. Moderating will be Joanne A. Epps, Dean of Temple Beasley School of Law.

 

VERY IMPORTANT CONTENT


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47 Freed Texas Death Row Prisoner Anthony Graves on Surviving Torture of Solitary Confinement

22 jun. 2012

DemocracyNow.org – In a rare interview, former Texas death row prisoner Anthony Graves joins us to recount his experience in solitary confinement, and how he was fully exonerated and released from prison in 2010. Graves was convicted in 1994 of assisting Robert Carter, a man he barely knew, in the brutal murders of six people. There was no physical evidence linking Graves to the crime, and his conviction relied primarily on Carter’s testimony. Before he was executed, Carter twice admitted he had lied about Graves’s involvement in the crime. In 2006, an appeals court overturned Graves’s conviction and ordered a new trial, saying prosecutors had elicited false statements and withheld testimony. After 18 years in prison, most of them on death row, Graves was exonerated and reunited with his family after a special prosecutor concluded he was an innocent man. Graves is now an active member of the movement to abolish the death penalty. “My experience was hell,” Graves says. “I always liken it to something that you would consider to be your worst nightmare. I had to go through that experience every day for 18-and-a-half years and it was just no way to live.” Urging an end to the death penalty, Graves says: “They’re killing in your name, and I say to you stand up and tell these people, ‘Not in my name anymore.'”
 
Watch part 1 of our interview with Anthony Graves and journalist James Ridgeway: http://youtu.be/8O-gX9mtEg8

To watch the complete weekday independent news hour, read the transcript, download the podcast, search our vast archive, or to find more information about Democracy Now! and Amy Goodman, visit http://www.democracynow.org/
 

48 Miscarriages of Justice ~Dowaliby Case~ Tunnel Vision – Part 1 of (3)

23 aug. 2010

A young girl goes missing from her home and is found dead. The father becomes the suspect despite there being no clear motive.
 

49 Miscarriages of Justice ~Dowaliby Case~ Tunnel Vision – Part 2 of (3)

23 aug. 2010

Miscarriages of Justice ~Dowaliby Case~ Tunnel Vision – Part 2 of (3)
 

50 Miscarriages of Justice ~Dowaliby Case~ Tunnel Vision – Part 3 of (3)

23 aug. 2010

Miscarriages of Justice ~Dowaliby Case~ Tunnel Vision – Part 3 of (3)
 

51 Miscarriages of Justice ~ John Thomson ~ Frame up – Part 1 of (2)

23 aug. 2010

Miscarriages of Justice ~ John Thomson ~ Frame up – Part 1 of (2) Framed for the murder of a man by two so called friends. John Thomson was used like a mule by unscrupulous villains,and unwittingly came into possession of a gun that was used in a murder of Man. Then when police closed in, his friends snitched him up to Frame him. Then the DA made his trial a certain wrongful conviction by clever legalise. First 20 min missed. Will update later.
 

52 Miscarriages of Justice ~ John Thomson ~ Frame up – Part 2 of (2)

23 aug. 2010

Miscarriages of Justice ~ John Thomson ~ Frame up – Part 2 of (2)
 

53 Miscarriage of Justice – a Survivor’s Story by the CCRC

14 mei 2018

The CCRC made this video with Michael O’Brien
 

54 Miscarriage of Justice

12 okt. 2015

Dr Kate Baker for over 50yrs is still to this day locked in legal battles with the british justice system. Not only has she had to deal with the miscarriage of justice, but also the worry of where this will all eventually lead… “will it ever end” says Dr Kate Baker!
 

55 Live Worms Served at Restaurant Prank

13 sep. 2016

Filmed in Montreal, Quebec

Welcome to the world-famous Just for Laughs Gags channel, where we pull public pranks on unsuspecting Montreal residents and tourists.

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