A fair procedure

The simplest way of understanding justice is giving people what they deserve. This idea goes back to Aristotle. The real difficulty begins with figuring out who deserves what and why. Michael Sandel.

The essential nature of deciding justice


Injustice is first of all the impact it has, it is a deciding moment for the rest of your life.

It is the worst thing that you can experience.
Only then, at that moment you can feel what is happening.

Injustice is a feeling impossible to put into words.
There has to be a balance in the decision making – a fair procedure – to avoid possible mistakes
It is hard to answer the question what justice requires.
It is very hard to argue about justice without first to argue about the purpose.

Aristotle

Talk to Al Jazeera – Professor Michael Sandel

16 okt. 2011

Al Jazeera’s Tony Harris interviews Professor Michael Sandel of Harvard University, Boston whose courses have become an international phenomenon.

At Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless.’

Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels.

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What is Justice?
Michael Sandel 2011 Al Jazeera Interview

Al Jazeera’s Tony Harris interviews Professor Michael Sandel of Harvard University, Boston whose courses have become an international phenomenon. Sandel talks about


What is justice,
What is right and what is wrong and
How it is connected to the concept of freedom.

CHAPITRES & ANNOTATIONS
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Introduction
01 min 29 s 3 annotations

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What is justice?
00 min 31 s 2 annotations

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Is justice the same wherever you go in the world?
00 min 40 s 1 annotations

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Do we have an intuitive sense of what’s right and what’s wrong?
00 min 50 s 0 annotations

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The unfairness in economy
03 min 24 s 8 annotations

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A lack of serious debate about moral issues
01 min 45 s 3 annotations

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Sandel’s thought about the “Arab Spring”
03 min 13 s 2 annotations

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The growing gap between rich and poors
03 min 12 s 5 annotations

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Does Sandel see the potential for poor people in America to rise up?
02 min 54 s 6 annotations

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What means to think critically?
02 min 59 s 1 annotations

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Sandel’s judgement on the American policy in the world after 9/11?
04 min 10 s 0 annotations

1
Introduction
01 min 29 s 3 annotations

Michael Sandel at Harvard
00:00:09 Chapter 1

Michael Sandel on wikipedia
00:00:12 Chapter 1

Justice with Michael Sandel (online courses)
00:00:15 Chapter 1

In matters of truth and justice there is no difference between large and small problems, for issues concerning the treatment of people are all the same. Albert Einstein.

Wrongfully Convicted: Flawed Autopsies Send Two Innocent Men To Jail

NPR
 
Gepubliceerd op 2 feb. 2011
 
Two Mississippi men spent a combined 30 years in prison for crimes they didn’t commit. They were separately charged with sexually assaulting and murdering two 3-year-old girls — in two separate crimes — two years apart. The pathologist who conducted both autopsies said he suspected the girls had been bitten. They were innocent.

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10 Wrongfully Convicted: Flawed Autopsies Send Two Innocent Men To Jail

2 feb. 2011

 
Two Mississippi men spent a combined 30 years in prison for crimes they didn’t commit. They were separately charged with sexually assaulting and murdering two 3-year-old girls — in two separate crimes — two years apart. The pathologist who conducted both autopsies said he suspected the girls had been bitten. They were innocent.