Rough Justice

Rough justice/luck

Something that happens to you that is severe or unfair:

It seems like rough justice that he should lose his house as well as his wife.

Cambridge Dictionary

If you describe someone’s treatment or punishment as rough justice, you mean that it is not given according to the law.

[British]
Trial by television makes for very rough justice indeed.

Collins Cobuild

1 BBC Rough Justice – The Usual Suspect

Gepubliceerd op 9 apr. 2018
Rough Justice

The Usual Suspect
In 1992, Paul Berry was found guilty of an armed robbery on a building society in Old Colwyn, North Wales.
Eye-witnesses said he was the man who held two elderly women cashiers at knife point. But Rough Justice has uncovered evidence which suggests the case against him was far less routine than it appeared.
The programme reveals that Paul Berry had an alibi which the police could only break by testimony from a convicted conman. Rough Justice found that the police broke nearly every rule in the book in building their case against Paul Berry, including contaminating the identification evidence that helped to convict him.

The problem with being an Eyewitness, an example: an incident where 3 lads wer causing trouble on an estate and started a fire I didn’t get a good look at them, only one really and described them as black My Nigerian Neighbour described them as white, I don’t know how good a view she got we were confused at our different descriptions.. When I saw them again I realized my mistake the Leader was a half-caste boy with lines cut into his eyebrows, he was the one I got a good view of and recognised him, the other two wer White but looked Turkish or similar, dark skin, not Anglo, I realised my description was completely wrong and the Nigerian woman’s was only very slightly better.
 
IMPORTANT CONTENT
 

2 Rough Justice – The Case of the Confused Chemicals 1983

Gepubliceerd op 8 jan. 2018

 
The Case of the Confused Chemicals (first broadcast 2 November 1983) – reinvestigation of the conviction of Ernie Clarke for the murder of Eileen McDougall, whose body was found nine years after her death in a petroleum storage tank at South Shields, Tyne and Wear.
 
IMPORTANT CONTENT
 

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3 Rough Justice

Gepubliceerd op 14 aug. 2012

 
Dateline reports on the punishment attacks and killings of suspected drug dealers, which are adding to the long-standing divide in Londonderry, Northern Ireland.
 

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4 Retrial by TV: The Rise and Fall of Rough Justice 1/4

Gepubliceerd op 7 apr. 2011
It is almost exactly 30 years since the BBC’s Rough Justice team began investigating miscarriages of justice. The programme can claim to have achieved the overturning of the convictions of 18 people in 13 separate cases, continuing sporadically for over 25 years until it was finally axed in November 2007.

Timeshift looks at the creation of this extraordinary series and reveals what a shock to the system it was. Featuring contributions from many of those involved, it asks how it was that a television programme took it upon itself to question one of the oldest judicial systems in the world.

This documentary is also an opportunity to look at how much television and journalism have changed since Rough Justice was first commissioned. The programme’s makers were hired with an open-ended brief that would be almost impossible to repeat today. It may only be thirty years ago, but this is a glimpse into a bygone era.

 

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5 Retrial by TV: The Rise and Fall of Rough Justice 2/4

 

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6 Retrial by TV: The Rise and Fall of Rough Justice 3/4

 

 

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7 Retrial by TV: The Rise and Fall of Rough Justice 4/4

 

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8 Re-trial by TV: The Rise and Fall of Rough Justice

Gepubliceerd op 19 mei 2015

 
A documentary about the rise and fall of the BBC investigative television show Rough Justice.
 

9 Michael Mansfield: ‘Risk of miscarriages of justice as great as ever’ – the Guardian

Gepubliceerd op 3 apr. 2012

 
At the Guardian’s Open Weekend, Michael Mansfield QC warns against imagining that miscarriages of justice are something that have declined since famous confession-based cases of the 1980s. In today’s world, where faulty forensic evidence is more likely to be the problem, he worries about access to justice, pointing the finger at the emasculation of the legal aid system by successive governments and a renewed attempt to erode the right to trial by jury

 

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10 Miscarriages of Justice

Gepubliceerd op 9 jan. 2010

 
Three men talk of their experiences of the UK justice system…

 

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11 Guildford Four inquiry papers show reconviction attempts – Emma Vardy

Gepubliceerd op 27 okt. 2016
©BBC 2016 – COPYRIGHT REMAINS WITH THE ORIGINAL OWNER AND IS USED FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY. NO FINANCIAL GAIN IS MADE FROM THIS VIDEO.

Previously unseen files from an inquiry into the case indicate persistent attempts to try to “reconvict” the Guildford Four who were accused of exploding two bombs in October 1974.

Gerry Conlon (pictured), Paddy Armstrong, Paul Hill and Carole Richardson, who always protested their innocence, served 15 years before their convictions were quashed by the Court of Appeal in 1989.

Emma Vardy spoke to Gerry Conlon’s sister in Northern Ireland along with a Guildford Four solicitor and a friend of Mr Conlon.

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12 BBC Anatomy of a Crime (2002)

 

Gepubliceerd op 16 apr. 2015

 
BBC cameras follow from arrest to conviction of two armed robbers who tried to rob a post office in Doncaster, South Yorkshire.
 

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13 Rough Justice: Who Killed Carl Bridgewater?

David Boothroyd
Gepubliceerd op 30 okt. 2016
The BBC’s Rough Justice programme was an occasional series investigating questionable criminal convictions. In 1996 it turned its attention to the murder of Carl Bridgewater in September 1978, for which Patrick Molloy, James Robinson and cousins Michael Hickey and Vincent Hickey had been convicted.

Rough Justice was far from the first investigation of the case; Paul Foot’s book ‘Murder at the Farm’ was published in 1986. However this examination did lead on to a second appeal and the three surviving members of the Bridgewater Four were freed on bail in February 1997. Their convictions were overturned on 30 July 1997.

TX for this programme is 10.4.96. Note that Michael Hickey in the reconstructions is an early role for Jonny Lee Miller.

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14 Rape and sexual assault investigation: British documentary 2005

Gepubliceerd op 15 feb. 2014

 
The story of the investigation of a 1994 historical sexual offence in Manchester, England.
 

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15 UK: THREE MEN ACCUSED OF MURDER RELEASED FROM JAIL AFTER 18 YEARS

Gepubliceerd op 21 jul. 2015
English/Nat

The reputation of English justice suffered another massive blow Friday – when three men were freed after eighteen years in prison for a crime they didn’t commit.

They’d been jailed for murdering a boy of 13 during a robbery – but it later turned out that the police had faked the evidence against them.

Huge crowds blocked the street outside a London court Friday as the men walked free – in the latest of a series of spectacular miscarriages of justice.

Breathing the fresh air of freedom for the first time – after almost two decades in jail for something they apparently didn’t do.

Jimmy Robinson, Vincent Hickey and his cousin Michael stood on the steps of the Appeal Court in London, savouring the cheers of hundreds of supporters who came to witness their release.

One of the three flung himself to the ground and kissed the street.

It was a triumph for Michael Hickey’s mother, Ann Whelan – she’d campaigned ceaselessly to prove their innocence.

That hasn’t yet been achieved – they’re free of bail but a full appeal hearing won’t take place until April.

At a news conference following their release, the men spoke angrily of their time behind bars:

SOUNDBITE: (English)
‘Nothing compensates 18 years, there is nothing that can compensate 18 years, there’s nothing in this world that can compensate 18 years. It’s not just about being locked up we haven’t done a prison sentence for 18 years…
SUPER CAPTION: Vincent Hickey, released prisoner

SOUNDBITE: (English)
‘Hopefully what will get changed is the way evidence is taken.’
SUPER CAPTION: Jimmy Robinson, released prisoners

The eldest of the prisoners, Jimmy Robinson, emotionally recalled the stigma of being branded a child killer:

SOUNDBITE: (English)
‘The long lonely years we’ve cried and wept and despaired and people have looked at us with hate and contempt in their eyes, called us child killer. We’re not child killers.’
SUPER CAPTION: Jimmy Robinson, released prisoners

The three men were small-time crooks when they were jailed for the killing of 13-year-old newspaper boy Carl Bridgewater in 1978. A fourth man jailed with them, Patrick Molloy, died in prison.

Their fate became a cause celebre in Britain, with many prominent personalities arguing that the trial had been unfair. Repeatedly the authorities had refused to reconsider the evidence. But finally, after hearing how police had fabricated confessions, the prosecution agreed the case against them was flawed.

Campaigners say it’s yet another blow to English justice – after a series of mistrials involving alleged IRA terrorists:

SOUNDBITE: (English)
‘ We have had a lot of these convictions exposed and this is the last in a long line of these terrible cases of injustice, I hope that when it comes to the Court of Appeal, the Court of Appeal will lay down laws which make sure that these things are less likely to happen again’.
SUPER CAPTION: Paul Foot, Journalist and campaigner

The three men could each receive more than a quarter of a million dollars in compensation – after a judgement that’s once again put English justice in the dock.

 

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16 The Story Of Oliver Campbell

Gepubliceerd op 28 mei 2016
OLIVER CAMPBELL was convicted of the murder of a shopkeeper in 1990. He then served over 10 years in prison.

The evidence against him was only a confession which he made to police officers, but it must be borne in mind that due to an injury which he suffered when he was four, he has severe learning difficulties.

The BBC’s Rough Justice did an in-depth programme on his case which revealed clearly that the conviction was unsafe.

During the course of the programme, another individual came forward to say that he was involved in the murder but that Oliver Campbell was not.

“Unfortunately, despite the overwhelming quantity of evidence establishing doubt about Oliver Campbell’s conviction, the CCRC to date have declined to refer his case back to the Court of Appeal,”

PLEASE SUPPORT OUR PETITION TO CLEAR HIS NAME

https://petition.parliament.uk/petiti…

OLIVER CAMPBELL is a community activist and socialist who was framed and imprisoned for a murder he did not commit.

Kirsty Wark, presenting a BBC Rough Justice programme on Oliver’s case, handed a letter to the then Home Secretary David Blunkett stating that Oliver “should not have to wait a moment longer for justice”. Over a decade later Oliver is out of prison on parole still campaigning to clear his name.

In July 1990, during a robbery in Hackney, London, a shopkeeper called Hardip Hoondle was shot and killed. The two men who carried out the robbery were described by witnesses as black and around five feet ten inches tall. Oliver is a gentle giant of six foot three inches.

He was convicted and sentenced to life imprisonment despite his co-accused, who admitted the robbery, giving a written account confirming that Oliver was not involved in the robbery and naming the person who shot Hardip Hoondle. The jury was never told this.

How Oliver was framed

Oliver was arrested simply because he’d owned a baseball cap similar to the one worn by the murderer. The police put enormous pressure on him to make a ‘confession’ for the shooting. Eventually Oliver agreed, but crucially his solicitor was not present at the time, despite Oliver’s learning difficulties and specific instructions to
the police to call his solicitor if they were going to interview Oliver again that day.

● A psychologist concluded that Oliver was susceptible to police pressure because of his learning difficulties. Oliver later retracted the confession. But the trial judge allowed it to go to the jury without a caution due to Oliver’s mental disability.

● The police insisted that they would find incriminating forensic evidence, including his fingerprints on a drink can found at the crime scene and his hair in the baseball cap. THEY FOUND NEITHER.

● In his ‘confession’ Oliver said he’d dropped the baseball hat in the shop. THIS DID NOT HAPPEN.

● Oliver talked of a string holster for the gun. THIS WAS LATER DISMISSED AS IMPRACTICAL BY EXPERTS

● OLIVER COULD NOT DESCRIBE THE GUN OR WHAT HAPPENED TO IT LATER.

● NO WITNESSES IDENTIFIED OLIVER AT THE ID PARADE, BUT THREE MONTHS LATER ONE OF THEM CHANGED HIS MIND!

Despite the overwhelming evidence of Oliver’s innocence, the Criminal Cases Review Commission, which was set up to investigate possible miscarriages of justice, has refused to refer Oliver’s case to the Court of Appeal.

Until his name is cleared Oliver will always be a target for future frame-ups by the police because of his criminal record. In February 2003 there was an attempted armed robbery near the bail hostel in Ipswich where Oliver was living. Despite witness descriptions of a man five inches shorter than Oliver, the police saw Oliver’s criminal record and colour of his skin and tried to pin the crime on him.

Why have Hackney police refused to reinvestigate the murder of Hardip Hoondle?

How many more times must Oliver be the victim of police laziness, racism or corruption?

● WE CALL ON HOME SECRETARY TO EXAMINE THIS
CASE AND CLEAR OLIVER’S NAME. OLIVER CAMPBELL is innocent!

Support the campaign to clear his name, What you can do:

●Get people to sign a petition/send a postcard to The Home Secretary.
https://petition.parliament.uk/petiti…

●Organise a meeting to show a DVD about Oliver’s case.

●Share this everywhere to support the campaign.
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Jack Black
Jack Black
6 maanden geleden
In denial of guilt means that if you don’t confess and show remorse, you’re not eligible for parole. Thus an innocent inmate is pressured to admit guilt if he wants to be considered for release. This of course assumes that the criminal justice system never makes a mistake and convicts an innocent man. Sadly, as we all know, this is far from the truth.

4

Dubious!
Dubious!
6 maanden geleden
Waive your right to justice or stay locked up.
What a horrible position to place an innocent person in.

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17 Rough Justice: The Case of the Thin-Bladed Knife (1982)

23 okt. 2018

Footage courtesy of Louis Barfe.

The second edition of the long-running BBC series investigating alleged miscarriages of justice.

This programme examines the case of Michael McDonagh, jailed for life in 1973 for the fatal stabbing of his brother, Francis. His son, Patrick, was also jailed.

The two men had been fighting in a lodging house one night in the Moss Side area of Manchester – but no knife was ever found.

Martin Young examines evidence about another fight that developed in the house on the same night which suggested Francis was stabbed during that brawl.

Following this programme, both convictions were referred to the Court of Appeal – but dismissed in April 1985 by the Lord Chief Justice, Geoffrey Lane.

First shown on BBC1 at 9.25pm on Wednesday 14th April 1982.

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18 The Cardiff Three & The Murder Of Lynette White – ‘Unsafe Convictions’ – 1992

11 feb. 2018

‘Unsafe Convictions’ 1992 – BBC TV’s ‘Panorama’ programme focusing on the murder of Lynette White & arrest of 5 Black men from Cardiff’s Butetown area …………….
The Cardiff Three case was a miscarriage of justice in which three men – Yusef Abdullahi, Stephen Miller and Anthony Paris – were convicted of the 1988 murder of a Cardiff prostitute, only to be cleared on appeal and a fresh suspect identified and convicted…
Richard Horwell QC – describes the Cardiff Three convictions as “one of the worst miscarriages of justice in our criminal justice system”. Two other men : John Actie & Ronald Actie – were originally charged by police but not convicted….
In 2003, Jeffrey Gafoor admitted murdering White and is now serving a life sentence….
In 2011, police officers were tried for “acting corruptly together” to make a case against the Cardiff Three. Horwell said: “The case against the police officers was that they had ‘moulded, manipulated, influenced and fabricated’ the evidence against the five innocent men.” The collapse of a trial of police officers accused of framing innocent men for murder collapsed due to human error, not corruption, an official report has concluded……….
BIG UP to Guvna Gregah for processing the video to enable it to be shared !!

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19 An Anatomy of an Injustice: Michael O’Brien’s shocking account of the Cardiff Newsagent Three

2 sep. 2018

A documentary film about a shocking miscarriage of justice that became known as the Cardiff Newsagent Three. An Anatomy of an Injustice tells the story of Michael O’Brien, one of the Cardiff Newsagent Three, who was arrested and charged for a murder he didn’t commit.

Aged just 19, and unable to read and write, Michael O’Brien was held in terrible conditions and convicted on the basis of flawed testimony. The South Wales Police failed to follow proper procedure so they could secure a conviction. But it was a wrongful conviction.

Michael turned to drugs and self harm to cope with the pain of wrongful conviction until one day he had enough. Risking further harassment in prison, he learned to read and write and taught himself law so he could take on the police and the government and overturn his conviction.

The film charts Michael’s experience from arrest, through prison to release, documenting his reflections on life in prison, his personal struggles and traumas and how he fought back against the legal system to overturn his wrongful conviction.

An Anatomy of an Injustice is part of a series of films about prison and the criminal justice system. Check out our other films on the Sambiki Saru YouTube channel to find out more about what’s going on in the English justice system and how the prison system is failing

Filmed at Shepton Mallet Prison, with thanks to Jailhouse Tours https://www.jailhousetours.com/

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20 Rough Justice 1983

16 jun. 2020

Alan livesey
 

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21 Rough Justice: Who Killed Carl Bridgewater?

30 okt. 2016

The BBC’s Rough Justice programme was an occasional series investigating questionable criminal convictions. In 1996 it turned its attention to the murder of Carl Bridgewater in September 1978, for which Patrick Molloy, James Robinson and cousins Michael Hickey and Vincent Hickey had been convicted.
 
Rough Justice was far from the first investigation of the case; Paul Foot’s book ‘Murder at the Farm’ was published in 1986. However this examination did lead on to a second appeal and the three surviving members of the Bridgewater Four were freed on bail in February 1997. Their convictions were overturned on 30 July 1997.
 
TX for this programme is 10.4.96. Note that Michael Hickey in the reconstructions is an early role for Jonny Lee Miller.
 
IMPORTANT CONTENT
 

22 The Carl Bridgewater Murder Case

14 mrt. 2017

Studio 10

We speak with criminologist Professor David Wilson about the new investigation into one of Britain’s most infamous unsolved murder cases.

Studio 10 | 8:30am weekdays on Channel TEN

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23 BAD COMPANY – Carl Bridgewater TV Movie [May 1993]

26 apr. 2020

The Bridgewater Four was the collective name given to the quartet of men who were tried and found guilty of killing 13-year-old paperboy Carl Bridgewater, who was shot at close range near Stourbridge, England in 1978.
 
All denied committing murder, but three of them were convicted. The fourth, Molloy, was found guilty of manslaughter.
 
The campaign to free and absolve the four men was led by Michael Hickey’s mother, Ann Whelan, and campaigning journalist Paul Foot.
 
Originally shown on BBC in the UK during May 1993.
 
Cast featuring Susan Wooldridge, Jonny Lee Miller, Ken Stott, George Irving, John Kavanagh, Mark Drewry, Brian McGrath and Angus Deayton.
 

24 Rough Justice – If the Cap Fits (Oliver’s Story)

3 mei 2019

BBC documentary series detailing the plight of Individuals who have wrongly convicted of crimes.
 

25 The Cardiff Three & The Murder Of Lynette White – ‘Unsafe Convictions’ – 1992

11 feb. 2018

‘Unsafe Convictions’ 1992 – BBC TV’s ‘Panorama’ programme focusing on the murder of Lynette White & arrest of 5 Black men from Cardiff’s Butetown area …………….
The Cardiff Three case was a miscarriage of justice in which three men – Yusef Abdullahi, Stephen Miller and Anthony Paris – were convicted of the 1988 murder of a Cardiff prostitute, only to be cleared on appeal and a fresh suspect identified and convicted…
Richard Horwell QC – describes the Cardiff Three convictions as “one of the worst miscarriages of justice in our criminal justice system”. Two other men : John Actie & Ronald Actie – were originally charged by police but not convicted….
In 2003, Jeffrey Gafoor admitted murdering White and is now serving a life sentence…. In 2011, police officers were tried for “acting corruptly together” to make a case against the Cardiff Three. Horwell said: “The case against the police officers was that they had ‘moulded, manipulated, influenced and fabricated’ the evidence against the five innocent men.” The collapse of a trial of police officers accused of framing innocent men for murder collapsed due to human error, not corruption, an official report has concluded……….
BIG UP to Guvna Gregah for processing the video to enable it to be shared !!
 

26 Victims Accidentally Cause a Dog JAILBREAK

14 nov. 2020

These good people we’re only trying to be kind, and now they’re at the centre of a dog revolution!
 
Welcome to the world-famous Just for Laughs Gags, we’ve been playing silly pranks on unsuspecting people in public and capturing hilarious reactions with hidden cameras.