Smell a rat

To recognize that something is not as it appears to be or that something dishonest is happening:

He’s been working late with her every night this week – I smell a rat!

Cambridge Dictionary

In British English
to detect something suspicious

In American English
to suspect a trick, plot, etc.

 

To believe something is wrong:

When I got an e-mail asking for my password, I should have smelled a rat.

AMERICAN DICTIONARY

Getting Life:
An Innocent Man’s 25-Year Journey from Prison to Peace | Biography and Memoir

On August 13, 1986, just one day after his thirty-second birthday, Michael Morton went to work at his usual time.
By the end of the day, his wife Christine had been savagely bludgeoned to death in the couple’s bed-and the Williamson County Sherriff’s office in Texas wasted no time in pinning her murder on Michael, despite an absolute lack of physical evidence.

Michael was swiftly sentenced to life in prison for a crime he had not committed. Drawing on twenty-five years of recollections, court transcripts, and more than one thousand pages of personal journals he wrote in prison, Michael recounts 

the hidden police reports about an unidentified van parked near his house that were never pursued;
the treasure trove of evidence, including a bandana with the killer’s DNA on it, that was never introduced in court;
the call from a neighboring county reporting the attempted use of his wife’s credit card that was given to local police; and, ultimately, how Michael battled his way through the darkness to become a free man once again.

Michael Morton
An Innocent Man’s 25-year Journey from Prison to Peace

Micheal Morton’s Website

What are the main reasons for the wrongful conviction of Mr.Morton?

1 I Was Wrongfully Imprisoned for Killing My Wife | Michael Morton | Google Zeitgeist

16 sep. 2014

Michael Morton was wrongly imprisoned, charged with the murder of his wife. With the help of the Innocence Project and newly discovered DNA evidence, he was released – but only after serving 25 years in jail. He discusses what he’s been through and how he is campaigning to ensure this does not happen to others, now that he is free.
 
At minute 10: “And my attorneys always smelled a rat in the case, but they didn’t know what the rat was.”
 

in British English
to detect something suspicious

in American English
to suspect a trick, plot, etc.

At minute 12:

2 John Bradley’s handling of Morton case questioned

6 okt. 2011

Michael Morton’s case is now raising questions about Williamson County District Attorney John Bradley, who opposed the testing of a bloody bandanna found near where Christine Morton was killed — now found to have DNA that is not that of Michael Morton, but a third person’s.
 
IMPORTANT CONTENT

3 Michael Morton reacts to exoneration

19 dec. 2011

Judge Sid Harle, upon the written motion of District Attorney John Bradley, dismissed the charges that go back to 1987 when Morton was wrongfully convicted in the death of his wife, Christine Morton, whose body was found in their home on Aug. 13, 1986.

4 Michael Morton: If you want to be forgiven you must forgive

Back to menu         IMPORTANT CONTANT

5 dec. 2013

 
CNN’s Chris Cuomo speaks with Michael Morton, the man who was wrongly convicted of murdering his wife.

5 An Unreal Dream: The Michael Morton Story

21 nov. 2013

 
He was locked up for 25 years for a murder he didn’t commit. Watch An Unreal Dream: The Michael Morton Story, Thursday, December 5, at 9 p.m. ET
 

6 SXSW (2013) – An Unreal Dream Trailer #1 – Documentary HD

27 feb. 2013

Movieclips Indie

SXSW (2013) – An Unreal Dream Trailer #1 – Documentary HD

Check out the SXSW Playlist: http://goo.gl/YQNbh

No case in modern America illuminates this condition more completely than the story of Michael Morton. in 1986 his young wife was brutally murdered in front of their only child, and he was accused and convicted of the crime, spending a quarter century in Texas prisons. His unreal dream was and is a powerful journey through despair and abandonment to a greater freedom than most of us know, but all can appreciate.

8 Michael Morton: The TT interview

7 feb. 2013

On Wednesday, Michael Morton sat down with the Tribune to talk about the pain and anger the court of inquiry for Ken Anderson is bringing up for him and his hopes for accountability in the wake of his wrongful conviction.
 
IMPORTANT CONTENT

9 DNA links jailed suspect to Morton – 6 pm News

10 nov. 2011

Just five weeks after Michael Morton was released from prison on a false charge of killing his wife, police on Wednesday arrested a Bastrop man on a charge of capital murder in the 1986 killing in Williamson County of Christine Morton.

25 years falsely imprisoned for murdering his wife… 
A poverful story of pain, injustice, redemption,
and reconciliation.”

Cast:

Director:
Al Reinert: http://j.mp/WkEUhx

Producer:
Kent Schaffer
Marcy Garriott
Al Reinert: http://j.mp/140D6Yv
Chris Mattsson
Jesse Lyda
Jason Wehling
John Aldrich
John Dean
Jim Embree
Nellie Gonzalez
J. Stephen Martin
Beverly Reeves
Clark Lyda
John Dean
Nellie Gonzalez
John Aldrich
Nellie Gonzalez

Writer:
Al Reinert: http://j.mp/WkEUxM
John Dean
Nellie Gonzalez
John Dean
Nellie Gonzalez
Nellie Gonzalez

Editor:
Jason Wehling
John Aldrich
John Aldrich

Cinematographer:
Levie Isaacks: http://j.mp/140D4Qc

Composer:
Chuck Pinnell
Rich Brotherton.

10 Michael Morton and the justice system – 6 pm News

28 mrt. 2012

He’s been a free man for 6 months – after 25 years in prison accused of killing his wife. But DNA testing set Michael Morton free – and proved he was indeed “innocent” as he held to all along.
 
IMPORTANT SUMMARY

11 Innocent man: There were years I plotted revenge

4 dec. 2013

 
Michael Morton and his attorney talk about the case that landed him in jail for 25 years for a crime he didn’t commit.
 
IMPORTANT VIDEO: SAME STORY AS LIAM ALLAN: KNOWN PROOF ABOUT INNOCENT

12 Morton to be released from prison

Michael Morton will appear on Tuesday in Williamson County Court and officially released after Monday’s decision by Judge Sid Harle that new DNA evidence presented clears him of his wife’s murder in 1986.

13 Judge named to oversee Anderson inquiry

17 feb. 2012

Judge named to oversee Anderson inquiry

14 Anderson admits Morton was innocent

17 nov. 2011

Former Williamson County District Attorney Ken Anderson on Wednesday admitted that Michael Morton was innocent and he apologized to the man who spent 25 years behind bars on a false conviction.

15 John Bradley testifies in Anderson case

8 feb. 2013

The prosecution rested its case Thursday afternoon in the inquiry into District Judge Ken Anderson
 
IMPORTANT CONTENT

16 Ken Anderson on Michael Morton Conviction

16 nov. 2011

Judge and former prosecutor Ken Anderson talks about the wrongful conviction of Michael Morton.

17 State Bar of Texas Files Civil Suit Against Judge Ken Anderson

19 okt. 2012

A civil lawsuit against Anderson filed in Williamson County this month by the State Bar of Texas says the former prosecutor- and current District Judge- did hide evidence in the Morton case.

18 Judge Anderson resigns amid controversy

25 sep. 2013

Embattled state District Judge Ken Anderson resigned his post on Tuesday after almost two years of controversy stemming from his role as Williamson County district attorney more than 25 years ago.

19 Benefits of the Michael Morton Act

20 Ex Prosecutor Ken Anderson jailed 3 days for misconduct in sending innocent man to 25 yrs in prison

16 nov. 2013

Ex-prosecutor Ken Anderson was sentenced to only 10 days in jail but with credit only served at total of 3 days in jail. Anderson was let out of jail Friday. Anderson, the former prosecutor and county judge was sentenced to jail time for lying and withholding evidence of Michael Morton’s innocence. As a result, Morton was wrongfully convicted and served 25 years in prison.
 
The plea deal also requires Anderson to complete 500 hours of community service, be disbarred and fined $500. Williamson County Sheriff’s Office said since Anderson was in jail for only a misdemeanor he will get a credit of two days for every one day served, and he was kept separate from other inmates because of security concerns.

21 Evidence of Innocence: The case of Michael Morton

26 mrt. 2012

After nearly 25 years in prison, Michael Morton was exonerated by a DNA test. Did a prosecutor hide evidence that could have proven Morton’s innocence during his 1987 trial?
 
IMPORTANT VIDEO
 
At minute 2:45: the procecutor
 
UNTHINKABLE THAT IT CAN HAPPEN
 
Bookmark

22 Michael Morton: Life after prison

Back to menu      IMPORTANT CONTENT

28 mrt. 2012

Michael Morton: Life after prison
 

23 Freeing Michael Morton

Back to menu

26 mrt. 2012

 
Michael Morton was wrongfully imprisoned for 25 years for allegedly killing his wife. Lara Logan speaks about her “60 Minutes” report. Also, Barry Scheck speaks to the “CBS This Morning” co-hosts about The Innocence Project and freeing Morton.
 
IMORTANT VIDEO
 
Barry Scheck speaking

24 Michael Morton Anniversary Speech

Back to menu          IMPORTANT CONTENT 

25 Michael Morton Interview – Part I

Back to menu            IMPORTANT CONTENT

22 apr. 2014

In 1987, Michael Morton was wrongly convicted of murdering his wife. Twenty-five years later and exonerated of the crime, Morton reflects on his life

26 Michael Morton Interview Part II

18 aug. 2018

In 1987, Michael Morton was wrongly convicted of murdering his wife. Twenty-five years later and exonerated of the crime, Morton reflects on his life.

27 Evening With Michael Morton and Barry Scheck

1 okt. 2014

Michael Morton, author of “Getting Life,” and Barry Scheck, co-founder and co-director of the Innocence Project, share Morton’s remarkable story of tragedy, injustice, and forgiveness with Friends members at the LBJ Presidential Library on September 30, 2014. Morton was exonerated on October 4, 2011 after spending nearly 25 years in a Williamson County prison after being wrongly convicted of the murder of his wife.
 
IMPORTANT CONTENT: Please enjoy

 

Emotional

 Barry Scheck: minute 34

28 Juror who convicted Morton feels guilty

5 okt. 2011

For years, a retired Round Rock teacher believed that sending Michael Morton to prison for life was the right decision, until she learned about a stack of evidence that never made it to the trial.
 
IMPORTANT VIDEO
 
CONTENT AND EMOTIONAL

29 Michael Morton Freed in Texas

6 okt. 2011

Innocence Project client Michael Morton was freed on October 4, 2011, in Georgtown, Texas, after serving nearly 25 years in prison for a murder DNA shows he didn’t commit. More information is available here: http://bit.ly/nDEvZk

30 Delayed Freedom: Exclusive interview with Michael Morton

31 jul. 2014

On October 4th, 2011, Michael Morton walked out of a Texas state prison a free man, exonerated for the murder of his wife.
 
Morton spent nearly 25 years behind bars for a crime he did not commit.
 
But in an exclusive sit down interview with KETK’s Garrett Sanders, Morton tells his story, and how he is fighting to make sure this doesn’t happen to anyone else.

31 Michael Morton’s journey to forgiveness

30 sep. 2016

After spending 25 years in prison for a murder he did not commit, Michael Morton has forgiven the people who wrongfully accused him – but he still struggles to forgive his wife’s killer, Mark Norwood.

32 HCCLA Reasonable Doubt – John Raley (Michael Morton)

10 apr. 2015

 
HCCLA’s Reasonable Doubt is a TV show produced by the Harris County Criminal Lawyers Association (HCCLA).
 
HCCLA is the largest local criminal defense bar in the country and is comprised of over 800 criminal defense attorneys. The show features relevant topics and guests from the criminal justice community. We broadcast LIVE every Thursday from 8-9p CST so send in suggestions & questions via Facebook or Twitter. @hccla_tv.
 
One hour

33 Nina Morrison Discusses Michael Morton Case at UVA Criminal Law Symposium

12 mrt. 2014

Nina Morrison, senior staff attorney for the Innocence Project at Yeshiva University’s Cardozo School of Law, talks about the highly publicized case of Texan Michael Morton during her Feb. 26 keynote address at the Virginia Journal of Criminal Law’s annual symposium. Sentenced in 1987 to life in prison for the murder of his wife, Morton was exonerated in 2011 after Morrison and Houston attorney John Raley uncovered gross violations of Texas discovery rules: the prosecuting attorney had withheld from the defense numerous pieces of key exculpatory evidence.
 
VERY IMPORTANT VIDEO: BEAUTIFUL CONTENT, please enjoy

34 John Raley Discusses Michael Morton Exoneration Case at OU Law

7 jun. 2012

Houston attorney and University of Oklahoma College of Law alumnus John Raley shared details about his successful pro bono case that resulted in the release of an innocent man who spent 25 years in prison. Michael Morton was wrongly accused of the murder of his wife. Through DNA testing of a bandanna found at the crime scene, Raley persuaded a Texas court of Morton’s innocence. His efforts also led to the arrest of the man police now believe to be the true killer. The Morton case captured national attention with a story featured on CBS’s 60 Minutes. This presentation is from March 2012 at OU College of Law.

35 Michael Morton Interview

18 aug. 2018

Statesman Reporter Chuck Lindell talks to Michael Morton following his testimony at a court of inquiry convened to examine allegations against former prosecutor Ken Anderson.

36 Interview: Michael Morton sits down with KXAN

4 jul. 2014

Michael Morton’s life among the trees on an East Texas lake is a little slice of Heaven now, but his new memoir, ‘Getting Life,’ details a 25-year Hell in heartbreaking detail.

37 “Getting Life” Author Michael Morton Tells His Story

25 aug. 2014

Michael Morton knew the murder of his wife would change his life forever, he just had no idea how until the police came knocking on his door.

38 Michael Morton speaks out about Greg Kelley

18 aug. 2018

Michael Morton speaks with the local news media about the Greg Kelley hearing.

39 Michael Morton hearing

3 okt. 2011

Michael Morton is in court Monday, and DNA could set him free 25 years after he went to prison for killing his wife.

40 Judge rules Anderson withheld evidence in Morton case

20 apr. 2013

Ken Anderson deliberately withheld evidence that might have helped Michael Morton avoid being wrongfully convicted of killing his wife in 1986, a judge ruled Friday.

41 MIchael Morton one-on-one: Life after prison

27 mrt. 2012

Michael Morton, 57, wrongly spent 25 years in prison for the murder of his wife — before DNA evidence proved last fall he was not the killer. He also talks about reuniting with his son who was a toddler at the time of the murder.

42 Michael Morton on Brady v. Maryland

Back to menu       IMPORTANT CONTENT

15 jul. 2015

Fifty years after Brady v. Maryland, our criminal justice system continues to wrestle with how to disclose information to defendants in criminal cases. Here, an unforgettable panel of experts, including 2015 Quattrone Exoneree Fellow Michael Morton, to learn about the impact discovery violations has on defendants, victims, and prosecutors, and what we can do to better understand and prevent these problems.
 
The unthinkable story in 25 minutes: please enjoy

43 Michael Morton takes the stand in Norwood trial, day 5

19 sep. 2016

Michael Morton’s wife was murdered by Mark Norwood in 1986.

44 Greg Kelley sex assault conviction called into question

26 mei 2017

Reactions are flooding in tonight from supporters of Greg Kelley, who was convicted three years ago for sexually assaulting a 4-year-old boy, but has maintained his innocence all along.

45 Innocent man rebuilds life after serving 25 years in prison

Back to menu

5 jul. 2014

Michael Morton, wrongfully sentenced to life in prison for the murder of his wife, has made many accomplishments upon his release, including a law that helps others who have been wrongfully convicted. Lara Logan reports.

46 AN UNREAL DREAM: THE MICHAEL MORTON STORY – Official Trailer


Back to menu

2 dec. 2013

For more information visit: www.firstrunfeatures.com/unrealdreamdvd

In 1986 Michael Morton’s wife Christine is brutally murdered in front of their only child, and Michael is convicted of the crime. Locked away in Texas prisons for a quarter century, estranged from his son, he has years to ponder questions of justice and innocence, truth and fate. Though he is virtually invisible to society, the Innocence Project and Michael’s pro bono attorney spend years fighting for the right to test DNA evidence found at the murder scene. Their discoveries ultimately reveal that the price of a wrongful conviction goes well beyond one man’s loss of freedom.

Director Al Reinert is a two-time Academy Award nominee, as a documentary filmmaker (For All Mankind, which won the documentary Jury and Audience Awards when it premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 1989) and as a screenwriter (Apollo 13).

AUDIENCE AWARD WINNER, DOCUMENTARY SPOTLIGHT- SXSW 2013

“A powerful story of pain, injustice, redemption, and reconciliation.” – Huffington Post

“Recounts an outrageous miscarriage of justice without a trace of manufactured melodrama or visual hyperbole. The film’s rivetingly straightforward style of storytelling is a perfect match for its subject. An inspiring tale of spiritual uplift, sympathetically detailing how religious faith gave Morton the strength to endure, and the mercy to forgive.” – Variety

“An unflinching look at how Morton was wrongfully convicted of murder and had his only son disown him.”- Associated Press

“Makes very real an innocent man’s nightmare through a cruel and broken justice system that stole his freedom, his relationship with his son and, nearly, his spirit.”- Houston Chronicle

“A gripping saga. What is most frightening is how much effort and time it took a squad of highly motivated, expert lawyers to claw Morton out of prison, even after the truth became widely apparent. If a respected, responsible citizen like Morton can be thrown in prison for decades based on such a feeble case, the film asks, who among the rest of us can consider ourselves safe?”- PopMatters

“An extraordinary film…ultimately a story of transcendence.”- Austin American Statesman

“Morton’s character fills this all-too-familiar story of injustice and absolution with a uniquely generous, moving spirit.”- Austin Chronicle

47 I Was Wrongfully Imprisoned for Killing My Wife | Michael Morton | Google Zeitgeist

Back to menu

16 sep. 2014

Michael Morton was wrongly imprisoned, charged with the murder of his wife. With the help of the Innocence Project and newly discovered DNA evidence, he was released – but only after serving 25 years in jail. He discusses what he’s been through and how he is campaigning to ensure this does not happen to others, now that he is free.
 
Minute 6:30 a difficult moment

48 Michael Morton Freed in Texas

Back to menu

6 okt. 2011

Innocence Project client Michael Morton was freed on October 4, 2011, in Georgtown, Texas, after serving nearly 25 years in prison for a murder DNA shows he didn’t commit. More information is available here: http://bit.ly/nDEvZk

49 Ken Anderson on Michael Morton Conviction

Back to menu

17 nov. 2011

Judge and former prosecutor Ken Anderson talks about the wrongful conviction of Michael Morton.

50 Michael Morton Interview – Part I

22 apr. 2014

In 1987, Michael Morton was wrongly convicted of murdering his wife. Twenty-five years later and exonerated of the crime, Morton reflects on his life

51 Michael Morton on a Year of Freedom

52 Innocent man: There were years I plotted revenge

Back to menu

4 dec. 2013

For more information visit: www.firstrunfeatures.com/unrealdreamdvd

In 1986 Michael Morton’s wife Christine is brutally murdered in front of their only child, and Michael is convicted of the crime. Locked away in Texas prisons for a quarter century, estranged from his son, he has years to ponder questions of justice and innocence, truth and fate. Though he is virtually invisible to society, the Innocence Project and Michael’s pro bono attorney spend years fighting for the right to test DNA evidence found at the murder scene. Their discoveries ultimately reveal that the price of a wrongful conviction goes well beyond one man’s loss of freedom.

Director Al Reinert is a two-time Academy Award nominee, as a documentary filmmaker (For All Mankind, which won the documentary Jury and Audience Awards when it premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 1989) and as a screenwriter (Apollo 13).

AUDIENCE AWARD WINNER, DOCUMENTARY SPOTLIGHT- SXSW 2013

“A powerful story of pain, injustice, redemption, and reconciliation.” – Huffington Post

“Recounts an outrageous miscarriage of justice without a trace of manufactured melodrama or visual hyperbole. The film’s rivetingly straightforward style of storytelling is a perfect match for its subject. An inspiring tale of spiritual uplift, sympathetically detailing how religious faith gave Morton the strength to endure, and the mercy to forgive.” – Variety

“An unflinching look at how Morton was wrongfully convicted of murder and had his only son disown him.”- Associated Press

“Makes very real an innocent man’s nightmare through a cruel and broken justice system that stole his freedom, his relationship with his son and, nearly, his spirit.”- Houston Chronicle

“A gripping saga. What is most frightening is how much effort and time it took a squad of highly motivated, expert lawyers to claw Morton out of prison, even after the truth became widely apparent. If a respected, responsible citizen like Morton can be thrown in prison for decades based on such a feeble case, the film asks, who among the rest of us can consider ourselves safe?”- PopMatters

“An extraordinary film…ultimately a story of transcendence.”- Austin American Statesman

“Morton’s character fills this all-too-familiar story of injustice and absolution with a uniquely generous, moving spirit.”- Austin Chronicle

53 Michael Morton Case Analysis | Police and Prosecutor Misconduct

Back to menu

12 jul. 2021

Dr. Todd Grande

This video answers the question: Can I analyze the case of Michael Morton?
 
Katheryn Thames
My cousin was Michael Morton’s lawyer. I am so proud that there are people like him out there who fight for the rights of the wrongly convicted.
 
Christine Perez
It’s scary how the Prosecutors and Polices abuse their power. All they want to do is “win”. Great analysis Dr Grande!!
Evanjuleen
Dont murder your wife: Life in jail Frame a man for murder: 5 days
 
 
 
159
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Miz Sima
I feel so sorry for him.. Why do people always have a set expectation of how others should react emotionally when they have never been in that situation?
 
 
 
142
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ron Richerson
Mr. Morton was interviewed by CNN and asked if he was bitter. He said, “Holding onto bitterness is like drinking poison and hoping someone else feels the effects.” Very mature. The prison in Texas where he was held had no A/C. You couldn’t get a good night’s sleep from all raucous noise that never ceased. He deserved every dime of his settlement. And the good ‘ol boy network always gets off scot free.
 
 
 
83
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
GetThePitchforks !!!
The police tend to be more focused on closing cases than on finding actually guilty people. Sometimes this leads to innocent people going to prison.
 
 
 
59
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Brooke Byrd
Norwood IS a monster. That poor little baby said a monster killed his mom. That’s horrifying.
 
 
 
69
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
BigZebra. Com
Just a reminder, I’m not diagnosing anybody in this video; only speculating what could be happening in a miscarriage of justice like this.
 
 
 
25
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Maureen Ingleston
I have heard of many cases of wrongly convicted people over the years and it shocks me to the core………it also makes you wonder just how many innocent people are still behind bars with no hope of proving their innocence ever.
 
 
 
79
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Charlie Bigspuds
Man tells his wife she’s too overweight, then complains about his lack of ‘poonany’ go figure that one!
 
 
 
55
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Wendy Mcreynollds
Wow… Juries may determine the verdict; however, that does not mean they are accurate. This was a fascinating case with a superlative analysis. Thanks for this.
 
 
 
19
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Quintessence
Lesson: always ask yourself this question: If my spouse is found dead tomorrow, would this note that I’m about to write, or this text I’m about to send, put me in the slammer? When you’re with friends and family, ask yourself: should I be fighting in front of these people? Because if my spouse is found dead tomorrow, this could be used against me. I know this is simplistic, and I didn’t word it very well, but you know what I mean. Remember the phrase can and will be used against you. Will be used against you. Not might be used against you.
 
 
 
9
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1tagardina
If the neighbor of Chris Watts would have been there, this man would have avoided jail.
 
 
 
41
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rejane Oliveira
Dr. Grande – this analysis was unmatched, one of your best works, in my opinion. This case is undoubtedly fascinating. Although wrong convictions are very sad, I enjoy learning more about them. Thank you kindly.❤
 
 
 
49
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Pete Peter
‘Talked to the police without an attorney’ There’s the problem right there
 
 
 
51
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Elana Hammer
@ Dr. Grande and community… This is a classic example of how easily people can be fooled in cases where there is zero physical evidence. Glad he finally got his freedom but sad that humanity, law enforcement, the criminal justice system and even the jury was easily manipulated. Thank you 🤔❤️🇺🇸❤️‍🩹✊🌎🧐
 
 
 
42
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
KingofHearts
I feel so bad for the child, he’s been subjected to a horrific life. Life threatening illness, losing your mother and growing up thinking your father killed her.
 
 
 
23
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lien Lael
Recently I watch this man on a AGT show who spent a considerable length of time in jail for a crime he never commuted. He won, by the way. It is sad when this things happen. Thank God for DNA testings, and for the honest people that remain in our courts.
 
 
 
31
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
L C
Dr. Grande, can you look at the case of the former American Airlines pilot Kit Martin who was accused of killing 3 neighbors. He was married to his 2nd wife who was a bigamist. Kit Martin was convicted a month ago. The prosecutors’ evidence was shaky at best in my view. Would love to hear your analysis.
 
 
 
63
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
grace Valentine
Incredible choice for analysis, Dr. Grande. Michael Morton is an example of police bias and conviction fever that needs more attention- chills go down my spine and it’s 93 degrees here. ❤️ this channel!
 
 
 
9
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Autumn Forest
This case is one of those that make me think I’d rather have a bench trial than a trial by jury.
 
 
 
14
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
John Pattillo
The prosecutor got off so light. It must take a strong person to not be consumed by bitterness after being cheated so unjustly
 
 
 
6
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
snookie g
It should not be easy to overturn convictions, but it should not be this hard.
 
 
 
14
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
DaisyLee1963
Watching these videos I’ve noticed Dr Grande is particularly sensitive to the suffering of children. His voice and expression frequently reflect that. I’m glad Morton connected back with his son. That’s a great development.
 
 
 
5
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Josh The Mediocre
On one hand if i truly loved my wife and she died in a bed, i’d want to sleep in that bed too, just to feel closer to her. I can see where it would be sick if he was guilty, but where it is very sweet if he is not. Reasonable doubt for sure.
 
 
 
12
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ellie Bellie
The outcome could have well had the same ending, but never ever talk to the police without an attorney present. You are digging your own grave if you do.
 
 
 
4
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sally McRae
Another interesting take on an otherwise disturbing and sad case. Suggest you analyze the case of the unsolved murders of Barry and Honey Sherman in Canada. Thank you
 
 
 
15
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Pavo
Only $2,000,000 for 24 years in jail? He would have made more than that had he been free to work.
 
 
 
11
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bebe Stensberg
You make an excellent point about being wrongly imprisoned. If you look at anyone who has been, it usually takes years correct and the damage of being in prison to one’s life, in terms of relationships, physical and mental welfare is immeasurable.
 
 
 
4
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
king kong
My worst nightmare is being falsely accused. Once when I was in High School, Some adults in my mother’s apartment building invited my boyfriend and I to a party. We went and left right away because there were no other kids there. The next day the neighbor called my mother and asked to speak to me. Her camera was missing and she wanted to know if we stole it? I felt guilty and acted guilty. Thank god she found the camera in her closet. Because how could we ever have proven our innocence?
Meer tonen
 
 
 
4
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cotton Tails
Good morning Dr Grande. Great analysis. What the police did was a travesty and unethical. I hope the father and son can try to have trust and love. Thank you Dr Grande.
 
 
 
5
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Kevin Hornbuckle
This case has a lot in common with that of the recently convicted Kit Martin in Kentucky. Martin was married to a malignant narcissist who vowed to destroy him, and she has. Martin was falsely convicted of killing three individuals. Prosecutors lied to the jury and the malignant narcissist skated by as an alternative culprit due to the impunity granted to her by many governmental agencies that could have and should have detected her criminal intent.
 
 
 
3
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
🕵️Scooby-Doo Detective🦮
Oh my gahhhh, Dr. G! Such a plot twist! Amazing analysis, I was sure Mr. Morton was guilty; not so much because he was such a jerk to his poor wife but because he wasn’t in fear of staying with his baby in the home where his wife was just murdered! Anyway, I’m glad Michael was able to reunite with his son🥰. Thank you for this video, Dr. Grande, I was unfamiliar with this case. Love you, and love your content 🤗😚.
 
 
 
3
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Darlene Lawson
Prosecutors are always desperate to find the person guilty. They will do almost anything and often send innocent people to prison. Here in Canada it has happened several times. Most of the time it’s through DNA. It’s like they never looked at anyone else. Thank-you for this interesting case of “whodoneit.” ❤️🇨🇦❤
 
 
 
2
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
harmon1286
Great presentation/narration of the ‘facts’ of this travesty. Yet, only 2 million does not equal wrongful justice…! What a mess….!
 
 
 
6
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Nate Keyes
What better way to make a woman feel sexy than complaining about her weight gain? Seriously, this demonstrates the dangers of saying “If you’re innocent you have nothing to hide.” However, I disagree with the idea that if someone in prison maintains their innocence their case should be investigated. This is what appeals are for. Also, a large number of people in prison for a serious crime claim that they are innocent. If this practice were put into place, 100% of those in prison for a serious crime would claim innocence. This is a faulty argument arrived at because there have been a few cases of wrongful conviction set against the vast, overwhelming number of cases when a defendant is rightfully found guilty. I agree that the prosecutors and police should have received far harsher sentences for what they did. Holding police and prosecutors to a far higher standard would be a better way to reduce the numbers or false convictions, as opposed to re-investigating everyone’s case because they claim innocence.
Meer tonen
 
 
 
18
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rhiannon Green
The Curtis Flowers case would be a great one to see Dr Grande cover, an investigative podcast actually helped get him released!
 
 
 
2
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Daniel
Hardest working man in mental health YouTube! Get it Dr. Grande! Nice video
 
 
 
8
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Catherine H
Another carefully crafted analysis Dr. Grande! I respectfully suggest you take a fun vacation when you hit 800K instead of filming something for all of us. Your hard work is appreciated.
 
 
 
6
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Crayon
Thank you, Dr. Grande. These cases are outrageous. And that juries can be so blind and easily swayed by prosecutors is indeed scary.
 
 
 
1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Eric Petersen
I’m glad to see that the cacti are all settled and happy on this wonderful summer Monday.🌵😀 Great video again today, I wasn’t not familiar with this case. Makes me appreciate how lucky I am in life. Thx Dr for this video, great analysis as usual. 😀
Meer tonen
 
 
 
2
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chris Mazzagatti
Dr. Grande: Can you do John Gotti? He’s idolized by a lot of people in light of being a power-hungry mob boss. It would be interesting g to know why that is and what your professional take is on his personality profile. Pretty sure it’s some combination of malignant narcissism, antisocial and psychopathy. Thank you.
 
 
 
1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Henri Lee
This case illustrates what I’ve always suspected: reasonable doubt means almost nothing, because different people have different ideas about it. 2. Trials are performances. 3. If you’re innocent, you have to act the part. 4. You’re guilty, unless proven guilty because juries always believe the cops. After all, why would they accuse you if you’re innocent? So the thinking goes..
Meer tonen
 
 
 
1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sarah Albers
Wonderful discussion on a horrible case of injustice. Glad Michael got out of prison, I am sure it affected his life over the 24 yrs and beyond. Thanks Dr. G.
 
 
 
2
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
misterpaper
This case had a huge, nearly unrivaled impact on Texas law. Following the passage of the Morton Act defense counsel now has extreme powers in criminal procedure as it relates to discovery. This goes beyond what a prosecutor must disclose according to Brady. Hardly any criminal proceeding goes on in which defense counsel does not file a Morton motion. The legal ramifications of this case cannot be understated and I think it is one example of the “system” actually working in the long run and improving itself. Great video as always, thank you for taking so much time to give a level headed, reasonable analysis of the facts of each case you feature. Its truly appreciated.
Meer tonen
 
 
 
1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cynthia Nielsen
Thank you SOOOOO much for making this video. So important to show how wrong investigators screw up, intentionally or not. This is so damn sad the dad lost so many of the best years of his life.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mia
Great job Dr Grande! Hopefully this could help people open people’s eyes to the possibly of innocence of the accused.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sarah Dunlap
I think your podcast is going to be amazing! I heard part of this audio only before I could watch and you have such a soothing voice. Very precise and easy to follow. Again, much thanks for your hard work, Dr G.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Clarissa
Man, what an awful story. When I was a kid I remember watching 20/20 and Dateline and being scared that one day I’d be falsely accused of a murder. The idea is terrifying, the system is so powerful and can be impossible to go up against if they’re convinced of your guilt.
 
 
 
1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
stuart
In the Michael Morton story, he had an experience in prison that convinced him about the existence of God
 
 
 
3
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Joni Mari Cruz
Do not talk to the police. Period. Don’t let them give you the old “well, if you’ve got nothing to hide…” routine. Even if you’re not under arrest but feel you are a person of interest to them, do not talk to the police, ask if you’re free to leave and if they say “yes”, just leave. If you are under arrest, do not say anything, ask for an attorney, do not let them cajole or bait you into a conversation. The police are not your friends in a situation like this, their only intent is to close a case and arrest someone. Do not talk to the police.
 
 
 
2
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jackie Grice
The community wanted to believe the police because they wanted to feel safe-that’s poignant. I think that’s the heart of a lot of scapegoating and victim blaming-they want to believe the victim did something wrong and identify it, so they can tell themselves they would be safe if they were in a similar situation because they would know better/act different. Love the video like always Dr Grande
 
 
 
1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Autumn Edwards
Some very good points in this one Dr Grande. I always love your analytical approach to these cases. I’m glad Michael got to reconnect with his son. I feel so bad for him! Thank you for your analysis doc! 💖💖
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ragdoll Libby
I can’t even begin to know how Morton felt/feels. Thanks for shedding light on how a jury can behave when they put all their faith into evidence given and manipulated by crooked police.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Miqseri GX
Could you do Trevor Reznik from the movie machinist?
 
 
 
6
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Debbie Milam
Great job Dr Grande. This is a very interesting case. One that I knew nothing about. I am a true crime collector of books. Yay another one to read I hope. If there isn’t one, then your excellent research will do. Thank you as always.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Kathleen Reardon
Nice job Dr. Grande. I really appreciate your summation. My husband has spent 50 in the criminal justice system as a defense attorney and 12 of those as the District Attorney. He is very critical of the police and their know-it-all attitude. Well really their attitude in general. At issue here is police over confidence in their ability to ferret out if a suspect is lying or not. As you said not everyone emotes when faced with tragedy, especially men. I’ve seen men pinch the bridge of their nose to make themselves stop crying; not once but many times. A lot of men don’t want to cry in front of other people. Sometimes women don’t want to cry in from of others. Does this mean they’re all killers? Well, of course not. Police need to use actual evidence and eye witness testimony, not hunches when following leads. It breaks my heart every time I hear about another case like this. I wonder if Michael Morton tried to sue the prosecutor in civil court?
Meer tonen
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
TheTaxburden
Never ceases to amaze me how foolish law enforcement can be when they get stuck on a certain suspect. It’s like they put blinders on. It’s disgusting the amount of life this man lost. All for his wife being murdered. Everyone deals with things differently. Just bc someone is t crying doesn’t mean they’re not upset. Morons.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

54 When prosecutors get it wrong in the courtroom

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28 nov. 2013

When Ken Anderson was sentenced to 10-days in jail for the prosecutorial misconduct leading to Michael Morton’s wrongful 25-year-imprisonment, there were grumblings the sentence was too lenient.
 
Emmanuel Reyes
It is not a mistake to hide exculpatory evidence from the judge
thekpmckay
If you keep making the same mistakes, most people would believe you’re doing it on purpose. Ethical… Riiight.
Brian Ellinger
What if the prosecutor did it on purpose??? to create a smokescreen so people could conduct an illegal business??? or to get other people out of the way so pre-planned events could take place???
Don McMannamy
With holding evidence is not a mistake it is a crime
 
 
 
22
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jeff Fraley
it is very simple all evidence should be turned over to the defense,And I think it is fair to say if they don’t they should be in prison period
 
 
 
16
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ma007rk
“Innocent mistake” or not somebody went to jail over it and should be compensated. Can the State of Texas spell after me….. C-O-M-P-E-N-S-A-T-I-O-N
 
 
 
7
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
bengaltiger96
Five days is all he got. Any time constitutional rights are violated, prosecutorial immunity should not apply.
 
 
 
6
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dano1947
I guess he wasn’t protected by prosecutorial immunity.
 
 
 
1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Robert Watson
Great he should get 25 years.
 
 
 
5
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mcdonald
Erros we all make and we admit them and do the right thing but when someone’s liberty is on the line you have to make sure … All i have to say is CORRUPTION
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ernest Reichardt
Good ! Any Prosecutor That With holds Evidence Deserves to Spend The Same Amount Of Time The Innocent Man Did !
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ronny Northington
10 days ?!?!? That poor man lost 25 years of his life and all he got was 10 days ! T E N S T I N K I N G D A Y S ?
Meer tonen
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
P J
he received 10 days for ‘witholding evidence’ that sent a man to jail for 25 yrs for something he didn’t do? no…I would not accept that. I would appeal that if I were the victim and insist more time be given. Even if I didn’t get my way, my thoughts would be well known. Because what they’re going to do, is award a huge amount of money (rightfully) and have that be the “penance” for the prosecutor…except, it’s not his money, his only punishment is 10 days and loss of his license. Whoopdeedoo, he’s like 95 what is he going to do, practice law in jail for 10 days?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Eagle Eye
“Innocent mistake” innocent man/women spends year in prison….ok😒
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mr Wonderful
Give him 25 years in the same cell the innocent guy had to rot in.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Andy Chandler
Prosecutor needs to invest in a seeing-eye dog.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
F A
Prosecutor gets prosecuted by a prosecutor for prosecutor misconduct.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
mike Akins
Typical cover ups.
 
 
 
1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ernest Reichardt
If A Prosecutor puts an innocent Person in Prison , It Not A Mistake ! Prosecutors go out of Their Way To Put People In Prison ! It’s The Prosecutors Job To Make sure the Right Person Goes To Prison , It’s not Their Job To Send Everyone To Prison ! And in The End The Prosecutor Will Be Judged By Almighty GOD And He Always Gets It Right ! All Power And Praise And Glory And Thanks And Blessings And Honor Be To Almighty GOD In HIS SON JESUS Name I Thank Almighty GOD And Pray Amen !
 
 
 
1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sword Of Esau
I hate prosecutors
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

55 DNA evidence frees innocent man who spent 25 years in jail

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6 dec. 2013

 
Alliance for Rapid DNA Testing director Chris Asplen on how DNA evidence freed innocent man who spent 25 years in jail.
 
Christiano José Jabur
That’s why I’m against the death penalty. What if this guy was convicted to death?
Berniece Hilton
That’s outrageously! I’ve just read another news about brothers who were mistakenly imprisoned for 30 years, they were charged with the rape and murder of 11-year-old. Turns out, the murderer was a man, he’s about 75 year-old creaker. As for me, such things are inadmissible in such developped country as America. 
J O
If someone wrongfully imprisoned me and I got out I would sue big time
EnSabahNur
4 real they need 2 get on the ball with DNA testing!
DirtRoadKing 4X4
The state that accused him should have to pay 1 billion dollars for each year right off the state’s budget
Dan Coulson
What a terrible thing to happen to someone. You lose your wife. While in depression and despair at this shock of it… Only when you’re on your knees from heartbreak, at your weakest point, do the police have the cowardice and audacity to attack. I really hope this man sues the state for every penny it has. He was completely innocent, and they treated him like a criminal. They had no right to do this, because he said from day one that he didn’t do it. Why should he have suffered as a direct result of the negligent and wreck less behaviour of the legal system? If this happened to me, I’m sure I would not be coping as well as this man is… If the best years of my life were stolen from me in a situation like this, as soon as I was freed, I would go and kill as many police and judges as possible, and then kill myself. People need to be held accountable for what happened here.
Dano1947
Take your time before you convict for the crime. Is that so hard to do?
Dano1947
Misconduct doesn’t occur that often, righhht!
GrailHunter
I thovght he ended up getting 10 days in Jail. The D.A. in the case.
Karen Carney
AND HE’S WHITE. SO DON’T USE THE RACE CARD THIS TIME. I ASSUME THAT’S WHY THERE’S SO FEW COMMENTS. EXACTLY
Dano1947
Wrongful convictions are the result of indifference and ambition, I’d like to bitch slap that prosecutor.
Dano1947
Ajmal Akmal: Are you right about what?
Rhona Fritz
oh gosh…25 years!! he spent one-third of his life in jail…poor man. As for me, these12 brainless idiots deserve to spend the same time in jail!
Dano1947
Incarceration is a cottage industry. Prisons make money off of people in jail.
FIA
They must give this person 1000 million for wrongly imprisioned
Warrior Prince
Wow! Horrible! People neglecting

56 Michael Morton and the justice system – 6 pm News

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28 mrt. 2012

He’s been a free man for 6 months – after 25 years in prison accused of killing his wife. But DNA testing set Michael Morton free – and proved he was indeed “innocent” as he held to all along.
 
Chris Banana
Thanks for the interview.
djnemo65
Ken Anderson has got to go down.
79tazman
The DA did not give evedence to his lawer that whould have got him off the DA became a judge now on the back of the innocent he should be tossed in jail

57 EXCLUSIVE: Greg Kelley reacts to his overturned child sex assault conviction | KVUE

6 nov. 2019

Greg Kelley spoke with KVUE and Austin American-Statesman reporter Tony Plohetski about Kelley’s reaction to the overturned child sex assault conviction.
 
 
KVUE is Austin’s ABC affiliate station and has been delivering local news for Central Texans since 1971. Today it is owned by TEGNA, Inc., which reaches approximately one-third of all television households in America. http://www.kvue.com

58 RAW: Greg Kelley sit-down prison interview with KVUE News | KVUE

 

31 mei 2017

RAW sit-down prison interview between Greg Kelley and KVUE/Austin American-Statesman’s Tony Plohetski. STORY: https://www.kvue.com/article/news/loc… | Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/kvuetv?sub_co…
 
KVUE is Austin’s ABC affiliate station and has been delivering local news for Central Texans since 1971. Today it is owned by TEGNA, Inc., which reaches approximately one-third of all television households in America. http://www.kvue.com

59 Truck Tears Off Car Door

7 mrt. 2019

When helping out a senior citizen leads to an unfortunate accident. How would you react?
 
Filmed in Montreal, Quebec Welcome to the world-famous Just for Laughs Gags channel, where we pull public pranks on unsuspecting Montreal residents and tourists.