American Indian boarding schools

1 Report details brutal treatment of Indigenous children attending U.S. boarding schools

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12 mei 2022

The federal government on Wednesday detailed for the first time the brutality and treatment Native American children suffered when they were forcibly moved into U.S. boarding schools during the course of 150 years. Deborah Parker, CEO of the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition and a member of the Tulalip Tribe in Washington, joins Amna Nawaz to discuss.

2 American Indian Boarding Schools: A Small US Town Digs for the Truth | Foreign Correspondent

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26 mei 2022

 
On the frozen plains of Nebraska, a grim search is underway.
The community is trying to locate an old cemetery that was once on the grounds of the US Indian Genoa Industrial School.

‘A cemetery at a school is not the norm – that you could die and then you’re gonna be buried out the door?’ Judi gaiashkibos, Commission on Indian Affairs, Nebraska

The State Archaeologist is using ground penetrating radar to try and locate an old cemetery that is somewhere on the grounds of the former Genoa U.S Indian Industrial School.

The Genoa school was one of a network of institutions for Native American children set up in the 19th and 20th centuries across the U.S.A.
Their purpose was to assimilate indigenous children into the white man’s world.

By 1926, it’s estimated more than 80% of Native American children were enrolled in these institutions.

“We’ve been severed from our language, from our culture, from our practices over a whole course of time, but the boarding school era did a number on our people where we almost did not recuperate from it.” Redwing Thomas, Teacher, Santee Sioux Nation.

Last year, the discovery of more than a thousand graves of children at the sites of former boarding schools in Canada pushed the U.S.A to examine its own history.

ABC journalist Stan Grant, whose family was impacted by Australia’s assimilationist policies of forcibly removing children from families, presents this powerful story.

He tells the story of a community in Nebraska trying to uncover the truth about one of the country’s largest and longest running boarding schools.

‘We were taught in school about Native American boarding schools, assimilation’, says Genoa resident Nikki Drozd ‘but we weren’t aware of the cemetery…I didn’t stop to think about the children that died here.’

This month, the US Department of the Interior has published the first major government investigation of the country’s boarding school history.

It estimated that up to tens of thousands of children could have died while attending these state-sanctioned institutions.

‘We’re still looking for those children that died’, says Judi gaiashkibos. ‘I can’t rest until I feel I’ve exhausted every possible avenue to find the children’.

Read more here: https://ab.co/3lKkqgJ

About Foreign Correspondent:
Foreign Correspondent is the prime-time international public affairs program on Australia’s national broadcaster, ABC-TV. We produce half-hour duration in-depth reports for broadcast across the ABC’s television channels and digital platforms. Since 1992, our teams have journeyed to more than 170 countries to report on war, natural calamity and social and political upheaval – through the eyes of the people at the heart of it all.

3 Buried Truths: America’s Indigenous Boarding Schools | Fault Lines


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24 nov. 2021

For roughly a century, the United States government forced Indigenous children to attend boarding schools far from their families and communities.

Hundreds of thousands of children were placed in institutions across the country, starting in the late 1800s and continuing into the 1970s.

The government’s goal was to prevent the continuation of Indigenous societies, attempting to strip the children of their cultures and punishing them for speaking their languages.

Those running the schools abused many children, and an unknown number never came home.

In June 2021, the federal government announced for the first time that it would investigate former boarding schools, including possible sites where children could be buried.

Fault Lines speaks with the descendants of boarding school students and those who survived the institutions themselves to learn how they are trying to heal from this trauma.

4 What will a US investigation into Native American boarding schools uncover? | The Stream

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Live gestreamd op 13 jul. 2021

 
Beginning in the 19th century, the US government funded a system of boarding schools where hundreds of thousands of Indigenous children were forcibly removed from their families, taught to shun their cultural heritage and assimilate to white Christian customs. Also known as “Indian residential schools”, the system included at least 367 institutions run by various US church groups from 1819 until the end of the 1960s. According to former attendees, children were poorly cared for and many endured physical abuse, sexual abuse and forced labour.

Now the US Department of the Interior wants an investigation with a focus on finding records of children who died while they attended the schools and locating unmarked graves. The investigation’s announcement followed recent discoveries of nearly 1,000 secret graves at three former schools for Indigenous children in Canada.

A modern and comprehensive study of boarding schools and their forced assimilation policies has never been done by the US government, and much of its history – including the official number of schools and its attendees – is still not known. Advocates of boarding school survivors say the institutions have been a major source of intergenerational trauma felt in Native American communities to this day.

In this episode of The Stream, we’ll discuss the legacy of Native American boarding schools and what a federal investigation of its abuses will mean to Native communities.

5 Ontario school with history of abuse linked to U.S.-based cult | School of secrets

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12 nov. 2021

Warning: This documentary contains graphic details. In School of secrets: The church, the cult and the consequences, we investigate ties between a religious organization in the U.S. that some have referred to as a cult and the now-closed Grenville Christian College in Ontario, where nearly 1,400 former students say they were subject to emotional and physical abuse.
 
You can watch an update to this documentary here: https://youtu.be/Tyki2qtaCFo
 
 
About The Fifth Estate: For four decades The Fifth Estate has been Canada’s premier investigative documentary program. Hosts Bob McKeown, Gillian Findlay and Mark Kelley continue a tradition of provocative and fearless journalism. The Fifth Estate brings in-depth investigations that matter to Canadians — delivering a dazzling parade of political leaders, controversial characters and ordinary people whose lives were touched by triumph or tragedy.

6 Schools tried to forcibly assimilate Indigenous kids. Can the U.S. make amends?

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24 jun. 2021

A mass grave with the remains of 215 children was recently found near the now-closed Kamloops Indian Residential School in British Columbia, Canada, exposing a dark history of forcibly assimilating Indigenous people. Secretary of Interior Deb Haaland announced a federal initiative Tuesday that will “uncover the truth and the lasting consequences of these schools” in the U.S. Jeffrey Brown reports.

7 Impact of Unresolved Trauma on American Indian Health Equity | Donald Warne

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19 apr. 2019

American Indian populations are diverse and have a unique history and culture in the United States. Historical trauma that resulted from numerous federal policies have had a direct impact on the health of Indigenous Americans. In this discussion, we will examine historical and cultural factors that have an impact on the health of American Indian families, and we will identify potential solutions toward achieving health equity.
 
Donald Warne
Associate Dean, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences

8 Why Historical Trauma Must Inform American Indian Healthcare

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31 mei 2018

Discussion with Margaret Moss, PhD, RN, Assistant Dean for Diversity and Inclusion, University at Buffalo School of Nursing
 
Bridgette Lazaro
Thank you for sharing this video. Your knowledge and willingness to educate others is deeply appreciated.
Kandy n kid
I absolutely love your presentation. I will definitely have my daughter watch this and test over it🙏🏿
L Gillan
Many thanks Asst Dean Moss for teaching the truth. Excellent, knowledgable & devastating presentation & exposition of historical trauma. So many parallels to the experiences of Indigenous peoples here in Australia. Honoured to have stumbled across this, because as you said, this vital information is deliberately left out of all levels of education, media and general social awareness and consciousness. Blessings to you, your family, your tribe and on your life’s work.
Rosalinda Garza
So I guess………keep keep sharing the news everywhere even on fb about Indian News! This is very nice video for the younger Highschool generations. Hello from the evergreen state. Seattle, WA.——-By the way I guess you are very much more informed than most so not using the term people instead of Indians makes sense. I do think that it is very unfair about they (people/Indians and some of there children)that they get the same funding as convicts(Federal prisioners). Again this is still contradictory because people who commit crimes shouldn’t be classified as guilty or innocent by there color. And yes some Indian folk would still let certain people go because of there ethnicitiy at first site or what they might of written on paper to represent who they are. Most people never assume trauma………but they might of gone thru that and are maybe worried to get back home to make sure IF they have someone at home that they won’t go thru trauma. So these same experiences are not lived by family members living thru these years because they do grow in the same home and at the same time just as a younger aged people makes it harder later in life to have healthy experiences that don’t produce trauma. I am generalizing. Yes This is about Indians.
Kandy n kid
Also could you recommend a book to supplement the material you went over

9 New abuse revelations at U.S.-based cult tied to Ontario private school | School of secrets

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21 jan. 2022

In School of secrets: New revelations from inside the cult, troubling developments about abuse endured at a U.S.-based cult with ties to a now-closed private religious school in eastern Ontario have come to light. The Fifth Estate reported on the history of abuse allegations at Grenville Christian College and the school’s connection to the Community of Jesus last fall.
 
Warning: This documentary contains graphic details of sexual assault.

10 Colorado college reckons with a troubling legacy of erasing Indigenous culture

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11 mei 2022

Over the course of more than 100 years beginning in the 1800s, hundreds of thousands of Native American children in the U.S. were removed from their families, placed in federal boarding schools and forced to abandon their Native languages and culture. One college in Colorado is now reckoning with that history. Hari Sreenivasan reports for our “Rethinking College” series.

11 Native American Boarding Schools

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9 jan. 2019

A moving and insightful look into the history, operation, and legacy of the federal Indian Boarding School system, whose goal was total assimilation of Native Americans at the cost of stripping away Native culture, tradition, and language. #NativeAmerican #Indigenous #IndianBoardingSchools
 
 

12 Broken Treaties: full documentary

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19 nov. 2020

 
For thousands of years, more than 60 Native American tribes lived in Oregon’s diverse environmental regions. At least 18 languages were spoken across hundreds of villages. This civilizational fabric became unraveled in just a few short decades upon contact with white settlers in the 19th century.
 
In this “”Oregon Experience”” documentary, Native Oregonians reflect on what has been lost since and what’s next for their tribes.

13 IN FOCUS Discussion: Native American Boarding Schools

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3 aug. 2021

 
Beginning with the Indian Civilization Act of 1819, the U.S. enacted laws and implemented policies establishing and supporting Indian boarding schools across the nation. The purpose of these schools was to culturally assimilate Indigenous children by forcibly relocating them from their families and communities to distant residential facilities where their identities, languages, and beliefs were to be suppressed.

According to the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition, nearly 83 percent of Native American school-aged children were attending boarding schools by 1926. The organization said that for more than 150 years, hundreds of thousands of Indigenous children were taken from their communities, punished for preserving their tribal identity, and forced to take on white Christian values, religion, culture, and language. It is believed that most U.S. citizens do not know about the existence of these boarding schools or the intergenerational trauma suffered by Native American communities.

In June, Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland announced her department would be launching an investigation, called the Federal Indian Boarding School Initiative. It’s said to be a comprehensive review of the troubled legacy of federal boarding school policies and preparation of a report, expected to be completed in April 2022, detailing available historical records, with an emphasis on cemeteries or potential burial sites. This comes after the recent discovery of 215 unmarked graves by the Tk’emlúps te Secwepemc First Nation at the Kamloops Indian Residential School in Canada.

In an op-ed for the Washington Post, Sec. Haaland wrote that she is a product of “these horrific assimilation policies.” She explained that her maternal grandparents were stolen from their families when they were only eight years old and forced to live away from their parents, culture, and communities for five years. She said that the historical attempt to wipe out Indigenous identities continues to manifest itself in the disparities our Native American communities face, such as long-standing intergenerational trauma, cycles of violence and abuse, disappearance, premature deaths, and additional undocumented physiological and psychological impacts.

To this day, residential boarding schools continue to operate through the U.S. Interior Department and the Bureau of Indian Education. However, the department said that in sharp contrast to policies of the past, these schools now aim to provide a quality education to students from across Indian Country and empower Indigenous youth to better themselves and their communities as they seek to practice their spirituality, learn their language, and carry their culture forward. However, the process of healing, justice, and reconciliation is just beginning and it starts with bringing these traumatic events to light.

In July, Utah Diné Bikéyah sent a letter to Sec. Haaland to offer their assistance in the investigation. All 11 members of their board attended these residential schools as children and are now a network capable of reaching hundreds, if not thousands of other attendees. They are currently collecting stories internally and have a non-comprehensive list of resources and locations of facilities in Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and Colorado.

Denae Shanidiin, director of MMIWhoIsMissing and Angelo Baca, cultural resources coordinator at Utah Diné Bikéyah joined ABC4’s Rosie Nguyen for an IN FOCUS Discussion. They provided background on the history of residential boarding schools, the recent uncoverings of murdered children at facilities in Canada, the experiences of their family members and friends who attended these schools, how the assimilation left deep societal scars on our Native American population, the letter sent to Sec. Deb Haaland, and what they hope comes out of it.

 

14 ‘Children did die here’: Michigan’s Indigenous boarding schools

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2 aug. 2021

The same types of boarding schools that existed in Canada were also in the United States. Michigan was home to the longest-running one in the nation. (Aug. 1, 2021)

15 Woman remembers Michigan boarding school’s dark history

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2 aug. 2021

The discovery of unmarked mass graves at Indigenous boarding schools in Canada is sparking fears similar discoveries could be made in Michigan. (Aug. 1, 2021)

16 Jim Crow of the North – Full-Length Documentary

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Roots of racial disparities are seen through a new lens in this film that explores the origins of housing segregation in the Minneapolis area. But the story also illustrates how African-American families and leaders resisted this insidious practice, and how Black people built community — within and despite — the red lines that these restrictive covenants created.
 
Dive into more local history: https://tinyurl.com/minnesotahistory.
 
00:00 “Aryans Only. No African American blood or descent.”
03:17 Minnesota Leads Integration
06:01 A Black Family Moves Into A White Neighborhood
11:53 The Beginning of Racial Covenants
15:01 Mapping Prejudice
16:28 Who Benefits From Urban Planning?
19:50 Supreme Court Upholds Racial Covenants
20:59 The Invisible Color Lines
22:52 Citizen Terrorism
27:21 Redlining: Government Approved
31:15 Jim Crow of the North
34:16 Manufacturing Urban Poverty
39:05 Racial Covenants in the Suburbs
41:38 Fair Housing and the American Dream
46:00 1968 Fair Housing Act
47:39 35W and the Destruction of Black Communities
50:43 The Past Influences the Present
51:38 Mapping the History of Housing Discrimination
55:14 More Than Bricks and Mortar
56:30 Credits and More to Watch
 
 

17 Unseen Tears: The Native American Boarding School Experience in Western New York Part 1

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4 nov. 2013

I need subscribers to keep this channel viable. Subscribe. It helps me make more videos. You can rent or buy Unseen Tears at: https://www.amazon.com/Unseen-Tears-A…
 
Unseen Tears Native American boarding school documentary. Residential schools / boarding schools in the U.S. and Canada have had a lasting impact on Native communities. Native American families in Western New York and Ontario continue to feel the impact of the Thomas Indian School and the Mohawk Institute. Survivors speak of traumatic separation from their families, abuse, and a systematic assault on their language and culture. Western New York Native American communities are presently attempting to heal the wounds and break the cycle inter-generational trauma resulting from the boarding (residential) school experience. Unseen Tears documents the stories of boarding school survivors, their families, and social service providers.
 
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18 Unseen Tears The Native American Boarding (Residential) School Experience in Western New York Part 2

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4 nov. 2013

 
Subscribe. It helps me make more videos.
Rent or buy Unseen Tears at: 
 
Unseen Tears Native American boarding school documentary. Native American families in Western New York and Ontario continue to feel the impact of the Thomas Indian School and the Mohawk Institute. Survivors speak of traumatic separation from their families, abuse, and a systematic assault on their language and culture. Western New York Native American communities are presently attempting to heal the wounds and break the cycle inter-generational trauma resulting from the boarding (residential) school experience. Unseen Tears documents the stories of boarding school survivors, their families, and social service providers.

19 Unseen Tears The Native American Boarding (Residential) School Experience in Western New York Part 3

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Subscribe to help me make more videos.
Rent or Buy Unseen Tears:
 
Unseen Tears Native American boarding school documentary. Native American families in Western New York and Ontario continue to feel the impact of the Thomas Indian School and the Mohawk Institute. Survivors speak of traumatic separation from their families, abuse, and a systematic assault on their language and culture. Western New York Native American communities are presently attempting to heal the wounds and break the cycle inter-generational trauma resulting from the boarding (residential) school experience. Unseen Tears documents the stories of boarding school survivors, their families, and social service providers.

20 Indian Boarding Schools

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3 mrt. 2018

 
Pictures with Timeline

21 Benjamin Madley – An American Genocide: The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe

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27 sep. 2017

2017 William Howard and Hazel Butler Peters Lecture
Given by UCLA Professor of History, Benjamin Madley for the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies at Brigham Young University, 21 September 2017.

22 Blind Man Knocks Over Statuette Gag

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2 mei 2011

Blind man knocks a miniature statue on display over with his cane, and it falls to the ground. The prank victims who are helping him navigate go back to return the statue to its place. Unfortunately, every time they turn their backs on the statuette to walk away, it seems to fall over – again and again. The security guard on duty is less than amused.